Program/CE # CE Hours Time Date Room Program Title Program Description Learning Objective #1 Learning Objective #2 Learning Objective #3 Program Summary First Name Last Name Lead Presenter Highest Degree Awarded Co-Presenter 1 First Name ( If you do not have / a co-presenter please type N/A and proceed to / ques... Co-Presenter 1 Last Name Co-Presenter 1 highest degree awarded Co-Presenter 2 First Name Co-Presenter 2 Last Name Co-Presenter 2 Highest Degree Awarded Co-Presenter 3 First Name Co-Presenter 3 Last Name Co-Presenter 3 Highest Degree Awarded Co-Presenter 4 First Name Co-Presenter 4 Last Name Co-Presenter 4 Highest Degree Awarded If there are more than four (4) presenters, please list the name, / highest degree awarded, and ins... Keyword 1 Keyword 2 Keyword 3
105 1 10:00-10:50 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 411 Q Methodology: A Mixed Method for Studying Subjectivity Q methodology is fundamentally different from other quantitative research methodologies in the social sciences. It is a mixed method which allows researchers to analyze qualitative data in an objective or quantitative way. It allows the researcher to illuminate the reality constructions of a population of interest rather than relying solely on the researcher’s construction of reality. In this way, research utilizing Q methodology can add to the counseling research by bringing new, distinct, and unique perspectives to the literature. Attendees will gain an understanding of the foundation of Q methodology, how it differs from R methodology, and will be provided an overview of each step of the research process from framing a research question to designing, implementing, and analyzing data. The presenter will demonstrate running factor analysis and factor rotation in PQMethod, the data analysis software for Q methodology. Ways that Q methodology research can add to the counseling research base will be discussed. This session will include experiential components as participants will help design a mock Q sample and complete a Q sort. / Participants will be able to determine whether Q methodology is appropriate given their research question, identify a concourse of communication, and create a Q sample. Participants will be able to select the P-sample, facilitate the Q sorting procedure, including the post-sort interview. Participants will be able to navigate PQMethod to extract factors, and have a basic understanding of interpreting the emergent factors. Q methodology is fundamentally different from other quantitative research methodologies in the social sciences. It is a mixed method which allows researchers to analyze qualitative data in an objective or quantitative way. Attendees will gain an understanding of the foundation of Q methodology, how it differs from R methodology, and will be provided an overview of each step of the research process from framing a research question to designing, implementing, and analyzing data. Melissa Fickling M.A.                           mixed method research Q methodology
101 1 10:00-10:50 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 406 Introduction to Hierarchical Linear Modeling: Applications for Counseling Research Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM; also referred to as multilevel modeling or MLM) has become an increasingly popular analytic tool used by social science researchers.  The popularity of HLM designs stems from the flexibility and unique advantages they provide in terms of addressing nested data structures beyond what one might find using more traditional techniques (i.e., general linear models [GLM] or repeated-measures ANOVA).  As HLM designs appear more frequently in the professional literature, counseling researchers will need to develop a better understanding of how to critically evaluate these multilevel studies as well as conduct their own.  This session introduces participants to the basic principles of hierarchical linear modeling and explains how the technique can be applied to contemporary counseling research. In addition to discussing the underlying conditions of HLM designs and learning the advantages and disadvantages of these designs, participants will be shown how to conduct and interpret their own HLM analyses through the presentation of several practical examples (including actual output data) of HLM analyses computed using various statistical software packages.  Handouts that include step-by-step directions for running HLM analyses using available statistical software packages, as well as an annotated bibliography indicating where additional information can be obtained, will be distributed. Explain the basic tenets of HLM including the advantages this design affords researchers. Articulate the differences between GLM and HLM designs and when each would be the appropriate design to select. Interpret HLM statistical output produced by various statistical software programs. Are you planning a study for which you believe a multilevel, hierarchical design may be warranted?  If you answered yes, then this is the session for you!  Participants will be introduced to an increasingly popular statistical technique known as hierarchical linear modeling (HLM).  Throughout the session, participants will be taught how to decide whether HLM is the best choice given the data they are collecting and shown how to perform the analysis using available statistical software packages. Joshua Watson Ph.D.                           hierarchical linear modeling statistics multilevel modeling
102 1 10:00-10:50 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 408 Qualitative Content Analysis: A Research Illustration via Blogs of LGBT Evangelical Christian College Students Rationale: Qualitative Content Analysis (QCA) is an underutilized method in counselor education for systematically organizing and describing qualitative data by creating a coding frame, including a pilot and revision phase, and applying that frame to the material consistently.  In her exhaustive book Qualitative Content Analysis in Practice, Schreier (2012) detailed this method for exploring qualitative materials including blogs, journals, case notes and related research materials. This presentation explores the analysis method of QCA utilizing a completed research study examining blogs. Online blogs, much like diaries or journals, offer rich sources of qualitative data to explore phenomena for research in the social sciences. The presentation will explore how to apply the method of QCA utilizing examples from a recent study exploring evangelical Christian LGBT college students at conservative Christian colleges. As most content analyses conducted focus only on the quantitative display of results, QCA expands on this by incorporating qualitative data utilizing thick description. This presentation will detail the challenges of developing an effective QCA coding frame and presenting the results of the data in a journal article. Inevitably, the researcher must make certain choices in displaying the data, complex choices that may determine the ability for reader’s to comprehend the method and results and to get the article published. These research decisions and obstacles to creating a successful, published QCA study will be discussed using examples from the aforementioned study on evangelical Christian LGBT college students using found blogs. The primary goal of this presentation is to explore a method for implementing a qualitative content analysis in counselor research. Additional goals that will be discussed with participants include: examining methods and challenges for data display of results in a journal article using QCA, challenges to getting QCA’s published, the benefits of using blogs in research (active versus inactive solicitation), and the utility of applying QCA to other qualitative data such as case notes or journals. The delivery method of this presentation will be through a practical research example of QCA and participants are encouraged to take an active part in the session. This session embraces the conference theme by exploring an applied research method to examine qualitative data utilizing a culturally inclusive example exploring the spirituality and counseling needs of LGBT conservative evangelical Christian college students. Attendees will explore the utility of implementing Schreier’s (2012) qualitative content analysis research methods utilizing a practical example of blog research on LGBT evangelical Christian college students. Attendees will discuss barriers to creating, displaying, and publishing an effective coding frame and the results of qualitative content analysis. Attendees will leave the session with beginning knowledge to explore qualitative content analysis in their research. Qualitative content analysis (QCA) is an underutilized data analysis tool in counseling research. This session will illustrate the development of a qualitative content analysis utilizing practical examples from a recently completed research study using blogs of LGBT evangelical Christian college students at conservative Christian colleges. Attendees will learn about the utility of qualitative content analysis, explore the barriers of implementing this analysis method, and learn the beginning knowledge to implement a QCA in their research through blogs or related qualitative data. Kevin Snow M.S., M.A.                           Qualitative Content Analysis Blog Research
103 1 10:00-10:50 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 407 Funding a Research Agenda in Counselor Education: Ideas for Successfully Securing Grants Compared to academicians in other mental and allied health fields, counselor educators’ expertise and training for funding a research agenda is lagging. As our society becomes more heterogeneous and support for mental health initiatives dwindles, it becomes more critical for the counseling field to foster fundable research aimed at establishing culturally-relevant contexts for mental health and best-practices for treatment and training. Consequently, this ACES Inform session will supplement counselor educator’s strategies for seeking external funding.  /  The principle goals for this program are to increase participants’ awareness, knowledge, and skills for planning a fundable research agenda. The presenters have experience writing, receiving, and administering research agendas funded by NIH, US Dept. of Ed, and private foundations. For the purposes of this 2-hour session, the presenters’ previous experiences will be organized into: (a) employing a “developmental approach” for funding a research agenda; (b) emphasizing the increasing role of multidisciplinary collaborative efforts in securing funding; and (c) incorporating grant-funding basic knowledge and skills into pre-planning, writing, and post-award administration of funds.   /  The program delivery method will be didactic in nature, with ample opportunities for participants to interact with each other. Furthermore, experiential activities and case studies will be shared in hopes of increasing relevance for all participants. Consider a developmental approach to funding a research agenda over time, with emphasis on starting with smaller, more manageable funding amounts Compare the differences between awards from public and private sources, as well as how such sources may be complementary Develop knowledge and skills for applying to, securing, and administering grant funding from a variety of sources, across different research interests and partnerships Counselor educators are increasingly expected to seek external funding for their research projects. Unfortunately, they lag behind their colleagues in related mental and allied health fields in their experiences with successful administration of public and private grants. In this session, presenters will share their experiences with planning, writing, and managing internal and external awards, in an engaging format aimed at helping participants frame their research from a fundable perspective. Jose Villalba PhD Laura Gonzalez PhD                     Grants Funding Research
104 1 10:00-10:50 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 412 The Science of Counseling: Creating Fundable Research Initiatives Although counselors and counselor educators still debate the issue, the need for accountability and outcome research make the adoption of scientific methods a necessary evolution in the counseling profession (Blair, 2010). The focus on accountability has pushed the profession to venture into new research terrain. Evolving foci on evidence-based practice, clinical trials, and integrated behavioral healthcare have increased opportunities for funding counseling research and ensuring positive growth of the profession (Sheperis, Young, & Daniels, 2010).  /  / Initiatives like ACES Inform lend credence to our argument that counseling can now be considered a STEM area (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math). The generation of empirically supported treatment approaches and the investigation of neurological connections to human functioning support the classification of counseling as a science. Considering counseling as a STEM field results in researchers having even more opportunities to fund their projects. The goal of this program is to provide strategies for developing STEM based counseling research and provide examples of current research funded through STEM initiatives. Through an interactive session, the presenters will share a current project that partners counseling, engineering, and medicine to study diagnosis and treatment of autism spectrum disorders in children as an example of the STEM nature of counseling. We will provide guidance for counseling researchers to consider future cross-STEM collaborations.  /  / This 50-minute will enhance scholarship opportunities for faculty members and doctoral students. Consideration of counseling as a science is directly related to the conference theme because it has clear implications for pedagogy and practice.  /  / Blair, L. (2010). A critical review of the scientist-practitioner model for counselling psychology. Counselling Psychology Review, 25(4), 19-30. / Sheperis, C. J., Young, J.S. & Daniels, M.H. (2010) Counseling Research: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Single Subject Design.  Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall. / • Identify STEM opportunities in counseling and List research support initiatives for projects • Relate counseling outcome research to STEM funding and Recognize funding opportunities for future research in counseling • Illustrate current research as models of STEM initiatives In an age of accountability, counselors and counselor educators must engage in scientific research. We argue that advances in counseling research now qualify counseling as a science and lend support for classification as a STEM area. By approaching counseling research from a STEM perspective (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math), researchers have more opportunities to fund their projects, a critical component to sustainability in the profession. This program will provide strategies for developing STEM based counseling research and examples of current STEM funded research. Donna Sheperis PhD Carl Sheperis PhD                     science STEM research
100 0 10:00-11:50 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 405 Mentoring in Writing and Publication: Hands on Help Toward Publishing This workshop meets the manuscript preparation requirement for ACES INFORM. / There are few opportunities for one-on-one mentoring in the publication process, yet publishing research is a priority for faculty and doctoral students. Attendees bring a manuscript and meet individually with editorial board members of The Journal of Counselor Preparation and Supervision to discuss the manuscript , and receive specific feedback on the writing and research, including changes needed for publication. In addition the editor will discuss the publication process and answer questions. The intention is to reduce anxiety about publishing manuscripts and increase attendees’ confidence in submitting manuscripts for review and publication. When possible, attendees will be matched with an expert mentor in the topic or research area of the manuscript. Editorial board members will “give back” lessons they have learned as reviewers and editors, especially to participants from underserved or culturally diverse groups, to promote and increase publication of articles that reflect the diversity of ACES members. / Join us for this session to: / 1. Receive individualized mentoring of a manuscript, increasing the probability of publication. / 2. Become informed authors about the cumulative publication process. / 3. Learn more about the publication process, including timelines and appropriate communication. / Receive individualized mentoring of the manuscript brought to the workshop. Learn how to best communicate with journal editors and editorial board members. Increase their knowledge of the manuscript publication process. Now that your manuscript is written, how do you get it published? Bring your manuscript and meet with Journal of Counselor Preparation and Supervision editorial board members to determine the overall publication quality, recommend changes, and discuss the content and research. The goal of this workshop is to reduce the anxiety about publishing manuscripts and increase the attendees’ publishing. When feasible, attendees will be matched with an expert mentor in the topic or research area Edina Renfro-Michel Ph.D. Jane Webber PhD Michael Hannon PhD Harriet Glosoff PhD         Publishing Research Mentoring Journal of Counselor Education and Supervision
106 1 11:00-11:50 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 407 Single Case Study: Constructing A Multiple Baseline Design For Evidence-Based Research The field of counseling is being held more accountable for providing evidence-based practices to clients. These counseling services are mainly provided in individual sessions and practitioners are concerned with the individual growth and progress of the client. Therefore, single-case study is an experimental methodology that can be applied to the field of counseling and is practical for practitioners to use. This design allows for both quantitative and qualitative data to be provided to the researcher and can be used in determining evidence based practices if guidelines are followed. During this informational presentation, attendees will have the opportunity to learn about multiple baseline design. Design components and structure will be discussed, as applied to a recent play therapy intervention study. Additionally, guidelines for evidence based research in special education provided by Horner, et al. (2005) will be reviewed and applied to the field of counseling. Lecture, visual media, and discussion will be utilized during this informative presentation. This presentation is related to the conference theme “ACES Leadership for Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Practice, ” as this type of research design is used to determine individual progress and growth and is therefore sensitive to diversity. 1.) To understand the basic design components and structure of multiple-baseline single case study research 2.) To understand and identify the Horner, et al. (2005) guidelines for evidence-based practices as applied to the field of counseling 3.) To understand the definition of a functional relation and to identify a functional relation based on the graphed data This presentation is intended for professionals who are interested in conducting an evidence-based study using multiple baseline design. Design components and structure will be discussed, as applied to a recent play therapy intervention study. Additionally, guidelines for evidence based research in special education provided by Horner, et al. (2005) will be reviewed and applied to the field of counseling. Jennifer Geddes Hall ABD (anticipated 7/15)                           single-case study research evidence-based practices
110 1 11:00-11:50 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 411 Single-Group Studies: Getting Your Foot in the Door through Pilot Evaluation Rationale: Single-group studies offer a great strategy for piloting an intervention.  Although causal inferences cannot be drawn, the results of a well-designed single-group study can (a) indicate whether a more rigorous, complex evaluation should be conducted, (b) demonstrate relationships between participant variables and improvements made over time, and (c) help install and evaluation infrastructure within a clinical or educational setting.      / Program Goals: This program will provide an overview over single-group study design in the context of community-based pilot studies. Program content will cover (a) practicalities and limitations, (b) modalities for implementation (pretest-posttest only, predictive designs, and mixed methodological, explanatory designs), (c) strategies for exploring moderators of improvements during intervention, (d) methods for organizing logistics of evaluation within a facility, and (e) approaches to data analysis. Special attention will be placed on these designs as a social action research methodology with potential to support dissertation development and related scholarship. Attendees will be provided with handouts that support identifying research questions, variables of interest, and opportunities for pilot studies in their communities. / Connection to Conference Theme: All session content will be developed and presented to emphasize cultural sensitivity and social justice issues associated with pluralistic views of program success. / describe the importance of using quantitative and qualitative approaches within pilot studies identify 3 methods for completing single-group studies and understand how they are informed by prudent assessment and evaluation practices implement ethical and culturally-relevant strategies for interpreting and reporting the results of single-group studies Single-group studies offer a practical strategy for piloting an intervention. This session will provide an overview for designing an approach that provides useful information about whether a more complex evaluation should be conducted, correlational relationships between participant variables and improvements over time, and helps to install an your evaluation infrastructure within your clinical or educational setting. Stephen Lenz Ph.D., LPC NA                         Pilot Studies Outcome Evaluation Mixed Methodology
107 1 11:00-11:50 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 406 Using Visual Methods in Qualitative Research This program intends to inform attendees about the emerging use of visual methods as data sources in qualitative research. These visual methods include photography, artwork, and videos provided by, created by, or found by study participants. By attending this presentation, individuals will gain a greater understanding of: qualitative research, knowledge of the history of visual methods in research, visual methods and multiculturally competent research, the benefits and costs of using visual methods as data sources, ethical concerns when using visual methods, how and what data sources can be used to answer particular research questions. Detailed information regarding the coding,  analysis, and reporting of visual methods will be provided. This information will be provided via lecture, discussion, and examples of visual methods will be shared. Qualitative research in counseling, and across disciplines, allows for researchers to gain knowledge directly from participants, allow for their lived experience to be documented empirically. Qualitative research, especially visual methods, allows for direct expression of participant experience and cultural experience. Qualitative research, especially the use of visual methods, is beneficial to individuals of diverse and marginalized statuses, as it allows previously unheard voices to be heard, connecting to the conference theme of “Leadership for Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Practice.” Understanding of how visual methods can be used in qualitative research Understanding of collection, analysis and reporting of visual methods in qualitative research Knowledge of the benefits and costs of using visual methods in qualitative research This program will introduce attendees to the emerging use of visual methods as data sources in qualitative research. Visual methods can include photography, artwork, and videos provided by, created by, or found by study participants. This program will: review common qualitative research traditions, review the history of visual methods in research, the benefits and costs of using visual methods as data sources, and how and what data sources can be used to answer particular research questions. Detailed information regarding the coding and analysis of visual methods will be provided. Madeline Clark MSEd Jamie Bower M.Ed Brett Gleason                 Qualitative Research Visual Methods
108 1 11:00-11:50 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 408 Entrepreneurship and Innovative Externally Funded Research Practice: Opportunities and Challenges Research, particularly externally funded research, plays an important role in the scholarly and financial development for academic programs, colleges, and universities. Depending on the Institution, varied benefits, including financial (via research overhead dollars), also exist for individual faculty. Subsequently, colleges and departments increasingly want and need faculty engagement in funded research. However, faculty in counselor education and colleges of education often times develop innovations with commercializable potential that are left untapped. This presentation will provide a detailed primer on entrepreneurship, intellectual property and technology transfer, and commercialization and royalties in the context of a university environment. Additionally, parlaying current research interests into fundable and commercializable innovation will be discussed along with funding opportunities to support these ventures. Learn the fundamentals of external funding, entrepreneurship, intellectual property, technology transfer, and commercialization in a university setting Learn and develop strategies to find and apply for external funding to support research and entrepreneurship Develop a research funding plan with commercialization potential Faculty in counselor education and colleges of education often times develop innovations from their research with commercializable potential that are left untapped. This interactive session will (a) provide fundamentals of external funding, entrepreneurship, intellectual property, technology transfer, and commercialization in a university setting; (b) present, discuss, and identify strategies to find and apply for funding to support research and entrepreneurship; and (c) develop a funding research plan with commercialization potential. Andrew Daire Ph.D.                           External funding Research Commercialization
109 1 11:00-11:50 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 412 Strategies for Partnering with Large School Districts to Conduct Randomized Controlled Trials Supporting School Counseling Outcome Research The 50 minute education session will focus on processes for securing and facilitating school district partnerships that are frequently a requirement prior to being awarded funding for large federal grants. Presenters are in the final year of a $2.7 million project funded by the US Department of Education and will share strategies for engaging district partners as well as successful strategies for conducting large scale school based research with fidelity. Goals include encouraging counselor educators to engage in outcome research to broaden to base of evidence based practice available for school counselor implementation in schools and sharing successful strategies linked to the planning, implementation, and data collection of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCT's).  The delivery method will include presentation, sharing between participants, handouts, and question/answer with presenters. The intent is to inform participants regarding research processes, strategies for maintaining fidelity, research methods, and analyses associated with large scale field based studies using the presenters experience as a context for the presentation.  The RCT being used to frame the presentation was conducted in large and very diverse school districts in Florida. Implications for working in such diverse districts will also be shared. Participants will learn strategies for engaging large school districts in outcome research. Participants will gain appreciation for the importance of conducting outcome research related to school counseling. Participants will learn strategies that can enhance research processes associated with large RCT's including conducting and collecting data on a large scale with fidelity. The 50 minute education session will focus on processes for securing and facilitating school district partnerships that are frequently a requirement prior to being awarded funding for large federal grants.  Presenters are in the final year of a $2.7 million project funded by the US Department of Education and will share strategies for engaging district partners as well as successful strategies for conducting large scale school based research with fidelity. Linda Webb Ph.D. John Carey Ph.D. Elizabeth Villares Ph.D. na na na na na na na School Counselin Outcome Research Randomized Controlled Trials Academic Research
111 1 1:30-2:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 406 A Practical Guide to Instrument Development Developing an instrument is not uncommon, though it is easy to do incorrectly. To ensure optimal reliability and validity, researchers must carefully attend to issues such as the following outlined by DeVellis (2003) and Lee and Lim (2008): determine what is to be measured, generate an item pool, determine the format for measurement, have the initial item pool reviewed by experts, consider the inclusion of validation items, administer items to a development sample, evaluate the items, and optimize the scale length. The goal of this program is to delineate these important steps for counseling researchers to follow, including emphasis on test theory, validity and reliability, and appropriate data analyses, in order to develop sound measures for the counseling field. The delivery method primarily will be lecture aided by examples to explain key concepts. Attendees will be able to: 1) articulate appropriate steps of instrument development 2) describe how decisions made during instrument development impact validity and reliability 3) apply appropriate data analyses to evaluate an instrument Are you thinking about developing a new instrument? This presentation will review important steps to help you develop and test a new instrument, thus paving the way for sound research. This program particularly will emphasize the classical test theory approach, issues of validity and reliability, and data analyses pertinent to instrument development along with follow-up steps based on results. William McKibben                             instrument development research  
115 1 1:30-2:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 405 Grant Writing for Counselor Educators: Strategies for Success In this challenging economic time, finding funding to support projects, programs, and research agendas is increasingly critical. At the same time, grant seeking has become more competitive. Having the knowledge and understanding of grant funding is a needed skill for many counselor educators. Federal, state and foundation funding opportunities exist for mental health related research and programs. This presentation will provide concrete strategies for effectively navigating each of these steps in the grant-seeking process. /  / The material to be presented is incorporated from the presenters’ combined 25 years of experience and success with grants administration. In addition, all material and content is accumulated from the most recent literature, government circulars and foundation resources.  Participants will also be given concrete strategies on grant writing including (1) turning a research or program idea/need into a fundable proposal; (2) navigating the components of a request for proposals (RFP); (3) using strategies to develop a winning proposal including the research/activity plan, methods, management plan, evaluation and dissemination; and (4) developing a budget and writing a budget justification. Participants will also have a chance to share specific issues or concerns in a problem solving and interactive forum offering a consultative and learning environment for all attendees. All participants will be provided with a handout of the material presented. This presentation fits within the conference theme of culturally relevant practices as both facilitators are well versed in addressing research and program funding needs with regard to race, ethnicity, SES, age, sexual orientation, ability/disability, and gender. The skill of taking a research or program need and crafting it into a fundable proposal. Finding the right funder for your project. Writing a successful proposal including developing a budget and budget justification. In this challenging economic time, finding grants to support projects and research is often crucial to project sustainability yet grant funding is becoming increasingly competitive.  Combining over 25 years of experience, the presenters will help grant seekers by breaking down the proposal process into manageable steps. Information will be presented in a practical and organized manner, demystifying the grant proposal process.  This program gives you the tools for developing and writing a successful grant proposal. Megan Delaney PhD Leslie Kooyman PhD                     Grant Writing Proposal Development Funding
112 1 1:30-2:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 408 Eliciting Rich Data in Counseling Research through the Conceptual Mapping Task The Conceptual Mapping Task (CMT) is a wonderful tool for use in qualitative research.  It is easy to learn and generally experienced as a fun and meaningful exercise for participants.  CMT generates rich qualitative data in research and provides a basic interviewing structure for more novice interviewers.  In a single semi-structured interview, participants tell their story, develop a concept map of their lived experience, have the opportunity to create and label themes within their map, and reflect on their map to insure opportunity for filling in missed pieces and validating their spoken experience. /        The presenters will provide a brief rationale and structure for using CMT in qualitative research.  Attendees will have opportunity to participate in an experiential learning exercise, which will involve practice using the tool.  The presenters will also share a sample of conceptual maps generated from their own use of the tool as qualitative researchers. /  This presentation compliments the conference theme in two primary ways: (a) offering an innovative qualitative research tool for counselor education research and teaching scholarship and (b) advancing culturally responsive interviewing strategies. The CMT naturally gives participants opportunity and space to voice and illustrate cultural perspectives.  Additionally, the CMT is a cutting edge tool that has a built-in member-checking feature providing mechanisms for validating results during the interview process. This built in validation process is particularly helpful when access to a participant pool may be limited to the initial interview.  In qualitative research, there are a variety of reasons why post facto member checking may be contraindicated (e.g. lack of funding or acute risk of harm to participants).   Novice and more advanced qualitative interviewers alike will learn how to implement CMT in their own counseling research. / Summarize the rationale and research base for using the conceptual mapping task in qualitative research. Demonstrate how to use the Conceptual Mapping Task in qualitative data collection and analysis. Identify three benefits from in vivo member checking in qualitative research. The Conceptual Mapping Task (CMT) is a wonderful tool for use in qualitative research.  It is easy to learn and generally experienced as a fun and meaningful exercise for participants.  CMT generates rich qualitative data in research and provides a basic interviewing structure for more novice interviewers.  In a single semi-structured interview, participants tell their story, develop a concept map of their lived experience, have the opportunity to create and label themes within their map, and reflect on their map to insure opportunity for filling in missed pieces and validating their spoken experience.  Novice and more advanced qualitative interviewers alike will learn how to implement CMT in their own counseling research. Jonathan Impellizzeri Phd in Counselor Education and Supervision John King PhD in Counselor Education Linda Leitch-Alford Ed.D in Counselor Education and Supervision David Savinsky PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision         Conceptual Mapping Task Qualitative methodology Member checking
113 1 1:30-2:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 411 From Design to Analysis: Navigating Challenges to Longitudinal Repeated Measures Designs with Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) Outcome research is essential to furthering understanding of what’s effective in counseling, counselor education and supervision (Wells, 2014). However, such research presents challenges researchers must adequately address (Raudenbush & Burk, 2002). Repeated measurements over time on the same group  or individual typically result in correlated error that violates assumptions of traditional (between-subjects) analysis of variance and regression models (Tasca & Ramsay, 2010). In addition, these repeated measures approaches discard all participant results having a single missing measurement. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) allows data to still be included as long as it meets the missing-at-random definition (Garson, 2012). Ultimately, HLM allows for dynamic understanding of how variables of interest change over time (Osborn, 2000). The flexibility of HLM makes it particularly relevant to researchers studying smaller samples and populations, such as those of diverse or underrepresented groups, while still retaining statistical power. This methodologically has the ability to improve pedagogy and practice through inclusive and nuanced means. /  This presentation entails lecture and interactive discussion focusing on challenges to, and solutions for, longitudinal repeated measures designs. HLM is introduced as a valuable statistical approach for analyzing correlated data sets such as those involving repeated measures of the same group of counseling students or supervisees over time. An overview of longitudinal designs and statistical approaches will be discussed and a handout provided. Actual research examples will be detailed by way of data from a recent three-year longitudinal study.   / Attendees will obtain practical knowledge about how to design longitudinal repeated measures designs. Attendees will understand limitations of utilizing traditional analysis approaches with longitudinal data structures compared to the value of Hierarchical Linear Modeling. Attendees will learn step-by-step processes for data entry and analyses when using HLM Repeated measures longitudinal designs are important in determining outcomes in clinical and academic settings. However, such designs entail correlated (nested) and incomplete data sets. Hierarchical Linear Modeling allows researchers to formally represent multiple levels and specify how variables at one level influence occurrences at another. This presentation focuses on challenges to, and solutions for, longitudinal repeated measures designs. Handouts are provided and actual research examples will be detailed by way of data from a recent three-year longitudinal study. Sean Roberts Roberts Masters of Science Daniel Stroud PhD Jim McGinley PhD               Longitudinal Outcome Research Hierarchical Linear Modeling
116 1 2:30-3:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 407 An Introduction to Photovoice While Photovoice methodology has been used in other fields for decades, it is just now starting to emerge in the counseling profession. Photovoice is a qualitative, participatory action-oriented advocacy method used to raise critical consciousness by capturing experiences and sharing them with others.  The methodology allows participants’ voices and experiences to be captured in pictures, taken by the participant, while also allowing for accompanying reflections. Providing the power of construct development, voice, and visuals to the participant is empowering across cultures and generations. The goals for this presentation will be to describe Photovoice, the types of research questions it can answer, and how to implement the methodology. The method of delivery will be lecture and presentation, examples of Photovoice methodology and pictures conducted in other studies will be shared, and time will be provided for questions and answer with the audience. Attendees will:  -Understand what Photovoice methodology is Attendees will Understand the types of research questions Photovoice methodology can answer Attendees will Be able to identify and recite the steps used in Photovoice Photovoice is a qualitative, participatory action-oriented advocacy method that is starting to emerge in the counseling profession.  The methodology allows participants’ voices and experiences to be captured in pictures, taken by the participant, while also allowing for accompanying reflections. Providing the power of construct development, voice, and visuals to the participant is empowering across cultures and generations. The goals for this presentation are to describe Photovoice, the types of research questions it can answer, and how to implement the methodology. Examples from Photovoice research will be shared. Heather Trepal Ph.D. Kelly Wester Ph.D.                     Research Photovoice Qualitative
117 1 2:30-3:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 406 The Union of Biometrics and Single Subject Design in Counselor Education Single subject designs provide a tool for counselor educators to empirically test interventions throughout their students’ programs of study. Melding single subject designs with Biometrics’ data as a dependent variable adds a level of complexity to expand the information one can extract from research. The expansion of technology in Biometrics is opening up many more doors as a potential resource.  The purpose of this presentation is to review previous and current work with biometrics, and discuss future possibilities for bringing together single subject design and Biometrics. The presenters will discuss examples of previous research utilizing single subject design and/or biometric measurements with particular emphasis on the methodologies in their respective fields. Additionally, the presenters will report on how they have incorporated both single subject design (Gast, 2010) and Biometrics into their research involving, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (Kabat-Zinn, 2013), and its impact on self-efficacy and anxiety on counseling students. A video of a simulated measurement session will be shown with discussion regarding the IRB process, procedural and methodological concerns, and data collection practices. Finally, the presenters will facilitate an informed discussion on how single subject designs and biometrics can be utilized in future work with quantitative research in Counselor Education. To have an in-depth understanding for the use of Biometrics and single subject design within research. To understand the utility and potential pitfalls in utilizing single subject design and Biometrics. To assist attendees in utilizing single subject designs and/or biometrics within their own research agendas. Single subject designs provide a tool for counselor educators to empirically test educational interventions. Melding single subject designs with Biometrics adds a level of complexity in expanding the information one can extract from research.  This presentation examines past utilization of single subject design and Biometrics, research by the presenters utilizing Biometrics, and explores future work with single subject design and Biometrics within counselor education. Blaine Reilly M.COUN Steven Moody PhD. Chad Yates PhD.               Biometrics Single Subject Design Methodology
118 1 2:30-3:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 405 Procedures, Pitfalls, and Product: The Many Uses of Delphi Methodology in Counselor Education Research The Delphi method is a research methodology developed to improve forecasting procedures and to generate consensus among a group of experts. Known for its versatility, the Delphi method is an effective tool to address various types of research questions. This method can be used to generate uniform understanding, condense complex phenomena, and guide future practice, making it an advantageous methodology for the field of counselor education. Although the Delphi Method is utilized in counseling and counselor education research, little explicit methodological guidance has been provided regarding the design, parameters, and application of this methodology within the field.  /  / The presenters will provide an overview of Delphi methodology and the ways it can be applied to research in counselor education. Specifically, three presenters will provide insight into the Delphi method within the context of three distinct dissertation studies that utilized this methodology. Each presenter will describe their experiences applying the Delphi Method in dissertation research in counselor education, while comparing and contrasting the methodology and results across studies. The presenters will provide an examination of the Delphi Method and facilitate a conversation about the process, procedures, pitfalls, and potential outcomes. This presentation is congruent with the 2015 theme, as rigorous research is the foundation of high quality pedagogy and practice in counselor education.    / This presentation will provide enhanced knowledge of Delphi methodology and its utility in counselor education research. The presenters will describe the various alterations to the methodology and provide explicit methodological guidance regarding the design, parameters, and application of this methodology within counselor education. This presentation will illustrate the various ways the Delphi Method can be applied to research and the diverse outcomes resulting from this methodology. Have you thought about using the Delphi Method yet were unsure due to a lack of methodological guidance? This presentation will provide guidance regarding the design, parameters, potential pitfalls, and application of this methodology. Presenters will discuss the Delphi Method within the context of three distinct dissertation studies, while comparing and contrasting the methodology and results across studies. The presenters will illustrate ways the Delphi Method can be applied and demonstrate the diversity of possible outcomes. Molly Strear MA Lisa Forbes Ph.D. Janessa Parra MA               Delphi Method Dissertation Research Counselor Education
119 1 2:30-3:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 408 Using Q-Methodology to Investigate Pedagogical Practices in Counselor Education Q-methodology was developed by William Stephenson (1935) as a simple, yet innovative adaptation of the traditional factor analysis method developed by Charles Spearman (Watts & Stenner, 2012). This methodology provides a timely flexible research approach across a wide range of settings where the researcher is seeking collective viewpoints on a particular subject matter. This advanced ACES INFORM session will focus on the application of Q-methodology to pedagogical phenomenon in counselor education. Emphasis will be placed on discussing the components of Q-methodology relevant to its application to a Teaching Initiative Task Force study on mentoring counselor education doctoral students in teaching.   /  / Through didactic and experiential approaches, attendees will be exposed to the key concepts and procedural steps for conducting a Q-methodological study including the formation of research questions, building a concourse, participating in the q-sort process, data analysis, and factor interpretation. Additional examples of Q-methodologies from the counselor education literature will also be provided. The goal is for attendees will leave with resources that encourage the use of Q-methodology within their research practices including continued education and mentoring opportunities. / Attendees who actively participate in this session will be more likely to: 1. Recognize the potential Q-methodology when conducting research on pedagogy; 2. Apply Q-Methodological concepts in the formation of research design, and; 3. Transfer the learning from the ACES INFORM to their respective research practices The counselor education literature on teacher preparation practices is emergent. Among the many approaches available, Q-methodology holds promise as a valuable approach to investigating the phenomenon of pedagogy within counselor education. This advanced workshop will engage attendees around the key concepts and procedures of Q-methodology including experiential activities in the context of counselor education pedagogical research. Eric Baltrinic PhD Randall Moate PhD                     Q-Methodology Pedagogy Counselor
120 1 2:30-3:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 411 Which statistical test should I use?  A Refresher in Quantitative Statistical Analysis for Counseling Researchers Graduate students and faculty need to be ready to explain and justify the use of inferential statistics when doing their counseling research. In 2010, a meta-study was done on the CES journal’s last 25 years that identified the statistical analyses most used in their published research articles (Crockett, Byrd, Erford, & Hays, 2010).  Considering the most common quantitative statistical tests identified, we will explore the conditions necessary for using independent and dependent t-tests, ANOVAs/ANCOVAs, linear and multiple regression, correlations, MANOVAs/MANCOVAs.  Factor analysis will be explained with its useful applications. Once data has been collected, astute researchers must know how to clean the data, address outliers, determine independence and normality, and decide if parametric or nonparametric statistical analyses must be used.  This presentation will give guidelines to counseling researchers on how to determine the best quantitative statistical test necessary for properly analyzing data collected in social science research. /  / Crockett, S. A., Byrd, R., Erford, B. T., & Hays, D. G. (2010). Counselor Education and Supervision Golden Anniversary Publication Pattern Review: Author and Article Characteristics From 1985 to 2009. Counselor Education & Supervision, 50(1), 5-20. / Identify the conditions necessary for using the most common quantitative statistical tests in counseling research (e.g. t-tests, ANOVAs/ANCOVAs, correlations, regression, factor analysis) Address outliers, normality, and independence in data collected to determine parametric or nonparametric test Differentiate between good statistical results and improper analyses and conclusions Graduate students and faculty need to be ready to justify the proper use of statistics in their research. The purpose of this presentation is to give guidelines for quantitative statistical tests commonly used in counseling research. We will explore the conditions necessary for using correlations, t-tests, ANOVAs, MANOVAs, regression analysis, and factor analysis. This practical, informative session will also give participants some tools to help distinguish good statistics from improper analyses. Elisabeth Suarez PhD Rhonda Tatum Ladd PhD                     Inferential Statistics Statistical Tests Research
121 1 2:30-3:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 412 A Two-Pronged Approach to Preparing Practitioner-Researchers within a Multi-Track Department Counseling is a complex field that requires research to improve efficacy in services provided to clients and increase understanding of the change process.  There is currently a dearth of practitioner-based research in the field of counseling (Huber & Savage, 2009; Murray, 2009). It is essential for counselor educators to encourage Master’s level students to be good consumers and creators of research (Murray, 2009).  / One counselor education department has worked to develop several options for students in completing a scholarly project. The Scholarly Research Project (SRP) provides students with the ability to complete research in two main avenues; through traditional thesis, program evaluation, or clinical application and evaluation of effectiveness.  / The goal of this educational session is to provide participants with information on how a counselor education department has established and structured a graduation requirement titled Scholarly Research Project.  History of the development, rationale for asking students to complete, and structure of this project will be discussed.  Participants of this interest session can expect to walk away from the presentation with ideas of how to implement and facilitate increased student participation in research, whether that be through traditional research project methods or focusing on theoretical assessment.   / The delivery method used will be traditional educational session.  Presenters will utilize experiential activities, presentation tools, and participant discussion to further understanding and exploration of the topic presented. Provide counselor educators with ideas for increasing scholarly application in their departments Increase understanding of options available to students to accomplish the goal of strengthening practitioner-based research in the future   Counselor educators must prepare master’s level students to be effective consumers and creators of research.  The presenters will explain how one counselor education department developed two research-based options for students: original research or application of research in evaluated practice.  Presenters will discuss project development, design, structure, and evaluation. Participants will gain ideas for facilitating increased student participation in research, whether that be through traditional research project methods or focusing on theoretical assessment. Susan Perkins PhD Melanie Person PhD                     Research Student Development Scholarship
124 1 3:30-4:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 411 Paradigm Shift: How Two Quantitative Researchers Learned to Embrace Qualitative Inquiry (And Grew as Researchers Along the Way) Rationale:  / Most researchers have a preferred paradigm—typically either quantitative or qualitative.  But what happens when the unfolding research process necessitates a shift away from one’s preferred research paradigm?  This presentation shares the experiences of the 2014 CRIGS Fellows, who began with a quantitative plan that transformed into qualitative inquiry as the research process unfolded.  The presentation will describe the rationale for shifting from quantitative to qualitative methodology, challenges in making this transition, strengths in research design resulting from this choice, and skills and lessons learned from this experience.  Applications to overall research practices in Counselor Education will made. / Delivery Method: / Presentation / Program goals: / Describe benefits and liabilities for the use of both quantitative and qualitative research paradigms. / Explore considerations for choosing a research paradigm and describe points at which new information may influence the design of a research study. / Connect the experience of transitioning from quantitative to qualitative research within the context of the CRIGS Fellowship to overall research practices. / Explore challenges faced and benefits gained from stepping outside of one’s preferred research paradigm. / Connection to Theme: / Responding to research questions with the most appropriate methodology, rather than with methodologies preferred by the researcher, aligns with best practices in research, attends to issues of context, and supports developing research skills and practices to engage in both quantitative and qualitative research of high quality that is relevant to and appropriate to the question under study. / Describe benefits and liabilities for the use of both quantitative and qualitative research paradigms in counselor education. Identify considerations for choosing a research paradigm and describe points at which new information may influence the design of a research study. Describe potential challenges faced and benefits gained from stepping outside of one’s preferred research paradigm. This presentation will share the research experiences of the 2014 CRIGS Fellows, which began with a quantitative plan but ultimately transformed into qualitative inquiry in order to appropriately explore the research questions under investigation.  The presentation will describe the rationale for shifting from quantitative to qualitative methodology, challenges in making this transition, strengths in research design resulting from this choice, and skills and lessons learned from this experience.  Applications to overall research practices in Counselor Education will made. Amy Williams M.Ed.                           Research Methodologies  
126 1 3:30-4:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 412 Building scholarship, increasing department funding and support, and enhancing experiential learning opportunities for students through procuring state contracts. This presentation will explain how through social, political and community advocacy initiatives of faculty, our Department of Counselor became connected with key leaders in the Departments of Human Services and Addiction for the county and state.  Through these relationships we have been encouraged to develop proposals to provide services to the local community.  This has culminated in two large contracts, with our Department becoming the Intoxicated Drivers Resource Center (IDRC) for Mercer County, and being selected to serve as a Recovery Support College for the state.  The IDRC is the required 12-hour class for anyone who received a DUI charge in Mercer County.  A portion of this class requires an assessment of each individual and determination if further treatment is warranted. Our graduate students conduct these assessments, and co-facilitate the psychoeducation groups.  The revenue from this program supports additional faculty travel and a Graduate Assistant to support faculty scholarship.  The Recovery Support grant funds the hiring of a LCADC through our training clinic, development of an Environmental Strategies taskforce to change the environment on campus as it relates to alcohol and other drug use, the development of a residential recovery house for students in recovery, and the hiring of a late night activities coordinator to provide alcohol and other drug free activities on key drinking nights. Graduate students will provide individual and group counseling to students in recovery. CE Departments are uniquely qualified to seek such county and statewide partnerships which will help colleges serve their local communities, while providing students with experiential learning and faculty with scholarship opportunities. 1. Faculty will look beyond grants and explore contracts as viable sources of revenue, scholarship and student learning opportunities. 2. Faculty will appreciate and reframe the relationships cultivated through community engagement and social/political advocacy. 3. Build an appreciation for the value of community engaged learning in clinical CE courses. This presentation will explain how through social, political and community advocacy initiatives of faculty, our Department of Counselor became connected with key leaders in the Departments of Human Services and Addiction for the county and state.  I will share how these relationships have supported our successful application for county and state contracts that provide students with experiential learning and faculty with scholarship opportunities and revenue to support further research. Sandy Gibson PhD Stuart Roe PhD Mark Woodford Phd               Contracts Funding Experiential Learning
127 1 3:30-4:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 405 Methods of Establishing Psychometric Properties of Rubrics With the educational assessment movement rubrics are fast becoming a widely used assessment tool for research in education and counseling.  Yet, many published rubrics have little evidence of reliability and validity.   The purpose of this program is to discuss methodological issues for the development of rubrics and the establishment of reliability and validity for rubrics.   / The key program goal is to illuminate issues researchers face in the establishment of content validity, inter-rater reliability, and concurrent validity of rubrics.  The presenters will discuss the establishment of a blueprint for the tool, designing items, developing evidence for content validity, piloting items, analyzing items, tool revision, selecting a training protocol for inter-rater reliability, and determining methods of establishing concurrent validity. The program will include discussion of the establishment of reliability and validity for the Counselor-in-Training Dispositions Assessment, a rubric designed to assist counselor educators in dispositional assessment and gatekeeping of counselors-in-training.  Methods of overcoming the criticism of cultural bias in rubrics will be discussed. / The delivery method will be a power point presentation, review of a manuscript as an illustration, and participant discussion. The program fits the conference theme in that the program design addresses practice strategies.  Also, diversity criticisms related to rubrics will be explored. / 1. To increase participant understanding of research methodology for establishing content validity, inter-rater reliability, and concurrent validity of rubrics. 2. To illustrate the establishment of psychometric properties of rubrics and manuscript development by reviewing a psychometric research article conducted on the Counselor-In-Training Dispositions Assessment (CTDA). 3. To engage the audience in meaningful discussion. Rubrics are becoming more widely accepted for counseling and educational research, yet the establishment of psychometric properties of rubrics is lagging behind the actual use of rubrics.  Come join us for a discussion of methodologies for establishing content validity, inter-rater reliability, and concurrent validity for rubrics.  A manuscript describing the psychometric properties of a counselor education dispositions and gatekeeping tool (the CTDA) will be used to illustrate manuscript development. Brenda Freeman Ph.D. Curtis Garner Ed.D.                     rubrics reliability validity
125 1 3:30-4:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 408 Single Case Research Design: Choosing the Right Design for Your Research Single case research design (SCRD) is an experimental method of study designed to investigate the relationship between intervention and effects. The application of SCRD offers counseling practitioners and researchers a practical and viable method for evaluating the effectiveness of interventions that target behavior, emotions, personal characteristics and other counseling-related constructs of interest. In order for counselor educators to offer leadership for culturally relevant pedagogy and practice, they benefit from knowledge of evidence-based practices with clients and students. Well-designed SCRDs allow counselor educators to provide credible evidence for their teaching and clinical practices. Due to the individual nature of SCRD, counselors who have limited resources available for research can utilize this method to contribute to evidence of effectiveness or evaluation of practices.  The goal of this presentation is to present the mechanics, rationale and purpose of potential designs within the SCRD methodologies. The presenter will offer the benefits and limitations of SCRD designs when applied to counseling research. Participants will learn SCRD designs that are best matched to their research agendas and will understand how to practically implement their chosen designs. The presenter will utilize didactic presentation of material using real-life examples and tools available to participants, as well as discussion of participants’ research interests. 1. Participants will be able to identify multiple research designs within SCRD methodologies. 2. Participants will learn practical implementation of SCRD methods. 3. Participants will be able to identify single case designs that suit their research agendas in the classroom and clinical practice. Single case research design (SCRD) is an experimental method of study designed to investigate the relationship between intervention and effects. The goal of this presentation is to present the purpose, rationale and mechanics of potential designs within the SCRD methodologies. The presenter will offer the benefits and limitations of SCRD designs when applied to counseling research. Participants will learn SCRD designs that are best matched to their research agendas and will understand how to practically implement their chosen designs with students and clients. Dee Ray PhD                           single-case design scrd research
122 1 3:30-4:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 406 Introduction to Multi-level Regression Modeling In this session, I will introduce an advanced version of regression analysis called Multi-level Regression Modeling to both doctoral students and researchers. This analysis is relatively common among social science studies. / When data is organized into hierarchal structure, ordinary regression analysis can provide less accurate results.  For example, in this type of data set,  individuals are nested in family units, which in turn are nested in communities. Depression can be predicted by individual-level  variable (eg.  gender, race, early childhood trauma, age) , family-level variables (eg., family income level, family cohesion), and community-level variables (eg., neighborhood safety, urban vs. rural ).  In order to analyze this type of data set, we have to use Multi-level Regression Modeling, instead.  / Multi-level Regression Modeling is basically just an extension of ordinary regression analysis. However, it can answer interesting/complex questions related to each level as well as cross-level interactions among variables between different levels.       / In this PowerPoint presentation, audience will learn basic concepts of Multi-level Regression Modeling (including model building and interpretation) as well as some advanced considerations.    Simple examples will be used to illustrate the process with various visual aids.  The mathematical explanation will be kept at minimum, but basic mathematical understanding of ordinary (multiple) regression analysis is expected. Audience will learn basic concepts of Multi-level Regression Modeling (including model building and interpretation of the result). Audience will learn advanced considerations of Multi-level Regression Modeling (eg., Theoretical and Practical tips; limitations).   When data is organized into a hierarchal structure (eg., individuals-family-community), ordinary regression analysis can provide less accurate results.  Instead, we have to use Multi-level Regression Model.  It is basically an extension of ordinary regression analysis. However, it can answer interesting/ complex questions related to variables at different levels.   / In this session, audience will learn basic concepts of Multi-level Regression Modeling and some advanced considerations. Simple examples and various visual aids will be used to help audience’s understanding. Hideyuki Tanaka Ph.D.                           Statistics advanced Regression Analysis multi-level data
123 1 3:30-4:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 407 Phenomenological Research: New Conceptual and Methodological Approaches In this presentation, I will discuss phenomenological methods and offer recommendations for designing a phenomenological study, gathering qualitative data, and analyzing findings. I will also address philosophical foundations of phenomenology. This presentation will also include an introduction to post-intentional and post-structural approaches to phenomenological research. Key terms and concepts will be described and trustworthiness, credibility, confirmability, and phenomenological bracketing will be covered. I will discuss ethical issues, multicultural concerns, strategies for managing researcher bias, and data analysis techniques. In addition, I will review contemporary research and philosophical literature to support a “phenomenology of the event,” which applies innovative philosophical ideas to phenomenological methods. The presentation will conclude with an exercise to demonstrate ways to apply phenomenological research in counselor education and supervision contexts. Moreover, I will address ways that phenomenological research informs a culturally relevant pedagogy. The goals of this presentation include providing an overview of phenomenological research methods, discussing ethical, multicultural, and procedural concerns of the design, introducing new conceptual approaches to phenomenological research, and addressing applications to the fields of counseling and counselor education. I will develop a power point presentation, offer references, and provide handouts. Describe phenomenological research Discuss ethical, multicultural, and procedural concerns Discuss the application of new conceptual approaches to phenomenology In this presentation, I will discuss phenomenological methods and offer recommendations for designing a study, gathering data, and analyzing findings. The goals of this presentation include providing an overview of phenomenological research, discussing ethical, multicultural, and procedural concerns, introducing new conceptual approaches, and addressing applications to counseling and counselor education. I will develop a power point presentation, offer references, and provide handouts. Joel Givens MA                           Phenomenological Research Methods
128 1 4:30-5:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 408 Supporting Communities through Program Evaluation: Getting Started Rationale:  Counselor educators can be tremendous agents of social change when they partner with community-based counseling and guidance groups. This presentation will illustrate how to program evaluation activities link counselor educators to communities by providing introductory and intermediate strategies to design evaluation practices that fit program needs. These activities not only strengthen communities, but also encourage prudent assessment and research practices.   / Program Goals:  The goals of this program are to: 1) illustrate strategies for forming community-based partnerships, 2) provide an introductory framework for understanding program assessment and evaluation practices and their relationship to evidence-supported practices, 3) educate attendees about three paradigms for evaluation (single group, between groups, and single-case research designs) and when each is indicated, and 4) discuss considerations for reporting outcomes to community stakeholders. Presentation content will be illustrated using examples from the presenter’s experiences as a consultant in school, agency, and private practice settings. Attendees will be provided with handouts that support identifying research questions, variables of interest, and evaluation strategies relevant to their communities.   / Connection to Conference Theme: All session content will be developed and presented to emphasize cultural sensitivity and social justice issues associated with pluralistic views of program success. / describe the importance of research in promoting social justice and advocacy identify 3 methods for completing outcome-based program evaluation and understand how the findings inform program modifications implement culturally-relevant strategies for interpreting and reporting the results of program evaluation studies This presentation will provide a rationale for partnering with local community-based counseling and guidance programs to promote their productivity and permanence. This brief primer will (a) provide an introductory framework for understanding program evaluation practices and how this relates to supporting community agencies and initiatives, (b) introduce 3 paradigms for evaluation and when each is indicated, and (c) discuss considerations for reporting outcomes to stakeholders. Stephen Lenz Ph.D., LPC                           Program Evaluation Outreach  
131 1 4:30-5:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 411 Mixed Methodology in Counseling Research The purpose of this session is to provide an overview of designing, conducting, and reporting mixed methods research (MMR) in educational and social science research.  The workshop is presented as a primer to MMR via a questioning format: What is mixed research? When, where, by whom, and how mixed research is conducted? And, how might we mentor and be mentored as a mixed methodology researcher?  /  / The session will address the need for counselors to utilize mixed method designs to understand a more complete picture (Smith, 2012) and to initiate mixed methods-like thinking, which recognizes the conflicting positions of problem solving that can lead to new learning (Johnson & Gray, 2010). This session is an interactive live workshop based on the idea that knowledge sources stem from people (i.e., participants) and is generated by people (i.e., researchers, authors) both of whom represent all cultures, races, ethnic backgrounds, languages, classes, religions, and other diversity attributes. Therefore, reflective practices are integrated in the session for participants to use a critical lens approach for culturally relevant pedagogy and practice.  The session is organized into four general areas—research formulation, research planning, research implementation, and research dissemination—including elements for understanding, conducting, and reporting mixed methodology research.  / • Evaluate the use of mixed methods and relevant contexts to conduct this research • Explore areas of counseling research and practice that benefit by the use of mixed research • Examine ways to network for support and mentoring in quantitative or qualitative areas This interactive session focuses on the basics of mixed methods as a research tradition addressing the questions: What is mixed research? When, where, by whom, is it conducted? How might counselor researchers mentor and be mentored in mixed methods?  /  / Standards for designing, conducting, and reporting mixed research in educational and social science settings will be discussed. Further, participants will recognize and create strategies to integrate conflicting positions to better address culturally relevant research pedagogy and practice. Handouts include resources and tools for teaching, conducting, and disseminating mixed research. / Rebecca Frels PhD                           methodology mixed methods research
132 1 4:30-5:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 412 Conducting Content Analysis in Counselor Education and Supervision Research Despite the long tradition of content analysis in counseling research, little uniformity exists in how this approach is utilized. Contributing to the complexity of using this approach are various inductive and deductive coding approaches and a multitude of non-traditional “texts” available to researchers, including web content and transcripts of supervision. /  / The purpose of this ACES INFORM 50-minute Education Session is to provide participants with a systemic framework for conducting content analysis reflecting best practices within the counseling and counselor education literature for designing, coding, and analyzing content analysis research. The session will be delivered by lecture with each presenter providing examples from their research to illustrate how to apply this framework to novel and underexplored research topics within counselor education and supervision. During this presentation, an emphasis will be placed on engaging participants to share and reflect on how content analysis can be applied to their own research questions. /  / In order for counselor educators and supervisors to be leaders, it is essential that they conduct research that produces valid and meaningful results. This ACES INFORM educational session will provide participants with a model for conducting content analysis that can contribute to the development of culturally relevant pedagogy and practice. Participants will be able to define the key steps in conducting content analysis. Participants will be able to distinguish between the different content analysis frameworks found in the counseling literature. Participants will be able to describe strategies to improve the methodological rigor of content analysis. Content analysis is a methodological approach that holds promise in examining pedagogy and practice in counselor education and supervision. During this session, a framework for content analysis, informed by both quantitative and qualitative traditions, will be presented. Steps in conducting content analysis will be described using examples drawn from the counseling literature. Examples will include analyzing website content as well as transcripts of supervision sessions. Edward Wahesh Ph.D. Lucy Purgason PhD Janee' Avent PhD               content analysis research methods  
133 1 4:30-5:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 405 A Structured and Systemic Model for Literature Reviews: Cultivating Success for Emergent Scholars The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) sets standards to prepare graduates to work as counselor educators, supervisors, researchers, and practitioners. As it is clearly stated in the guidelines for Research and Scholarship in the 2009 CACREP standards (p. 55), doctoral students must be exposed to research methods, analysis, assessment and evaluation, and therefore become proficient in scholarly writing and publications. Moreover, it is implied that the scholarly development will occur in sequential manner as a result of research exposure. However, in order to achieve levels of competence in research writing, grant proposal writing, program development and evaluation; emergent scholars need to formulate appropriate and meaningful research questions, informed by the current state of the literature. Literature reviews are part of the completion of doctoral courses in the form of final papers. Unfortunately, many students lack research experience and encounter difficulties in understanding, discerning, and processing the amount of existing literature in ways that allow them to generate innovative and meaningful conceptual manuscripts and research questions that enhance the advancement of the field. In this INFORM session, the presenter will focus on manuscript development and research questions formulation, based on a structured and systemic understanding of the existing literature in the participants’ study area. To engage participants in the discussion of terms, concepts, variables, and research methods in their field of interest To present and discuss structured models for literature reviews that lead emergent scholars to in-depth knowledge of their topic area and meaningful research question formulation To apply tips for synthesis of research in a topic area and ideas for future research The importance of scholarly competence in Counselor Education doctoral students has been emphasized in the guidelines for Research and Scholarship in the 2009 CACREP standards. However, doctoral students come to their programs with different levels of preparation and exposure to research. This INFORM session is focused on manuscript development and research questions formulation, based on the application of literature reviews models in the participants’ study area. Michele Lopez MS                           Emergent Scholars Literature Reviews Research Question Formulation
cancelled? 1 4:30-5:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 406 Participatory Action Research: Making Socially Just Research Pragmatic in Counselor Education. Participatory Action Research (PAR) is a qualitative research method that empowers participants to be an active part of the research process.  PAR allows research participants to be full partners in the research process, and the end product. However, in the academic environment its emphasis on advocacy and justice, rather than manuscript production can create tensions for researchers who must publish. As the fields of counseling and counselor education continue to shift to a broader, more socially just focus, creating space for non-traditional research is critical.  /  / The main purpose of this presentation is to describe PAR and some of its more familiar techniques and to discuss the roles this type of research can play in the fields of counseling and counselor education. The first presenter of this session has experience with PAR and will share a study on homeless queer identified youth of color that utilized PAR, specifically photovoice and utilized the work to advocate for a homeless program.  /  / This session will include a description and discussion of the basics of PAR, a demonstration of the technique based on the research of the first presenter, and a discussion of qualitative research in the field. The presentation will utilize a combination of lecture and discussion to share the information.  / Participants will be able to describe participatory action research and the beneficial roles it can play in counseling and counselor education. Participants will be able to articulate the challenges of implementing this research method as counselors and counselor educators. Participants will be able to discuss strategies for promoting both idealistic and pragmatic research in counseling and counselor education. The main purpose of this presentation is to describe Participatory Action Research (PAR) and some of its more familiar techniques and to discuss the roles this type of research can play in the fields of counseling and counselor education. This session will include a description and discussion of the basics of PAR, a demonstration of the technique based on the research of the first presenter, and a discussion of qualitative research in the field. Jennifer Preston PhD Deborah Rubel PhD                     Participatory action research Qualitative methods Advocacy
130 1 4:30-5:20 Wednesday, October 7, 2015 407 Observation Oriented Modelling: A powerful New Data Analysis Tool for Counseling Research Quantitative research has been criticized because it does not have the human being for its subject, but estimated population parameters, etc.  A significant number of serious criticisms have been raised and then illustrated by equal number of contradictory studies and anomalous results (such as supposed ESP at p<.05 in a leading psychology journal) which seem to defeat the purpose of social science as science.  There is also a sense that social science theories and paradigms go in and out of style without any real or substantial progress, as in the hard sciences.   /  / This program will explain Observation Oriented Modelling, a new and easy-to-use analytical tool, which allows us to develop holistic models of human behavior and experience, using either quantitative or qualitative data.  The second half of the program will lead attendees as they work through a representative example.  /  / Goals of the program: 1. Fix clearly in attendees minds the weaknesses and pitfalls of aggregate research (something that a majority of psychologists and counselors do not currently have).    2. Remind participants of the philosophy of counseling and show how this philosophy demands new and more human-centered methods of research and data analysis.  3.  Explain and demonstrate one instance of such a new method of data analysis, Observation Oriented Modelling. /  / Delivery Methods: Lecture with slides will be the method of the first part of the presentation; in the second part, attendees will be asked to work through a representative example. Identify 3 commonly misunderstood weaknesses of aggregate research. Explain how the philosophy of counseling requires new and rigorous methods of human-centered research Demonstrate working familiarity with Observation Oriented Modelling, a new human-centered method of data analysis Counseling, with its philosophy of wellness, development, and prevention, is the most human-centered of the social sciences.  Other social sciences have given us more and more complex methods of data analysis, but also seem to lead us further and further away from the human as human.  Counseling needs a holistic, human-centered science.  This program points out all-too-common problems with aggregate research, and presents a new and promising data analysis method, Observation Oriented Modelling, which is holistic and human centered, but also easy to use and inexpensive. Frederick Boley MA                           data-analysis modelling research
                                                           
136 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 401 Incorporating Harm Reduction Treatment into your Substance Abuse and Addictions courses: What you need to know This workshops examines the implementation of Harm Reduction Treatment into Substance Abuse and Drug and Alcohol Counseling courses. Basic information on Harm Reduction will be provided including the core elements of Harm Reduction Treatment, how it works with abstinence-based models of recovery, and how to incorporate Harm Reduction Treatment into your existing curriculum as another addiction recovery model for all forms of addictions. With relapse rates in the field of addiction work remaining high when clients utilize standard abstinence-based models of recovery, and as more research is conducted on process addictions, it is important to explore alternative approaches to recovery and to provide these various models to students in the classroom. Harm Reduction Treatment is a client-centered, counselor guided, empowering approach to recovery from addiction that is able to increase client insight and decrease relapse rates. Incorporating various pedagogical approaches to your courses will assure students receive relevant and up-to-date information on the latest approaches to the practice of addiction counseling. The goal of this workshop is to assist professors in appropriately developing curriculum for their substance abuse and addiction courses that includes Harm Reduction Treatment, in addition to other non-abstinence based models of recovery, in order to provide students, and future clinicians, with a broad range of options when counseling individuals who present with these primary issues. This interactive workshop will provide an opportunity for attendees to ask questions about implementation of course design and activities for both traditional courses as well as online formats. 1. Attendees will increase their knowledge of Harm Reduction Treatment and how Harm Reduction Treatment works with other models of recovery. 2. Attendees will be provided tools to incorporate Harm Reduction Treatment into existing curriculum. 3. Attendees will increase resource list for Harm Reduction Treatment. This workshops examines the implementation of Harm Reduction Treatment into Substance Abuse and Drug and Alcohol Counseling courses. Basic information on Harm Reduction will be provided including the core elements of Harm Reduction Treatment, how it works with abstinence-based models of recovery, and how to incorporate Harm Reduction Treatment into your existing curriculum as another addiction recovery model for all forms of addictions. With relapse rates in the field of addiction work remaining high when clients utilize standard abstinence-based models of recovery, and as more research is conducted on process addictions, it is important to explore alternative approaches to recovery and to provide these various models to students in the classroom. Harm Reduction Treatment is a client-centered, counselor guided, empowering approach to recovery from addiction that is able to increase client insight and decrease relapse rates. Incorporating various pedagogical approaches to your courses will assure students receive relevant and up-to-date information on the latest approaches to the practice of addiction counseling. Ami Hooper-Knox Ed.D.                           Addiction Harm Reduction Teaching
135 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 309 An Affirming Approach to Supervision: Working with LGBQ Supervisees and Clients Research has shown that addressing issues related to sexual orientation in supervision can increase the supervisee’s competence (Aducci & Baptist, 2011; Burkard, Knox, Hess, & Schultz, 2009) and level of satisfaction with supervision (Burkard et al., 2009; Phillips & Fischer, 1998). Further, it can improve the supervisory relationship (Aducci & Baptist, 2011; Halpert & Pfaller, 2001; Pfohl, 2004) while enhancing the therapeutic experience for clients (Halpert & Pfaller, 2001; Luke & Goodrich, 2012). This same body of research demonstrates how LGBQ+ affirmative models of supervision work to ensure safety of LGBQ+ clients, support identity development of supervisees and clients. LGBQ+ affirmative supervision also provides supervisees with a richer understanding of the many issues pertaining to sexual minorities such as heterosexism, discrimination, stigma, etc.  The goal of this program is to promote awareness and knowledge of LGBQ+ affirmative supervision and to provide the tools necessary for supervisors to integrate this lens when working with supervisees. Identify and describe the foundational elements of LGBQ+ affirmative therapy. Identify and understand the components of LGBQ+ affirmative clinical supervision. Describe ways to promote diversity and contribute to social justice for the LGBQ+ population, including how to facilitate affirmative environments in clinical practice and supervision. Learn the foundation of LGBQ+ affirmative therapy and how to implement it in clinical supervision. Discover how to increase supervisees’ competence and level of satisfaction with supervision; improve the supervisory relationship and therapeutic experience for clients; and address many issues pertaining to sexual minorities such as heterosexism, discrimination, stigma, etc. Jared S. Rose MA Amy M. Moore MAEd Melanie Kautzman-East MSEd Shawn Burton MSEd Robert Schwartz     Supervision LGBTQ+ Affirmative
137 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 411 Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Conceptual Model for Counselor Education Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a complex developmental disorder that affects 1 and 68 children; 30% higher than the 2012 findings. Due to the increase of early detection of ASD, counseling professionals will be a part of this process and must be knowledgeable in the countless issues pertaining to family and individual treatment of ASD. Further, counselors must be aware of the potential threats to support including factors related to socioeconomic status, spousal relations, availability of social support, and the number of children with disabilities. Thus, counselor education needs to address ASD throughout the training of students to ensure competent professionals. We have an ethical obligation as a profession to be a part of the interdisciplinary force behind holistically viewing the client and their family. Participants will be informed on the: a) lack of research in the counseling field related to how counselors can be effective in the treatment of ASD; b) introduced to a conceptual model for counselors to utilize when beginning treatment with ASD; and c) outline the importance of training students for ASD in counselor education. Upon completion of the presentation, participants will demonstrate an understanding of culturally relevant practices for children on the spectrum as well as their families. Participants will receive a copy of the PowerPoint, be involved in experiential exercises as well as, relevant references and resources for additional information. Participants will be informed on the lack of research in the counseling field related to how counselors can be effective in the treatment of individuals with ASD. Participants will demonstrate an understanding of the provided conceptual model for individual treatment of ASD. Participants will be introduced to the lack of research outlining the importance of training students for this special population in counselor education. Counselor Education & Supervision typically does not address Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), even though ASD is the fifth leading diagnosis in children (CDC, 2013). This presentation will: (a) provide an overview of challenges facing those with ASD, as well as their families; (b) provide a summary of individual interventions for children diagnosed with ASD; (c) offer a conceptual model of individual interventions for addressing a child diagnosed with ASD; and (d) future implications for counselors and counselor educators if ASD is not addressed in the counseling profession. Katherine Feather M.A. Clinical Mental Health Counseling                           Autism Spectrum Disorder Counselor Education Interventions
138 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 302 Avoiding Death By PowerPoint Avoiding Death by PowerPoint is designed to provide a framework for utilizing PowerPoint to its best advantage.  Best practices developed for PowerPoint will be presented along with tips that come from the presenter’s 275 counseling conference and invited presentations.  The goal is to help attendees plan future classroom and conference presentations that utilize PowerPoint to enhance the session rather than to unintentionally bore, distract, or frustrate students or participants. /  / This presentation will include such topics as: attending to best practices in pedagogical theory, utilizing a variety of mediums other than the written word, focusing on creativity, the use of whitespace, and providing electronic access to participants. /  / The presenter has presented over 275 national and international conference and invited sessions using PowerPoint.  As importantly, he has attended over 500 sessions by other presenters which has provided the chance to see what works and does not work when using PowerPoint.  Finally, the presenter regularly searches the literature to keep up with best practices in PowerPoint in order to continually improve his presentation skills. /  / This presentation fits in nicely with the conference theme “ACES Leadership for Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Practice."  Attending to the needs of those with auditory and visual disabilities when using PowerPoint will be incorporated into the presentation as will approaches to avoid violating the cultural norms of attendees.  The need to attend to diverse learning styles will also be addressed.   / To learn best practices and maximize the benefits of PowerPoint in classroom and conference presentations. To incorporate PowerPoint into classroom and conference presentations in a way that maximizes learning outcomes. To provide helpful ideas and best practices about using PowerPoint for counselor educators to bring back to their students. Have you ever worried that your use of PowerPoint might be unintentionally boring, distracting, or frustrating students or conference participants?  Has anyone ever taught you PowerPoint presentation skills?  This session presents best practices in PowerPoint gleaned from both the literature and the presenter’s 275 counseling conference and invited presentations.  Come away feeling that you know how to prepare a PowerPoint presentation that truly enhances your future classroom and conference presentations. David Kaplan PhD                           PowerPoint Pedagogy Best practices
139 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 412 The Role of Cultural Identity Development in Cross-cultural Supervision With increasing diversity of the population of the United States, there are also increasing numbers of diverse counselors-in-training, and new counselors enter the profession. There are calls by the American Counseling Association through the ACA Code of Ethics (2014) and accreditation bodies such as the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs (CACREP, 2009) for multiculturally competent counselors and counselors-in-training. According to Burkard et al., (2006) supervisors need to be culturally sensitive, and need to have acquired multicultural competency skills. This enables supervisees to feel safe enough to bring up sensitive cultural issues, such as those related to race, during supervision. However, it is difficult to realize this expectation. Not every counselor who is in the field possesses these competences. Additionally, some counselor educators also lack these competences, in spite of the fact that these same educators are charged with supervision of developing counselors. In cross-cultural supervision, it is the supervisor who needs to bring up issues related to differences at the earliest opportunity (Estrada, Frame, & Williams, 2004).This contributes to the development of a trusting supervisee/supervisor relationship.  One of the most important concepts in cross-cultural supervision is that of cultural identity development. Studies show that cultural identity development is important in cross-cultural supervision: supervisors with developed cultural identity are more effective in working with supervisees who are different from them (Cook, 1994; Gatmon et al., 2001; Constantine, Warren, & Miville, 2005). They are able to effectively talk about differences early during relationship development, which increases the level of trust among supervisees. On the other hand, in cross-cultural supervision if the supervisee has a more highly developed cultural identity the relationship will not be productive, and the supervisee might be frustrated due to the inability of the supervisor to address issues related to their cultural and/or racial differences (Estrada, Frame & Williams, 2004).  / Program goals: a) Situate the importance of cultural identity development in cross-cultural supervision; b) Share three models of cultural identity development c) Encourage participants to start thinking about their own cultural identity development.. / Delivery methods: Discussion using PowerPoint presentation, and experiential exercise in which participants will use appropriate cultural identity development models to identify where they fall in the model. / This presentation is connected to the conference because presenter will impart knowledge about the importance of cultural identity development models and help participants to locate where they are in the appropriate model. Hopefully this will help them to be more effective in their work as supervisors of diverse counselors. Describe the importance of cultural identity development in cross-cultural supervision List three cultural identity development models Use a relevant cultural identity development model to identity where each participant falls in the model The presenter will lead a discussion on the role of cultural identity development in cross-cultural supervision. She will ask participants to use a relevant cultural identity development model as an experiential activity to identify where each participant falls within the model. The presenter will facilitate a discussion on the implications of understanding one’s cultural identity development. Evadne Ngazimbi PhD                           Cultural identity development Cross-cultural supervision Supervisor
141 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 304 Development of the perception of competence to work with suicidal clients Proposal Description & Connection to Conference Theme: More lives are lost to suicide on a yearly basis than from war, conflict, and natural disasters combined. Counselor Education programs are expected to prepare students for careers working with diverse clients with real-world issues.  However, CACREP requires only minimal standards for training students to be able to work with clients who are suicidal.  This presentation addresses new qualitative research on the process through which new counselors develop the perception of competence to work with suicidal clients.  The research offers an examination of the lived experience of developing competence and advocates for competency-based counselor training in Counselor Education programs. Implications for counselor educators and clinical supervisors for working with counseling students and novice counselors will also be explored. Goals: 1. To describe the process through which counselors develop the perception of competence to work with suicidal clients with implications for Counselor Education programs and clinical supervisors 2. To examine the lived experience of counseling students in working with suicidal clients and clients-in-crisis with implications for Counselor Education programs and clinical supervisors 3. To advocate for development of competency-based training for counseling students Delivery Method: 50-minute Education Session with discussion and questions/answers Participants will be introduced to research findings on the process in which new counselors develop the perception of competence to assess and manage suicide risk Participants will learn the educational and supervisory implications of working with students and novice counselors in treating suicide ideation and behaviors Participants will understand ways that Counselor Education programs and supervisors can assist students and novice counselors in their development of competence to treat suicide There is a growing need for counselor competence to treat suicide ideation and intent in clients. This session explores recent research on the unique experience of beginning counselors in the process of developing the perception of competency to assess and to treat suicide issues. Implications for counselor educators and supervisors working with novice counselors will also be discussed. Richard Audsley MA Greggory Elliott MA Adriana De Raet MA Ashley Pechek MA Lisa Runck MA Angelica Valdez, MA, Adams State University. Suicide Crisis Competency
143 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 307 International Counseling Traits: Identifying Counseling Traits Ranked Most Important by International Counseling Professionals through Q Sort Analysis Research has shown an increase in the study and discussion of international counseling throughout the past decade in the mental health community. This proposal highlights the increased need for the counseling profession to ‘stand in the gap’ as suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO, 2012), and take steps to promote counseling services to those in need throughout the global community. An overview and description of the needs are reviewed and discussed as reported by the WHO, along with the response of organizations, such as the National Board for Certified Counselors International (NBCC –I, 2011), who continue to support efforts toward counselor development and advocacy. /  / The presentation addresses the research question, “What personal and professional counseling traits are considered most important for counselors serving in international settings, as determined by counselor practitioners and educators with demonstrated international experience?”  The study utilized a Q-methodology research design in order to understand what international counseling professionals consider to be the most important traits for counselors to consider in international settings. Two phases of the study produced input from international counseling experts and other international counseling professionals, which are described in detail. /  / Results of the survey are presented in order to discuss traits ranked highest among the professional counseling experts and professionals. Conclusions and discussions center on ways in which the information may be useful for counselor educators and trainers who will be preparing student counselors to serve at an international counseling settings. / Distinguish four core areas associated with international counseling within the counseling profession Identify the most important traits for international counseling professionals Consider ways in which international counseling traits will be promoted among counselor educators and trainers The counseling field continues expanding further into countries and cultures with inadequate access to trained professionals in counseling and mental health. In order to demonstrate the kind of support and growth counseling professionals have to offer, proper training would ideally promote counseling traits considered most important for impacting people of different cultures. The research conducted in this study identified the counseling traits ranked most important by international counseling professionals through a Q sort analysis. The research results will be used to facilitate further discussions for how to implement a variety of international counseling traits, and what this means for the future of the counseling profession throughout the world. Nathan Perron MA                           international counseling traits Q sort
145 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 308 The Mental Health and Well-being of Refugee Youth: From Trauma to Resilience-Based Focus Type of Program: Educational Session /  / Title: The Mental Health and Well-being of Refugee Youth: From Trauma-Focused to Resilience-based Approaches /  / Program Description: /  / A. Rationale / The escalation of wars in different continents has led to constant migration of refugees to other countries for resettlement. It has been documented that nearly half of the displaced persons are children and adolescents under the age of 18 (Halcon et. al., 2004; UNHCR, 2007). Migration of refugees from their original home countries to new environments can be a risky process in general. For refugee youth who have been considered as among the  “at-risk groups” (Bemak, Chung, & Pedersen, 2003), the entire migration process may be even riskier due to the dual transition-as newcomers in a new environment as well as navigating their normative developmental processes (Kovacev & Shute, 2004). Indeed, the myriad developmental and cultural challenges, coupled with pre- and post-migration trauma encountered by refugee youth has led to some youth developing a host of mental and psychological problems, including post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, depression just to mention a few (Barenbaum, Ruchkin, & Schwab-Stone, 2004; Berthold, 2000; Layne et al., 2001; Huemer et al., 2013). Understandably, for a long time researchers’ main focus with refugee youth has been a trauma-focused approach, that is, the diagnoses and suggestions for treatment of mental health problems presented in counseling (.Ellis, Macdonald, Lincoln, & Cabral, 2008;  Layne et al., 2001; Entholt, Smith, & Yule, 2005; Smith, Perrin, Yule, Hacam, & Stuvland, 2002). The presenter will highlight some of these mental health problems and strategies for interventions that have been found efficacious with refugee youth from different cultural backgrounds. /  / Researchers also have found that not all refugee youth develop mental health problems due to prior traumatic experiences or present challenges in countries of resettlement (Amone P’O-lak, 2007; Halcon et al., 2004). On the contrary, some refugee youth have been found to be resilient in the face of adversities. Consequently, there has been a call for a paradigm shift in addressing the mental health and well-being of refugee youth in resettlement. The outcome has led to reviews of the risk and protection factors of refugee youth in resettlement, including addressing not only trauma, but also the psychosocial aspects that contribute to successful adaptation (Fazel, Reed, Panter-Brick & Stein, 2012). Other researchers have poignantly addressed resilience in different areas of refugee youth as benchmarks to refugee youth mental health and well-being (Betancourt & Khan, 2008; Haene, Grietens, & Vershueren, 2007; Montgomery, 2010; Sleijpen, Heide, Mooren, Boeije, & Kleber, 2013). Thus, another main purpose of this program is to address the main aspects of resilience and what makes some refugee youth resilient in the face of adversities. These elements of resilience and how they manifest in refugee youth may be different due to the diverse cultural identities represented by refugee youth. /  /  / References /  / Amone-P’Olak, K. (2007). Coping with life in rebel captivity and the challenge of  /     reintegrating formerly abducted boys in Northern Uganda. Journal of Refugee Studies,  /     20, 641-661. / Barenbaum, J., Ruchkin, V., & Schwab-Stone, M. (2004). The psychosocial aspects of  /     children exposed to war: Practice and policy. Journal of Child Psychology and  /     Psychiatry, 45, 41-62. / Bemak, F., Chung, R.C-Y., & Pedersen, P. (2003). Counseling refugees: A psychosocial  /      approach to innovative multicultural interventions. Westport, CT: Greenwood.   / Betancourt, T. S., & Khan, K. T. (2008). The mental health of children affected by armed  /     conflict: Protective processes and pathways to resilience. International Review of Psychiatry,  /     20, 317-328. / Berthold, S. M. (2000). War traumas and community violence: Psychological, behavioral,  /     and academic outcomes among Khmer refugee adolescents. Journal of Multicultural  /     Social Work, 8, 15-46.  / Ellis, B. H., MacDonald, H. Z., Lincoln, A. K., & Cabral, H. J. (2008). Mental health of  /     Somali adolescent refugees: The role of trauma, stress, and perceived discrimination.  /     Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 76, 184-193. / Entholt, K., Smith, P., & Yule, W. (2005). School based Cognitive-behavioral therapy  /     group intervention for refugee children who have experienced war-related trauma.  /     Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 5, 169-188. / Fazel, M., Reed, Panter-Brick, & Stein. (2012). Mental health of displaced refugee children  /     resettled in high-income countries: risk and protective factors. The Lancet, 379, 266-282. / Haene, L. D., Grietens, H., & Verschueren. (2007). From symptom to context: A review of the  /     literature on refugee children’s mental health. Hellenic Journal of Psychology, 4, 233-256.  / Halcon, L., Robertson, C. L., Savik, K., Johnson, D., R., Spring, M. A., Butcher, J. N., et  /     al. (2004). Trauma and coping in Somali and Oromo refugee youth. Journal of  /     Adolescent Health, 35, 17-25.  / Kovacev, L., & Shute, R. (2004). Acculturation and social support in relation to  /     psychosocial adjustment of adolescent refugees resettled in Australia. International  /     Journal of Behavioral Development, 28, 259-267. / Layne et al., (2001). Trauma/grief-focused group psychotherapy: School-based postwar  /      intervention with traumatized Bosnian adolescents. Group Dynamics: Theory,  /     Research, and Practice, 5, 277-290.  / Montgomery, E. (2010). Trauma and resilience in young refugees: A 9-year follow-up study.  /     Development and Psychopathology, 22, 477-489. / Sleijpen, M., June ter Heide, J., Mooren, T., Boeije, H. R., & Kleber, R. J. (2013). Bouncinf  /     forward of young refugees: A perspective on resilience research directions. European Journal  /     of Psychotraumatology, 4, 1-9. / Smith, P., Perrin, S., Yule, W., Hacam, B., & Stuvland, R. (2002). War exposure among  /     children from Bosnia-Herzegovina: Psychological adjustment in a community sample.  /     Journal of Traumatic Stress, 15, 147-156.  / UNHCR (2008). 2007 Global Trends: Refugees, asylum seekers, returnees, internally  /     displaced, and stateless persons. Available at http://www.unhcr.org/statistics  / • Increase mental health practitioners/providers’ awareness of the various aspects of resilience in refugee youth. • Sensitize mental health, school counselors, students, educators, and researchers about the cultural hotspots that may necessitate an emphasis on resilience and not trauma in the well-being of refugee youth. • Provide culturally relevant suggestions for working with diverse refugee youth. Program Summary /  / The Presenter will use an Educational session to discuss the need for a shift in addressing the mental health and well-being of refugee youth in countries of resettlement. The presenter will discuss some of the challenges refugee youth encounter as newcomers in a new cultural environment, including the school environment. In addition, elements of resilience as well as why some refugee youth remain resilient in the face of risk and adversities will be addressed. Further, the presenter will discuss the unique challenges faced by some specific groups of refugee youth due to their ethnic and cultural backgrounds and suggest culturally relevant and/or appropriate strategies for interventions. Researchers, students working as interns with refugee youth as potential clients, and educators who may be in the role of supervisors may benefit from attending this program. Participants will be invited to share any experiences working with refugee youth and also ask questions about the presenter’s experience working with refugees in general and specifically refugee youth.  / Bellah Kiteki Doctorate                           • Refugee youth Resilience Mental health/Well-being
144 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 403 Military culture… Let’s RAP:  Research, Assess, Plan With the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, there are over 2.4 million veterans in our country (Department of Defense, 2012).  Roughly 900,000 veterans and/or veterans’ family members are deciding to return to college and use their GI Bills to further their education (Department of Veterans, 2012); however, the transition to higher education can be very challenging.  While the student veterans may struggle with issues such as disability accommodations and course structure, both veterans and their family members may endure hurdles with enrollment, admissions, using the GI Bills, and the general cultural differences between the military and civilian lifestyles.  Furthermore, counselor educators also may be challenged with how best to serve the needs of this population.  Counselor educators may need to modify one’s cultural pedagogy to meet the needs of the military/veteran population.  The presentation will provide a brief overview of the military culture, discuss relevant research, and provide practical ideas to infuse the cultural understanding of the military/veteran population into one’s own program and/or university.  Finally, the presentation will conclude with an opportunity for colleagues to multi-systemically assess their own programmatic/university needs, as well as begin to develop a plan to promote military cultural awareness within their program and/or university. To understand the military culture and its implications on veterans/ families of  veterans. To analyze the research findings as they relate to challenges faced by both educators and veterans/families of veterans. To assess and plan for integrating practical strategies into one’s own pedagogy, program and/or university. With the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, there are over 2.4 million veterans in our country and over 900,000 veterans/family members choosing to use their GI Bills. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the military culture, relevant research findings, and analyze the needs of this population. Finally, the presentation will conclude with an opportunity for colleagues to multi-systemically assess their own programmatic/university needs, as well as begin to develop a plan to promote military cultural awareness within their program and/or university. Kristin Vincenzes Ph.D. Kellie Forziat BS Emily Raymond BA               Military Culture Application
146 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 406 Employment Experiences of Transgender Individuals: Voices of Support for Career Counseling / Employment considerations are at the forefront of a person experiencing gender identity differences as many issues arise due to employment adjustment such as discrimination, substance abuse, and loss of employment. Many transgender individuals struggle with getting adequate support during gender identity transitions, therefore career counseling may serve as a way for clients to benefit from the practical contribution career services can provide while also offering counseling skills that can be protective against much of the stigma and discrimination faced by the individual.  In order to be culturally competent, it is essential that counselors have a clear understanding of the implications discrimination has on the career development trajectory for a transgender person and how career counseling specifically addresses the career adjustment challenges while also providing mental health support and advocacy.  A qualitative study sought to give voice to the employment experiences of transgender individuals in order to understand how counseling can address many of these issues.   / The findings of this study will be featured as an Educational Session to share and discuss many of the challenges, experiences, and potential counseling methods that can appropriately address the needs of the transgender community. The purpose of this presentation is to explore how counseling services can best provide assistance to an individual struggling with a gender identity difference as well providing counselor educators and supervisors with information about this diverse population. 1.    Qualitative findings of transgender individuals’ experience with employment related issues. 2.     Advanced dialogue regarding best practices for supporting transgender individuals with employment related issues. 3. Exploration of how counselor educators and supervisors can increase their cultural relevance by understanding the needs of the transgender individual. In this session, the presenter will provide specific recommendations and strategies based on qualitative research findings to counselor educators and supervisors in how to support transgender individuals with employment issues. Recommendations include: best practice for providing career counseling services to the transgender population, advantages of using a career- counseling approach, and implications for treatment. The presenter will also share the findings of a qualitative study to understand the employment experiences of a transgender individual. Christina Thomas M.A.                           transgender career employment
147 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 404 The Effect of Jyoti Meditation on Student Counselors' Stress: Exploring the Role of Emotional Intelligence Previous research has found meditation to have numerous benefits to physical and psychological health. However, meditation research has been limited in the range of methods being studied, the secularization of meditation, and a history of poor methodological designs. If counselor educators are to be leaders of culturally relevant pedagogy, they must understand the various types of meditations, their cultural implications, and the research behind their effectiveness before introducing meditation practices to students as potentially effective techniques. The assumption that all meditations are created equal denies the rich cultural heritage of certain practices and limits counselors from employing more culturally relevant approaches with their clients. Additionally, previous research has demonstrated that meditation has beneficial effects for student counselors. Therefore, counselor educators could benefit from including culturally responsive meditation practices in their pedagogy. The presenters have conducted a randomized-controlled trial examining the effect of Jyoti Meditation (JM) on student counselors. JM is a non-denominational spiritually-based meditation practice that has a rich cultural tradition; but has yet to be examined empirically for its psychological benefits. Our goal is to briefly review the relevant literature on meditation in counselor education, provide the findings of our study, discuss the important cultural implications of integrating meditation, and demonstrate with the audience JM. The presentation will be both experiential and lecture-based with an emphasis on facilitating group discussion. / Participants will understand the relevant literature regarding meditation and counselor education. Participants will learn new research findings on the effects of Jyoti Meditation on stress. Participants will learn and participate in a potential self-care strategy Research examining the effects of meditation on student counselors has shown that it increases counselor self-efficacy, reduces distress, and increases cognitive empathy. Therefore, meditation can be included into counselor education to benefit students as a self-care strategy. However, the research on meditation has only focused on a few limited practices. In this presentation, we will share the findings of a recent study that examined the effect of Jyoti Meditation, a new spiritually-based meditation practice, on student counselors’ stress levels. Daniel Gutierrez Ph.D. Abigail Conley Ph.D. Mark Young Ph.D.               Meditation Stress Self-care
148 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 405 Neuroscience-Informed Supervision: Developmental and Practical Applications Understanding and integrating neuroscience research into clinical practice represents a rapidly growing area in Counseling.  Neuroscience informs clinical practice by validating theory, guiding clinical assessment, formulating comprehensive conceptualizations, selecting effective interventions, and facilitating cross-disciplinary communication.  Little attention, however, has been paid to integrating neuroscience into supervisory practice. This presentation addresses this gap and presents the audience with not only the empirical and conceptual rationale for the integration of neuroscience into supervision but also concrete application strategies. /   / Specifically, the presenters will discuss ways to use neuroscience concepts to enhance supervisees’ self-awareness, cultivate safety in the therapeutic relationship, motivate supervisee self-care, foster essential counseling skill attainment, broaden client conceptualizations, and inform interventions. Particular neuroscience foci include, among others, brain development, neural connectivity and integration, the Autonomic Nervous System, physiological arousal and regulation, neuroplasticity, and the implicit memory system. The role culturally-based experiences, such as discrimination and oppression, play in brain development and how these experiences can surface in supervision will also be addressed.  Through role-plays, case presentations, and interactive activities the presenters will demonstrate concrete approaches to using neuroscience to inform and enhance supervision.  Varying levels of prior neuroscience knowledge will be honored so participants can leave with terminology and ideas relevant to their developmental levels. / Discuss rationale for incorporating neuroscience concepts into supervision. Identify neuroscience principles relevant to the supervision process. Demonstrate concrete application practices. This session extends conversations regarding neuroscience and counseling to the supervision experience.  Presenters will identify and discuss ways in which neuroscience principles can be used to enhance supervisees’ self-awareness, foster essential counseling skills, broaden client conceptualizations, and provide rationale for interventions.  Participants will have the opportunity to move beyond basic knowledge through participating in live role-plays and engaging in interactive exercises.       / Raissa Miller Ph.D. Laura Jones Ph.D                     Neuroscience Supervision  
149 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 310 At the Intersection of Female and Everything Else: Perspectives for Counselor Educators The holistic nature of intersectionality centers on identifying, deconstructing and honoring an individuals’ numerous integral social identities, and the unique interaction amongst those identities (Shields, 2008). Intersectionality, as a systemic - multifaceted approach, utilizes a social justice framework to understand social inequalities not in isolation but within its multiple intersections (Seedall, Holtrop, & Parra-Cardona, 2014). /  / The concept of intersectionality remains salient for women globally as they are often faced with the task of negotiating multiple and frequently contradictory identity constructs. Women, in the global landscape, share numerous common challenges in relation to gender, development, career, social interface and self-actualization (Bose, 2012). As counselors, negotiating multiple identities inherently affects our work. Understanding how identities intersect and interact can impact our personal and professional development, as well as our understanding of others.  /  / The presenters, three women who hail from different backgrounds, will demonstrate through their own developmental journey, the concept of intersectionality and its relevance. Their rich identities will serve as an exemplar of the global landscape for women, and will provide a foundation for discussing professional leadership and cultural relevant practices in the counseling profession. During this interactive presentation, the audience will be engaged in reflection and interaction throughout open discussion, real life scenarios, and reflective activities. All interested in the female identity and its interaction with various social {schema} are invited to attend. Explore the definition of intersectionality and its role in the personal and professional development of counselors, clients, and students. Discuss the implications of intersectionality, in regards to working with clients and students. Participate in the process of deconstruction of the presenters’ identities as a case study. The holistic nature of intersectionality centers on identifying, deconstructing and honoring an individuals’ numerous integral social identities and, uniquely, the interaction amongst those identities.  / The presenters, three women who hail from different backgrounds, will use examples of their own lives to discuss and explore the concept of intersectionality and its relevance to the counseling profession. Their rich identities will serve as an exemplar of the global landscape for women. Syntia D. Santos Ph.D. Anjabeen Ashraf Master Jill M. Krahwinkel Ph.D.               Intersectionality Identity Multiculturalism
151 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 409 Questioning Intuition Through Reflective Engagement Counselors functioning at higher levels of cognitive complexity (moral, ego, and intellectual development) are more effective at their practice (Goodman & West-Olatunji, 2009a, 2009b; Granello, 2010). Cognitive complexity is developed through some specific classroom interventions, intrapersonal reflective engagement, as well as experience in a classroom culture that is intellectually safe and promotes opportunities for meaningful dialogic interactions between students and professors (Briggs & Pehrsson, 2008; Magnuson et al, 2003; Schrader, 2004; Sexton, 2000).  For these reasons, enhancing reflective pedagogy continues to be a goal of counselor educators (Davidson & Schmidt, 2014; Schmidt & Adkins, 2012). / The cognitive processes involved in moral decision-making and therefore moral development are certainly complex. One of these complexities that has been a popular topic of debate over the past decade involves the relevance and influence of two critical elements: reasoning and intuition. Research findings from neuropsychology concerning intuition’s influence on moral decision-making have generated renewed energy in this debate.  Discussion continues in the literature about the relationship between intuition and reasoning and whether or not one should be considered more dominant than the other, or whether they can be viewed as equally influential on one’s moral decision-making.  / In order to understand what types of reflective activities are most effective for enhancing student moral development and cognitive complexity, we must first have a better understanding of the role of intuition on students’ decision making processes. Therefore, this grounded theory study sought to gain an in-depth understanding of whether or not a sample of students were aware of intuition’s impact on their moral calculations without being prompted to explicitly address it. To the extent that they were aware of intuition and its impact, how did they understand intuition’s influence? Understand the importance of reflective practice and cognitive complexity. Understand the impact of intuition on moral/ ethical decision making and therefore cognitive development. Understand "Process of Questioning Intuition" as outlined in the research study so that counselor educators can integrate some of these findings into their current reflective pedagogy. Current literature on ethics and moral development focuses on discussion concerning the impact of intuition on moral decision-making. Through the use of student journal reflections over the course of one semester, this study utilized a grounded theory approach in order to explore and understand participant levels of awareness and understanding of intuition in this regard. The findings suggest that reflective engagement enables these participants to become more aware of and therefore access and govern intuitions so that they can be more equally integrated during a moral decision-making process. This study emphasizes the student’s understanding of the impact of intuition on moral decision-making and therefore offers additional insight into the current discussion in the literature. Chris Schmidt PhD                           intuition reflection grounded theory
150 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 305 Working Through the Tiers: Expanding Your Students’ Knowledge of PBIS, RTI and the ASCA National Model Without Expanding Your Curriculum. Positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) and response to intervention (RTI) are multi-tiered intervention models implemented in schools across the United States (Bradshaw, Koth, Bevans, Ialongo, & Leaf, 2008). Their focus on prevention and proactive strategies aligns the models with the American School Counseling Association’s national model (Marteens & Anderson, 2013). This presentation will use discussion, course syllabi examples, and real-time polling technology to illustrate how counselor educators can incorporate PBIS and RTI pedagogy into their already existing curriculum. By incorporating PBIS and RTI into their school counseling programs, counselor educators can better prepare school counseling graduate students to address the unique needs of their students using tiered-interventions, including school-wide systems of reinforcement (Eber, Hyde, & Suter 2010), small group approaches that target the needs of students at the secondary tier of intervention (Sherrod, Getch, & Ziomek-Daigle, 2009) and through more individualized approaches targeting the needs of students at the tertiary tier of intervention, such as wraparound services (Eber, Hyde, & Suter, 2011). After attending this presentation, participants will also be able to distinguish and discuss the differences between evidence-based practices, strategies and interventions and embed evidence-based PBIS and RTI content within their current school counseling curriculum. Discuss the differences between evidence-based practices, strategies and interventions Identify ways to embed evidence-based PBIS and RTI content within their current school counseling curriculum Discuss the PBIS, RTI and ASCA models as multi-tiered intervention approaches School counselors are often integral members of their school's Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) and Response to Intervention (RTI) teams. Through discussion, reviewing examples of course syllabi, and engaging participants through real-time polling technology, the presenters will illustrate how counselor educators can incorporate PBIS and RTI pedagogy into their already existing curriculum to better prepare their graduate school counseling students to serve in this capacity. Jason Cavin MS Jolie Daigle Ph.D.                     Curriculum PBIS RTI ASCA National Model
152 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 402 Cultural Concepts in DSM-5 In an effort to improve diagnosis and care to people of all backgrounds, the DSM-5 Task Force worked to incorporate greater cultural sensitivity throughout the manual. Rather than a simple list of culture-bound syndromes, DSM-5 updated criteria to reflect cross-cultural variations in presentations and provide more information about cultural concepts of distress. /  / Because different cultures and communities exhibit or explain symptoms in different ways, counselors need to be aware of relevant contextual information from clients’ culture, race, ethnicity, religion or geographical origin.  For example, uncontrollable crying and headaches are symptoms of panic attacks in some cultures, while difficulty breathing may be the primary symptom in other cultures. Understanding such distinctions will help counselors make more accurate diagnoses and provide more effective treatment. /  / The program goals of this presentation are to (a) introduce counselors to the updated diagnostic criteria that address cultural variation, (b) discuss the various distinctions of symptom presentations among diverse groups, and (c) present the new cultural formulation interview guide that assists counselors in assessing cultural factors influencing clients’ perspectives of their symptoms. This presentation will use a combination of lecture and case studies/examples to impart information. This presentation strongly relates to the conference theme with its focus on culturally relevant practice. / Participants will learn about the updated DSM-5 diagnostic criteria that address cultural variation. Participants will gain understanding about the various distinctions of symptom presentations among diverse groups. Participants will be able to apply this information and cultural formulation to the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of clients in various mental health settings. To improve diagnosis and care to people of all backgrounds, the DSM-5 has incorporated greater cultural sensitivity throughout the manual by reflecting cross-cultural variations in diagnostic criteria.  This presentation will introduce the updated DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, discuss various symptom presentations among diverse groups, and present a new cultural formulation interview guide that assists counselors in assessing cultural factors influencing clients’ symptoms presentations. Dayle Jones Ph.D.                           DSM-5 Culture  
164 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Race and Diagnostic Disparities: Enhancing Culturally Sensitive Pedagogy in Counselor Education and Supervision Racial disparities in the diagnosis of mental disorders are well documented but poorly understood. A widespread pattern of more severe and stigmatizing diagnoses (e.g., psychotic and disruptive behavior disorders) exists among clients of color. Potential consequences include more invasive treatments, loss of autonomy (e.g., inpatient admissions), social and self-stigma, and lost occupational opportunities. For multicultural competency and ethical compliance purposes it is vital that counselor educators are informed about updated and counseling-specific methods of limiting racial diagnostic disparities. The authors have published the most recent qualitative meta-analysis on this topic. Moreover, the authors have published the only counseling-specific research on race and diagnosis to date. This roundtable session will outline literature about this phenomenon, highlighting national and counseling-specific trends and their consequences for counselor educators. Models of underlying causes for the phenomenon will be summarized. The goal of this roundtable session is to collaborate on best practice pedagogical and supervision strategies focused on improving diagnostic objectivity and limiting racial disparities. Culture-specific diagnostic bias and advocacy practices will be highlighted through discussions and facilitated question/answer periods. With greater understanding of this phenomenon and the generation of collaborative pedagogical strategies, counselor educators will enhance their culturally relevant leadership abilities. These leadership abilities will be translated into effective culturally sensitive counselor preparation (i.e., diagnosis, multicultural, and clinical courses). /  / [1,495 characters] Participants will gain an in-depth understanding of racial diagnostic disparities in counselor education and supervision Participants will collaborate on best practice pedagogical and supervision strategies geared toward improving diagnostic objectivity and limiting racial disparities Participants will enhance their culturally relevant leadership abilities related to culturally sensitive counselor preparation Racial disparities in the diagnosis of mental disorders are well documented but poorly understood. Using the most recent qualitative meta-analysis and the only counseling-specific research on race and diagnosis to date, counseling-specific trends and their consequences will be highlighted. Through facilitated discussions participants will collaborate on best practice pedagogical strategies focused on improving diagnostic objectivity and limiting racial disparities. Related leadership abilities will be translated into culturally sensitive counselor preparation. /  / [495 characters] David Blankenship M.S. Bill Owenby M.C. Sarah Noble M.S.Ed. Robert Schwartz Ph.D.         Race Diagnosis Pedagogy
165 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Identifying the Mentoring Needs of Counseling Students and Junior Faculty Counselor educators and counseling students benefit from mentoring relationships as they foster the development of communication, relationships, and professional development (Taylor & Neimeyer, 2009; Vespia, 2006). Although the potential benefits of mentoring are clear and mentorship is a widely accepted part of counselor education programs, little attention has been given to determining what mentees need, particularly at varying developmental levels of those in counselor education programs.  /  / In this roundtable discussion, the presenters will discuss the development and preliminary validation of a measure for assessing the specific needs of mentees (both students and junior faculty) in counselor education programs. The purpose of this research, funded by a grant from the Southern Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (SACES), was to produce an instrument that counselor education faculty can use to identify the unique needs of mentees. The presenters will discuss the measure’s subscales of mentoring needs resulting from an exploratory factor analysis and the needs expressed by the three sample groups (i.e., master level students, doctoral level students, and pretenured faculty). The culture of these three groups is diverse, and the ability to identify and to meet the unique needs of mentees contributes to the development of a new generation of counselors and counselor educators who have tools for success and a strong identity in their professional roles. / 1. Participants will develop awareness of the steps involved in creating an instrument. 2. Participants will learn how to use a tool for identifying the needs of their mentees. 3. Participants will develop awareness of potential differences in mentoring needs based on developmental stage (i.e., master’s level students, doctoral students, pretenured faculty). Effective mentoring attends to the specific and developmental needs of mentees. In this session, presenters will discuss their development of an original mentoring needs instrument. The presenters will discuss the subscales of mentoring needs resulting from an exploratory factor analysis and the needs identified by the three sample groups (i.e., master level students, doctoral level students, and pretenured faculty). This research was funded by a grant from SACES. Marcella Stark Ph.D. Jennifer Boswell Ph.D. Angie Wilson Ph.D.               needs mentoring relationships  
166 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B CACREP Accreditation: A Collaborative Discussion on Increasing Students’ Awareness Prior to Graduate School Enrollment Recently, the implications of counseling programs’ CACREP-accreditation status on students’ post-graduation opportunities have increased.  A growing number of states place heavier emphasis on the applicant’s receipt of a counseling degree from a CACREP-accredited program (CACREP, 2013). Further, graduation from a CACREP-accredited program is required for counselors seeking employment consideration in the Department of Veteran Affairs and for TRICARE reimbursement (TRICARE, 2014). Beginning in 2022, graduation from a CACREP-accredited program will be prerequisite for NCC certification (NBCC, 2014) / Prospective students unfamiliar with CACREP may not sufficiently consider accreditation as a relevant criterion when selecting a graduate-level program. Considering that nearly half of graduate-level counseling students reported being unaware of CACREP accreditation pre-enrollment (Honderich & Lloyd-Hazlett, in press), the need arises for collegiate discourse about increasing student’s knowledge of CACREP.  Such dialogue assists students in making informed higher education decisions aligned with their long-term career objectives. The goal of this roundtable presentation is to encourage discussion on: students’ pre-enrollment awareness and ascribed importance of CACREP accreditation (Honderich & Lloyd-Hazlett, in press), programmatic and field specific strategies for increasing awareness, and contextual considerations, including cultural, framing this topic. Participants will discuss students’ lack of CACREP awareness pre-enrollment and implications suggested by the literature consequent to increasing this knowledge Participants will examine program and field specific strategies for increasing prospective students’ awareness of CACREP Participants will review contextual, including cultural, considerations of outreach to potential students Though opportunities for CACREP graduates are increasing, nearly half of students reported being unaware of CACREP prior to enrolling in a graduate counseling program (Honderich & Lloyd-Hazlett, in press).  Prospective students may not sufficiently consider accreditation when making enrollment decisions. This roundtable will facilitate discussion about strategies for increasing students’ pre-enrollment awareness of CACREP, as well interrelated cultural and broader implications of this action. Eleni Honderich PhD Jessica Lloyd-Haxlett PhD                     CACREP Accreditation Graduate Students Enrollment Decisions
157 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A Teaching the Teacher: An Analysis of Teaching Preparation in Counselor Education Doctoral Programs RATIONALE: Teaching is a core role of counselor educators, and proposed 2016 CACREP Standards require that doctoral programs include attention to pedagogy; adult development and learning; curriculum design, delivery, and evaluation; online instruction; learning assessment; and ethical and cultural considerations.  Despite a sizeable body of literature regarding teaching in counselor education, a 10-year content analysis of counselor education revealed minimal attention to doctoral preparation and only one journal article focused on teaching preparation for doctoral students (Barrio Minton, Wachter Morris, & Yaites, 2014).   /  /  GOALS:  /  / Participants will understand CACREP standards regarding teaching preparation, know current practices in teaching preparation, identify strengths and gaps in current practices, and generate implications. /  / METHOD: Presenters will discuss findings from original research regarding teaching preparation in CACREP-accredited doctoral programs.  Study findings will include attention to multiple layers of preparation including content analysis of required and elective coursework as well as clinical/internship activities related to teaching. Following brief synopsis of results, facilitators will guide participants in exploring implications for strong, grounded preparation of counselor educators. /  / THEME: Presenters will address diverse pedagogies within counselor education and include attention to teaching preparation as it relates social and cultural diversity. (1) Understand CACREP standards related to teacher preparation in counselor education programs (2) Know methods by which programs prepare counselor educators for teaching roles (3) Identify strengths, gaps, and implications related to current teaching preparation practices Teaching is a core role of counselor educators, and proposed 2016 CACREP Standards require enhanced attention to pedagogy.  Presenters will review relevant CACREP standards and discuss original research regarding teaching preparation in doctoral programs.  Following a brief synopsis of course syllabi and experiential requirements, facilitators will guide participants in exploring ideas, opportunities, resources, and implications for counselor educator preparation. Casey Barrio Minton PhD Eric Price MA                     Counselor Education Teaching Preparation
158 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A The Aftermath: Faculty Voices and Recommendations Following a CACREP Site Visit Counseling program faculty who are considering CACREP-accreditation are able to locate support and resources that assist  in their preparation of the self-study, site visit, and (if applicable) their institutional response following a site visit directly on the CACREP website (CACREP, 2014). However, limited literature exists that articulates specifically counseling faculty experiences following an accreditation visit. What conversations take place between administration, programs, and their faculty following a CACREP site visit that has the potential to enhance counseling program development? As faculty in leadership roles who recently underwent re-accreditation, it is critical to overall program health and future vitality to discuss the implications of the “aftermath” experiences following a CACREP-accreditation visit. In addition, due to the focus on measurable outcomes and accountability in higher education (Jossey-Bass, 2011) there remains a considerable need to re-evaluate what constitutes counseling program quality and effectiveness. The presenters plan to facilitate discussion surrounding their “aftermath” experiences and co-construct implementation ideas for overall program improvement. /  / The presenters will share their experiences following a CACREP-accreditation visit and engage in dialogue that facilitates envisioning and co-construct implementation ideas for overall program improvement. The primary goals of this presentation include the following:  1. To increase participants knowledge surrounding the “aftermath” experiences of faculty who underwent a CACREP re-accreditation visit, 2. To provide opportunities for participants to share their experiences with the CACREP process. 3. To co-construct implementation ideas for overall program improvement, and 4. Challenge an often reactionary perspective to accreditation and consider proactive alternatives that reinforce overall counseling program development and modeling for other counseling programs.  /  / This presentation will incorporate thought provoking experiential activities to stimulate discussion and an opportunity to co-construct innovative approaches to program development.  /  / To be culturally relevant in pedagogy and practice, educators must first become aware of how their experiences impact their actions. The culture of education is changing with the speed of new technological advances that facilitate opportunities to bring many cultures and world views right at our fingertips. With these changes it is imperative that counselor educators consider a lens that embraces multiple ways of interacting with students, the university culture, and the community. Sharing our experiences following a CACREP re-accreditation visit, listening to others’ experiences, and facilitating dialogue that encourages co-construction for program improvement, will provide a space for culturally relevant pedagogy and practice to evolve. / To increase participants knowledge surrounding the “aftermath” experiences of faculty who underwent a CACREP re-accreditation visit. To co-construct implementation ideas for overall program improvement. Challenge an often reactionary perspective to accreditation and consider proactive alternatives that reinforce overall counseling program development and modeling for other counseling programs. Due to limited literature existing that articulates specifically counseling faculty experiences following an accreditation visit; the presenters are interested in learning about other programs and their experiences following a visit. What conversations take place between administration, programs, and their faculty following a CACREP site visit that has the potential to enhance counseling program development? It is critical to overall program health and future vitality to discuss the implications of the “aftermath” experiences following a CACREP-accreditation visit. The presenters plan to facilitate discussion surrounding their “aftermath” experiences and co-construct implementation ideas for overall program improvement.  /  / Melissa Odegard-Koester Doctor of Philosophy Rebecca Koltz Doctor of Philosophy                     Program Improvement CACREP-accreditation Advocacy
167 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B We can support you: Minority counselor educators, mentoring and career development Minority counselor educator attrition is compounded by a lack of mentorship of African-Americans and female counselor educators. A priority of ACES has been the mentor/mentee partnership and the characteristics of mentors and mentees. This roundtable discussion seeks to explore the mentoring relationship, career development, and culturally alert mentoring concerning minority faculty members. We will  examine the structure of the mentor/mentee relationship,  navigating cross-cultural mentoring relationships, and best practices within the mentor/mentee relationship that promote minority career development through networking, publication opportunities, and conference attendance.  /  This 50 minute roundtable discussion will allow the presenters and participants to share information and perspectives regarding each area concerning the support minority counselor educators receive through mentoring, career development, and being culturally alert. The end result of the discussion could be programs which promote informal and formal mentoring. Minority counselor educators can use this discussion to begin the process of constructing mentoring agendas in the role of mentor and mentee.  / The theme, Leadership for Culturally Relevant Pedagogy, is consistent with the topic of this roundtable discussion as mentorship involves leadership and the culturally relevant aspect of theme is addressed by exploring culturally alert mentorship and mentoring best practices.  / Identify factors that influence career development in minority counselor educators. Identify barriers to career development for minority counselor educators. Identify positive programs and strategies in practice to support counselor educators. This roundtable discussion will explore the mentoring relationship, career development, and culturally alert mentoring of minority counselor educator faculty members. We will  examine the structure of the mentor/mentee relationship,  navigating cross-cultural mentoring relationships as a facet of culturally alert mentoring and best practices within mentor/mentee relationship that promote minority career development through networking, publication opportunities, and conference attendance. Miranda Parries PhD Matthew Bonner PhD Hsin-Ya Tang PhD David Ford PhD Tracy L. Jackson PhD, NCC, NCSC, ACS   Minority counselor educators Mentoriing Career development
168 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Supporting Leadership Competency in Master's Level CITs through Peer-Based Intervention The promotion of leadership and advocacy is vital to the continued advancement of our profession (Chang, et al., 2012). However, much of the literature on building leadership competency in counselor education programs focuses on doctoral students (Cox, 2003). It is essential for counseling programs to foster leadership development in master’s CITs (Meany-Walen, et al, 2013). Significant roles in leadership development for CITs include mentoring (Chang et al., 2012), active involvement in organizations such as Chi Sigma Iota (Wahesh, Myers, 2014; Luke, Goodrich, 2010) and social justice advocacy (Storlie, Wood, 2014). Although faculty certainly influence leadership development, a peer-based model may be most effective in increasing CIT awareness of leadership opportunities, exploration of leadership ability, assumption of leadership roles, forming of collaborative leadership teams, and motivating others to develop their own leadership identity (Komives et al., 2006). Within a peer-based model, faculty mentorship and support remain important components for facilitating student success. / The purpose of this presentation is to examine peer-based strategies for leadership development in master’s CITs. We will accomplish this goal through the facilitation of a directed roundtable with focused discussion questions. This presentation aligns with the conference theme through the promotion of effective leadership practices for CITs, who can serve as ambassadors for social equality. / Participants will learn about models of leadership development, with special focus given to their applicability to master’s CITs. Participants will learn strategies for infusing leadership competency into master’s level courses. Participants will learn strategies for using a peer-based model to help promote leadership competency in master’s CITs. This presentation seeks to explore ways in which master’s level counseling programs can help promote the continued growth and development of the counseling profession through the facilitation of leadership competency among master’s level counselors-in-training (CITs). We will discuss faculty-led initiatives, but will focus primarily on peer-based interventions that help to create an expectation of student leadership and encourage CIT participation in leadership tasks/roles. Juliana Carter BA Julia Whisenhunt Doctorate                     Leadership Advocacy Counselor Education
169 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Objective Tools for Solid Gatekeeping Gatekeeping is a central role to counselor educators and one that is essential for the continuation of the profession as a means of promoting of ethical practice.  There are several important elements to be considered when discussing gatekeeping, including cultural considerations, levels of gatekeeping, program policy, objective measures, student characteristics, etc…   Counselor educators are not the only individuals aware of the need to gate-keep; students also report the necessity of the practice and vital components to consider in the process (Foster, Leppma, & Hutchinson, 2014).  As a result of increased interest and understanding of the role of gatekeeper played by counselor educators, emerging theory of gatekeeping practices have been published (Ziomek-Daigle & Christensen, 2010).  Additionally, specific practices within the scope of gatekeeping have been researched and published (Foster & McAdams, 2009).  Due to the heightened litigiousness of our society, it is imperative that counselor educators document well and have objective measures before following through with the strictest of the gatekeeping role: dismissal from a program.  Gatekeeping is a process that occurs throughout the program and begins with recruitment and admission.  The necessity of having an organized and objective measure of student disposition and academic issues present at admissions cannot be overstated (Swank & Smith-Adcock, 2014).  Admission is the first true gate that counselors-in-training must pass through on their journey to becoming professional counselors.  A variety of methods used by counselor educators during the admissions process to screen prospective applicants have been evaluated (Bradey & Post, 1991; Perusse, Goodnough, & Noel, 2001; Ziomek-Daigle & Christensen, 2010).  However, the majority of these measures are academic in nature, with dispositional criteria being mostly subjective.  Identifying well thought-out, objective tools to use in the process of gatekeeping during admissions, as well as throughout the program needs to be explored.   / The goals of this roundtable session will be to facilitate discussion into how different counselor education programs around the country are taking on the task of gatekeeping and providing participants with objective tools used in the process of gatekeeping at varying times in the program.  As all counselor educators share in this role and process, it is helpful to have regular discussions around best-practices related to the field of gatekeeping.  There are several different avenues to explore when finalizing a programmatic plan for gatekeeping students with both academic concerns, as well as nonacademic concerns. This plan is one that needs to be informed by research in the field.   Informing each other of tools used and conceptualizations of the gatekeeping process put into practice will provide participants with increased understanding of ways their departments may make changes to ensure CACREP procedures are being followed.  The facilitator of this discussion has created a plan for gatekeeping flowing from the admissions process through the final semester of internship that has objective, documented measures.  The facilitator will be sharing this plan and encouraging others to share what they are doing within their own departments.   The development of rubrics related to measuring disposition concerns throughout the program will be shared and discussion on how to implement such assessment tools will be considered.  / The delivery method of this presentation will be discussion based.  Handouts of the facilitator’s gatekeeping plan, developed rubrics, and documentation forms will be distributed for discussion.  This session will be a roundtable discussion where the participants can brainstorm ways to ensure their programs and departments are following through with the best gatekeeping practices in our profession today.   / The theme of this year’s conference is timely and essential to this specific roundtable discussion.  While we often discuss gatekeeping in the field of counselor education, we struggle to facilitate this discussion while incorporating multicultural competencies.  Research into gatekeeping with culturally responsive practices at times such as admissions, retention, and remediation has been sparse (Ziomek-Daigle & Bailey, 2009).  The dearth of research in this area is one that must be addressed and discussed.  This roundtable discussion will incorporate themes of multicultural considerations during key times and types of gatekeeping, with the facilitator sharing specific and personal challenges, as well as way of overcoming these challenges.     / Provide counselor educators with specific tools used in the gatekeeping process at all levels Facilitate discussion of best-practices and theories in the area of gatekeeping Inform participants of multicultural considerations at all levels of gatekeeping in the profession Gatekeeping is a central role to all counselor educators.  It is imperative that as a profession we provide adequate means, tools, and theories for the process of gatekeeping to occur in a fair and competent manner.  The process of gatekeeping begins at recruitment and continues through the last semester of internship.  Each counselor education department in the nation needs to be prepared to answer questions about, and implement, a plan for gatekeeping at all programmatic levels.  CACREP has been very clear that the process of gatekeeping those students who do not meet academic or disposition criteria must be gate-kept through a well thought-out and just plan.  It is crucial that all departments are informed on current research being done in the area of gatekeeping and knowledgeable on ways to increase the likelihood of successful gatekeeping from retention through dismissal.   This roundtable session will provide discussion into how one counselor education program has structured and implemented their gatekeeping plan.  Objective assessment tools used for both academic and disposition concerns will be presented and means of proper documentation will be discussed.  Participants are encouraged to come prepared to discuss how they have structured the gatekeeping process at their institutions and share triumphs and challenges based upon experience. Melanie Person PhD                           Gatekeeping Remediation Dispositions
155 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A Flower Collage: An Experiential Activity on Collective Trauma Counselor education programs are required to include trauma in their curriculum, but the focus often has been on individual trauma.  The goals of this session are to provide a training tool that can be used with students and supervisees to sensitize them to the issues of collective trauma. Members of marginalized groups, including minorities, refugees, and immigrants, bring to counseling not only their personal traumas, but also their collective traumas.  Entire communities experience events that threaten the fabric of their existence. Recent examples are the civil wars in the Middle East and rise of radicalized Islam; the recent killings of Black males by the police; the devastating floods in the Philippines, etc. Trauma brought about by armed conflict is different than trauma brought about by flood. The roundtable will involve participating in a structured learning activity that invites participants to experience and explore important facets of collective trauma, broadening their understanding of transgenerational, accumulated, multiple, and shared traumas.  Handouts will be provided that include detailed instructions for facilitating this exercise, definitions of important terms, references, and helpful resources to equip counselors with essential tools for intervening and advocating for survivors of collective trauma. Describe collective trauma and its impact on clients and communities. Implement an experiential activity to sensitize students and supervisees to the concept and consequences of collective trauma. Become more committed to the role of advocate for those who endure collective trauma. The collective traumas of marginalized groups have been ignored in the counseling profession. This roundtable will involve participants in an experiential activity to promote awareness, at a visceral level, of students and supervisees to the deep impact of collective trauma. Handouts will be provided that include instructions for facilitating this exercise, definitions of important terms, references, and helpful resources to equip counselors with essential tools for intervening and advocating for survivors of collective trauma. Daria White Master's                           Trauma community  
161 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A "You Don't Look Like a Lesbian:" Challenging Heteronormativity in Counselor Education Academic settings frequently house and perpetuate stigmas that have marginalizing effects for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex, and allied (LGBTQQIA) students and educators. Sadly, counselor education is not immune to issues of heterosexism and heteronormativity (Frank & Cannon, 2010). Individuals that do not meet conventional pairings of gender expression and sexual orientation (e.g., feminine/lesbian, masculine/gay) are often met with skepticism regarding the legitimacy of their experiences with heterosexism and discrimination. As the professional identity of counselors and counselor educators mandates the personal and professional advocacy of traditionally silenced voices, the equality of all members in the LGBTQQIA community is necessarily within the scope of the counseling academic agenda. Drawing from feminist and queer theory, the presenters will provide insight into the complex social location of LGBTQQIA individuals in counselor education. The presenters will also integrate autoethnographic narratives to produce a contextual examination that specifically elucidates the experiences of "femme," "queer," "counselor," and "counselor educator.” By integrating social justice theory and lived experience, the presenters will outline a praxis of queer inclusivity and introduce guidelines for enacting LGBTQ affirming academic spaces for faculty, students, and staff. increase understanding of queer theory be able to deconstruct various types of marginalizations, e.g., heterosexism, sexism increase guidelines for affirmative and inclusive academic practices Although national ethical codes and accreditation standards specify LGBTQ competence and advocacy as core values of the counseling identity, LGBT and queer-identified counseling students, faculty, and staff may still experience heterosexism and heteronormativity in academic spaces. In this session, the presenters will introduce queer theory as a framework to address and counteract microaggressions in classrooms and supervision settings. The presenters will also discuss guidelines for enacting inclusive, affirmative academic spaces. Megan Speciale MS Stacy Speedlin MA Jennifer Gess MA               LGBTQ Queer theory Multicultural pedagogy
153 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A Investigating Congruence in Personal Growth Groups: The Experiences of Master’s Level Students of Color Scholars have urged that group work include a focus on social justice and multicultural competencies based on the role of privilege within group work (Smith and Shin, 2013) and that there be more open space for students of Color in the classroom, where the training largely reflects a White European bias (McDowell, 2004). There has been little research that focuses specifically on the experiences of students of Color in counselor training programs. Further, what has been written has mostly focused on experiences within the multicultural counseling course. Counselors and students of Color have identified experiencing adversity within counselor training programs (Constantine, 1999; McDowell, 2004). The purpose of the session is to share the lived experiences of the participants in order to guide a more informed and culturally competent group work practice. This presentation will entail a didactic portion using a handout that outlines a review of the literature and the results of a focus group of master’s level counseling students of Color who participated in personal growth groups. The three main themes that emerged from the study include: (a) congruence facilitating experiences, (b) congruence inhibiting experiences, and (c) personal/professional influences. Collaborative dialogue will be facilitated through out the presentation. This topic is in line with the conference theme by encouraging a culturally relevant pedagogy for group work in counselor training programs. Increase knowledge of current literature on some of the barriers that students of Color may face in counselor training programs Increase awareness and knowledge of the experiences with congruence found in a recent focus group of master’s level students of Color Encourage culturally competent group work and propose recommendations for training programs through open dialogue The experiences of master’s level students of Color have received sparse attention within counseling literature, especially outside of the multicultural course. This session will encourage cultural competence in group work in counseling training programs. Findings from a focus group of students of Color about their experiences in personal growth groups include: (a) congruence facilitating experiences, (b) congruence inhibiting experiences, and (c) personal and professional influences. Melanie Varney MAE.,EdS Jacqueline Swank PhD                     students of Color personal growth groups congruence
170 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Transforming Your Classroom: Encouraging Student Involvement and Promoting Active Participation in Assessment Master’s students tend to enter counseling programs at a level of pre-reflective thinking. The presenters devised a model of teaching that enables students to transform their learning ability from black and white thinkers to reflective learners in the classroom. In this presentation, the presenters will focus on empowering students’ in the assessment of their learning through collaboratively developed rubrics created by the faculty and the students. Rubrics typically are used to evaluate student learning. However, rubrics can also limit students’ creativity and ability to excel beyond the standards outlined by the instructor. The presenters, therefore, will inform the audience of the development of their pedagogy that lends itself to minimize the “in the box” thinking that is rampant among today’s students. In this approach, the instructor utilizes an agreed upon rubric by both students and the instructor. Both parties grade the students’ class performance on the designated topic. The discussion format encourages:  (1) the student to grow in their learning, and (2) to gain valuable insight into their own perceptions of self-performance. The presentation is designed to encourage questions, concerns, and discussion in order to utilize this time as a growing experience for both the presenters and participants. Provide an overview of the concepts such as reflective thinking, millennials, and collaborative teaching, highlighting the role of Counselor Educators Engage in a dialogue of assessment development and student responsibility Discuss potential ideas for inclusion of this model is various courses, including challenges and benefits Master’s students tend to enter counseling programs at a level of pre-reflective thinking. The presenters devised a model of teaching that enables students to transform their learning ability from black and white thinkers to reflective learners in the classroom. The presentation is designed to encourage questions, concerns, and discussion in order to utilize this time as a growing experience for both the presenters and participants. Dalena Dillman Taylor PhD Katherine Purswell PhD Ashley Blount M.S.               pedagogy reflective thinking assessment of learning
156 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A Broaching Racial Differences in Student-Faculty Relationships: Strategies for White Faculty and Doctoral Students of Color Broaching is a term that describes the process of bringing up a topic that may be sensitive or difficult.  In this context, it refers to a faculty member bringing up racial differences in the student-faculty relationship.  This idea is anchored in research on broaching in the counseling relationship (Day-Vines et al., 2007). Broaching racial differences can help white faculty members establish effective working relationships with students of color by inviting them to explore how cultural factors may be impacting their academic experiences.   / In this program, the presenters will describe styles of broaching and strategies for success.  Verbatim case examples will be shared and common challenges addressed.  For example, a common challenge for faculty is discomfort with their initial statement about racial differences.  Here is an example of a possible way to broach racial differences, “We just finished your plan of study and as I look it over I notice that of the faculty who currently teach these courses, almost all of them are white. I expect that is very different from your previous experience at Howard University (a historically black university).  On top of that, the norms in graduate school are so different from undergrad.  If you ever having questions or concerns about how things are going please know that I would be happy to talk with you.” / Our presentation is highly relevant to the 2015 ACES conference theme, “Leadership for Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Practice” as it aims to increase cultural competence of current and future counselor educators.   This presentation will be warm and welcoming so anyone who is open, respectfully inquisitive, and committed to supporting students of color can broach race effectively. / Attendees will be able to describe the concept of broaching as it applies to cultural identities of faculty and doctoral students. Attendees will explore common challenges that faculty and doctoral students face as they consider broaching racial differences. Attendees will consider some examples of effective strategies for broaching racial differences in student-faculty relationships. Broaching is a term that describes the process of bringing up a topic that may be sensitive or difficult. In this presentation, we will apply the work of Day-Vines, et al (2007) on broaching cultural differences in the counseling relationship to the student faculty relationship. Broaching racial differences can help white faculty members establish effective working relationships with students of color by inviting them to explore how cultural factors may be impacting their academic experiences. Case examples will be shared and challenges addressed in a warm and welcoming way. Laura Welfare PhD Connie Jones MSW Shekila Melchior MA               Broaching Student-Faculty Relationships Culture
154 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A Supervision Practices that Support Cultural Competence and Multicultural Awareness: An Integrative Approach Rationale: / Developmental models of supervision provide a framework for focusing on cognitive complexity as an important outcome in the training of supervisees.  A general consensus in the research on supervision describes it as a developmental process for moving trainees toward higher levels of cognitive functioning.  Borders (2001) notes in her review of the supervision literature that an emphasis on supervisees’ cognitions is the underlying and often primary focus of supervisory work.  The practice literature has emphasized the importance of providing both a challenging and supportive learning environment for supervisees that encourages their own process of self reflection and conceptual integration.   /  / Borders, L.D. (2001).  Counseling supervision:  A deliberate educational process. In D.C. /            Locke, J.E. Myers, & E.L. Herr (Eds.), The handbook of counseling (pp. 417-432).  /            Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. /  /     / Program Goals: / This presentation outlines three developmental practices that support supervisees in increasing cultural awareness and competence.  A distinction is made in addressing inner and outer cultures as they relate to multicultural identity development. While inner cultures represent the individual’s assumptions and worldview, these constructions may include embedded beliefs and social constructions that overlook power differentials in gender, race, ethnicity, ability, age or social economic status. Three skills are identified that can assist trainees in raising awareness of cultural encapsulations that can block authentic connection and engagement with others.  Skills discussed draw on literature in neuroscience, cultural relational theory and constructive developmental theory. /  / Method of delivery: /  / Case discussion, didactic /  / Connection to Conference Theme: / This session is directly related to the theme as culturally relevant pedagogy includes the need to be accurate and sensitive to culture and cultural knowledge and engage strategies that are effective in working with clients from diverse backgrounds. This presentation's focus will discuss how counselor educators can assist supervises in developing these core competencies. The presentation draws on relevant and current theory and scholarship to support the practices outlined. /  /  / Identify embedded cultural assumptions in supervisee conceptualization of culture and diversity issues that could lead to empathic breaks in counseling. Identify three interventions for assisting supervises to identify cultural encapsulations and increase skills in complex empathy. Synthesize frameworks using cognitive neuroscience, cultural relational and constructive developmental theory as foundations for effective engagement of supervision practices. This presentation describes three developmental practices that can be used to assist supervisees in developing awareness of cultural encapsulations that may unintentionally block authentic engagement with clients leading to impasse in session or an increased likelihood of dropping out of therapy.   Skills discussed draw on literature in cognitive neuroscience, cultural relational theory and constructive developmental theory.  Participants will be able to elucidate the types of experiences and a set of practices that will be meaningful to trainees in the development of multicultural awareness. / Gina Frieden Ph.D. Parrish Paul Ph.D.                     cultural competency supervision practices developmental framework
159 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A "I will Just Refer." Helping Counselors-in-Training Move Beyond Their Value-Based Biases. Rationale / This presentation will focus on importance of counselors adhering to ethical guidelines while working with clients who hold different values from theirs. There are serious implications of ethical violations that may arise in the event that counselors are unaware of their personal values, which poses the danger of imposing such values on the clients. The ACA Code of Ethics emphasizes the importance of counselor’s awareness of their personal values and “avoid imposing their own values, attitudes, beliefs and behavior” (ACA code of Ethics, A.4.b). Furthermore, the Code of Ethics (A.11.b) also admonishes counselors to “refrain from referring prospective or current clients based solely on the counselor’s personally held values, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors.” According to the code, counselors need to “respect the diversity of clients and seek training in areas in which they are at risk of imposing their values on clients…” (A.11.b).  / Counselor educators therefore have a mandate to train counselor-in-training to respect their client’s values. Demonstrating strategies and techniques of how to conduct difficult discussions with students who seem resistant and stuck to their values in an Ethics class will be a focus of this session.  The session will also expound on the responsibility of counselor educators in ensuring proper preparation of counselors-in-training in an effort to protect prospective counselors from causing harm to their clients.  / Program goals  / The session aims to equip and enhance counselor educator teaching strategies of ethics especially for students experiencing difficulties broadening their perspectives on different cultural values from their clients. The session will also explore the ethical and legal implications of using religious beliefs as a basis for refusing to counsel or referring certain clients.  / Delivery Method / This session will be an interactive round-table discussion. Hand-outs will be provided to participants.   / Connection to Conference Theme / Preparing future counselors who are culturally competent and who adhere to ethical guidelines is a mandate for every counseling program and counselor educator. Counselors who are unaware of their personal values might harm their clients by trying to impose their values on them. This program will equip counselor educators with techniques and strategies which will assist them in preparing counselors who are going to be leaders in advancing culturally appropriate interventions with their clients. This is in line with the theme of this conference of leadership for culturally relevant pedagogy and practice.  / 1. Learn effective strategies for teaching ethics students who are resistant to change. 2. Learn various causes of counselor resistance. 3. Learn how resistance may manifest itself in the classroom. Becoming a culturally competent counselor is an imperative for every counselor in the 21st century. Preparing graduate students to become culturally competent can pose certain challenges depending on where the counselors-in-training are at in their professional development. This round-table session will explore challenges of preparing students to overcome their value-based biases. The presenters will share personal experiences and the specific strategies they employed in their Ethics class and the outcome of such interventions. Participants will also be provided with opportunities to share their experiences and brain-storm additional strategies of teaching students who are resistant to change. GRACE WAMBU DOCTORATE MIHEE JEON                       Ethics Value-based biases Training
162 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Teaching Basic Interventions: Incorporating Cultural Awareness into Therapeutic Alliance-Building Skills with Counseling Students Rationale: Therapeutic alliance-building skills are generally accepted by counselors as necessary for effectiveness in the counseling process. Counselors should be aware of their own cultural predispositions and also understand the application of culture in building relationships with clients. Incorporating cultural awareness at the very base levels of teaching counseling skills gives good foundation to students’ understanding of the role of culture in relationships. This session will provide counselor educators with several useful strategies to incorporate cultural awareness in teaching basic skills and demonstrating cultural cognizance in the classroom. / Program Goals / 1. Identify and discuss strategies to assist counselor educators in raising student awareness of client cultural responses during basic skills training utilizing Dr. Paul Ekman’s research in how to read facial expressions. / 2. Reinforce the importance of cultural cognizance in building therapeutic alliance. / 3. Increase counselor educators’ ability to model cultural awareness while teaching counseling skills. /  Delivery Method / This session will include a presentation and experiential learning of several specific ways counselor educators can incorporate cultural awareness into the classroom. /  Connection to Theme / This session affirms the importance of building diversity awareness and integrating multiculturalism throughout a counselor training program, focusing on incorporating cultural cognizance into skills training. / Defend the value of incorporating cultural awareness into teaching therapeutic relationship skills Generate strategies for incorporating multicultural awareness techniques into the classroom utilizing Dr. Ekman’s research in facial expressions Illustrate using natural classroom diversity in building cultural awareness competency skills Building therapeutic alliance requires a mindful awareness of the role culture plays in relationships. Presenter will utilize Dr. Paul Ekman’s facial expression work to provide simple strategies to incorporate cultural awareness in teaching basic relationship-building skills to students. Audience members will be challenged to incorporate the natural diversity of their classrooms into a larger student awareness of the value of culture in therapeutic alliance. Brenda Ross MA                           Relationship Skills Diversity
160 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A Incorporating the Gender Spectrum into Doctoral Pedagogy: Beginning the Ripple Effect of Transequality in Mental Health Despite the recent attention and controversy the transgender community has recently received in the media, they are still remarkably underrepresented in counselor education training programs.  As a population that reports higher rates of discrimination, harassment, and systematic oppression, it is imperative that counselor educators and counselors-in-training alike are able to provide competent and ethical services to these neglected populations. By providing education and an open dialogue surrounding trans* issues to doctoral-level counselor education students, we can toss the first stone and start the greatly needed ripple effect of gender spectrum education. This vital educational piece begins with having an expanded awareness and knowledge of the full gender spectrum as it incorporates transgender, gender fluid, and gender neutral identities into the commonly referred binary-gender identities of ‘man’ and ‘woman’.  /  / Counselor educators have a duty to provide the education to their students that is needed to be competent counselors including an awareness and understanding of the non-binary gender identities. This roundtable will encourage a rich discussion between attendees and presenters of how current counselor educators can incorporate gender related discussions and activities into doctoral level pedagogy. Educators, supervisors, and students at any level are invited and encouraged to join this open conversation and start the ripple of transequality in mental health. Attendees will be provided with engaging and thought provoking discussion of the gender spectrum as it directly relates to client mental health. Attendees will be encouraged to broaden their perspectives of and challenge their current understanding of the term “gender”. Attendees will be encouraged to share in discussion with the presenters of how gender issues, particularly those related to non-binary genders, can be integrated into doctoral pedagogy. Before counselor educators can incorporate discussions of the increasingly visible transgender community into curriculum, it is necessary to first develop an expanded knowledge of the full gender spectrum. By incorporating this educational piece into doctoral pedagogy, we are ensuring students receive truly multiculturally competent and relevant training. Educators, supervisors, and students are invited to join this open conversation and start the ripple of transequality in mental health. Courtney East M.S.                           Gender Spectrum Transgender Pedagogy
163 1 11:00-11:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Enhancing the Counselor-In-Training’s Education Experience through Culturally Relevant Expressive Modalities Rationale  / Students in counseling programs come from diverse and varied backgrounds that impact their learning experiences and cultural viewpoints. At the same time, counseling students are preparing to embark on a journey in which they will work with culturally-diverse populations. Through the use of expressive modalities, counselor educators can enhance their curriculum and incorporate culturally-responsive activities within the context of the courses they provide through multi-sensory expression. /    Program Goals / • Increase awareness of opportunities to use expressive arts in various classes throughout the counseling curriculum.  / • Discuss new ways to integrate expressive arts. / • Provide opportunities to increase cultural awareness through integrating expressive arts. / Delivery Method  / The presenters will use interactive discussion, video demonstrations, and handouts to facilitate an open dialogue about the implementation of expressive modalities throughout the curriculum.  / Connection to Conference Theme  / Enhancing the Counselor Experience through Culturally Relevant Expressive Modalities connects to the conference theme by using expressive arts to integrate cultural awareness throughout the curriculum rather than in one specific class.  / Participants will learn about the rationale for integrating culturally-responsive experiential/expressive activities in counseling curriculum and the need to address multi-sensory learning. Participants will gain an enhanced knowledge of how to infuse expressive modalities throughout counseling curriculum. Participants will explore opportunities for increasing cultural awareness through expressive arts and considerations for implementation of these approaches in counseling curriculum. This roundtable discussion will focus on incorporating expressive modalities to promote professional and personal growth through allowing students to become more in touch with their inner experience in a connected and meaningful way that promotes deep, experiential learning. Participants will discuss and explore with facilitators how to incorporate creative activities that facilitate learning in a culturally-responsive method. / Eric Dafoe M.Ed. Sara Haas M.A.                     Counselor education culturally-responsive experiential learning
173 1.5 11:00-12:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 301 Accepted: Standardizing and Quantifying the Graduate Admissions Process for Counseling Programs Gatekeeping is a critical responsibility of counselor educators and supervisors that commences with graduate-level admissions. However, this is not a standardized process and often involves a great deal of subjectivity. In an attempt to standardize the admissions interview process and balance the subjectivity of candidate selection with objective measures, we analyzed the efficacy of all admission tools, examined both quantitative and qualitative evaluative measures, identified CACREP standards and ACA ethical guidelines related to gatekeeping and professional disposition, investigated methods for incorporating multicultural competence and exploration of values into the interview process, and reviewed the literature regarding GRE scores and undergraduate GPA as predictive measures. In this presentation, we discuss the findings of our literature review and describe how we utilized this review in the creation of admission procedures and standards as well as candidate acceptance for the counseling program at Northern Illinois University. Identify effective qualitative and quantitative evaluative tools to assist in selection of quality candidates for counseling programs; understand the strengths and limitations of evaluative scales; and understand the strengths and limitations of GRE scores and undergraduate GPA as predictive measures. Identify CACREP standards and ACA ethical guidelines relevant to candidate selection. Identify and understsand how to integrate this data into a more standardized and objective admissions process. Gatekeeping the counseling profession and developing talented counselors begins at graduate admissions. This presentation provides information on the efficacy of evaluative tools, the predictive value of GRE scores and undergraduate GPA, CACREP standards/ACA ethical guidelines related to gatekeeping and professional disposition, incorporating multicultural competence into the interview, and how that data can be utilized to standardize/quantify admission procedures/standards. Kari Mika MA Jane Rheineck PhD Suzy Wise Ed.S Lucy Parker MA Adriane Moody MS Patrick McMillion, MS.Ed, Northern Illinois University / Scott Adair Cox, MSW, Northern Illinois University Gatekeeping Admissions Evaluation
171 1.5 11:00-12:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 301 Fulfilling the Gatekeeper Role: Strategies for Counselor Educators and Supervisors Counselor educators and supervisors have a responsibility to serve as gatekeeper to ensure the training of effective counselors and protect the community (Bernard & Goodyear, 2014). Many obstacles can arise when gatekeeping, including (a) establishing and assessing competencies, (b) utilizing proactive methods, and (c) protecting against legal repercussions (Falender & Shafranske, 2004). While competencies of knowledge, skills, and attitudes have been established, a clear method of measuring these components has not been developed (Brear & Dorrian, 2010b; Johnson & Campbell, 2002). Clear evidence is needed to provide specific feedback and establish remediation strategies (CPA, 2009; Falender & Shafranske, 2004). Students who fail to remediate these deficits may require gatekeeping procedures that remove them from training (Brear & Dorrian, 2010b). /  / As such, there are four program goals.  / (1) To discuss the competencies for professional counselors and the research defining characteristics of effective counselors. / (2) To describe a multi-step gatekeeping strategy used in a CACREP-accredited program. / (3) To present assessment tools to assist supervisors and counselor educators with gatekeeping.  / (4) To review the research on effective interventions for students with deficits. /  / This program will incorporate Power Point presentation and discussion during a 50-minute education session. The theme of leadership for culturally relevant pedagogy and practice is integrally tied to this presentation. Gatekeeping skills are necessary for counselor educators and supervisors to be effective leaders. Further, programs with solid gatekeeping procedures will be more likely to produce strong leaders in counseling. / To describe the necessary competencies and personal qualities of professional counselors. To discuss counseling programs’ options for gatekeeping from interview through internship. To provide counselor educators and supervisors with strategies for effectively evaluating and remediating students’ deficits. This presentation will provide strategies for supporting counselor educators and supervisors through the challenging gatekeeping process. The presentation will include (a) competencies and characteristics of professional counselors, (b) plans for effective gatekeeping, (c) assessment tools for evaluating students, and (d) suggestions for remediation and gatekeeping interventions. Janet Muse-Burke Ph.D. Jennifer Barna Ph.D.                     gatekeeping remediation competencies
172 1.5 11:00-12:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 301 Students with Trauma History: Gatekeeping Considerations As counselor educators, one of the expectations we place on our students is to explore their personal biases, hot buttons, and overall worldviews.  We also have an expectation that students explore how their personal backgrounds and family history might influence their future work with clients. Some students entering counseling programs may not have the emotional stability to effectively meet these challenges.  In particular, students with a trauma history may be triggered by the content and process of exploring their own pasts.  While a trauma history does not preclude someone from being an effective counselor, it may be difficult to determine in the admissions process whether students have worked through their personal issues sufficiently to be able to engage effectively in the self-analysis required in the training process. Because it is not uncommon for  people who have sought therapy in the past to be interested in the counseling profession, it is important that we consider ways of being culturally sensitive to those in our classroom who may have a history of trauma or other mental health concerns.   / The presenters will provide a case example, including the ways in which a specific situation was handled and considerations for future situations. Participants will be invited to share additional examples.  Presenters will provide a summary of research on gatekeeping in the counseling profession and the importance of emotional stability in counselors and counselors-in-training.  There will also be discussion around the ethical responsibilities of serving as both gatekeepers, who are focused on the standards of the profession, and counselors, concerned about the well-being of our students. /  / 1. Participants will be provided a summary of research on gatekeeping, specifically around issues of emotional stability in counselors and counselors-in-training. 2. Participants will be invited to discuss case examples of student situations related to gatekeeping and emotional stability, and to brainstorm specific strategies for addressing these dilemmas. 3. Participants will be invited to discuss the ethical responsibilities of our roles as gatekeepers and counselors, and effective ways to balance these roles. Some students entering counseling programs may not have the emotional stability to engage effectively in the self-analysis required in the counseling training process. In particular, students with a trauma history may be triggered by the content and process of exploring their own pasts. This session will include a summary of research on gatekeeping (specifically around issues of emotional stability), a case example, and discussion of effective ways to balance our roles as gatekeepers and counselors. Kerrie Fuenfhausen PhD                           gatekeeping emotional stability counselors-in-training
174 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 401 Advocacy in action: Infusing the counselor education curriculum with social change This presentation examines the role of advocacy within the context of counselor education. Preparing students to incorporate advocacy as an element of their professional identity must be an intentional process. Counselors in training are often intimidated to take action, feeling powerless to make changes in larger systems. Making advocacy an underlying foundation for counselor education can increase confidence and competence in this professional function.  /  / The presenters will describe the process by which students are challenged to consider how they will incorporate advocacy throughout their academic and professional lives. Examples of relevant social change and advocacy initiatives will be explored as they relate to counselor training curricula. Student social change projects and perspectives will be shared through videos, project proposals, and interactive online content. Participants will be encouraged to share how their programs integrate advocacy as a cornerstone of professional identity.  /  / This program emphasizes the importance of social justice/social change as a key component of culturally relevant counselor education pedagogy. / Demonstrate ways advocacy can be incorporated into counselor education curriculum Explore social change initiatives in the context of counselor education programs Discuss the role of counselor education programs in prioritizing social change/justice This presentation examines the role of advocacy within the context of counselor education. Preparing students to incorporate advocacy as an element of their professional identity must be an intentional process. Counselors in training are often intimidated to take action, feeling powerless to make changes in larger systems. Making advocacy an underlying foundation for counselor education can increase confidence and competence in this professional function.  /  / The presenters will describe the process by which students are challenged to consider how they will incorporate advocacy throughout their academic and professional lives. Examples of relevant social change and advocacy initiatives will be explored as they relate to counselor training curricula. Participants will be encouraged to share how their programs integrate advocacy as a cornerstone of professional identity.  / Esther Benoit PhD Robyn Simmons EdD Kristi Cannon PhD               social justice/change advocacy  
175 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 309 EXAMINING THE POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGICAL CAPITAL OF ADULT SURVIVORS OF CHILDHOOD TRAUMA AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS Rationale: / Adult survivors of childhood trauma have been studied extensively but this has been done most often through a deficit and pathological lens.  Rather than focusing on the negative consequences of trauma, researchers explore positive psychological capacities and resources that can empower and enhance the holistic well-being of adult survivors of childhood trauma.  Integrating conceptual framework from Positive Psychology and Positive Organizational Behavior into Counseling, the construct of Psychological Capital (PsyCap) is examined in light of post-trauma growth through a small scale empirical study.  / Program Goals: / The researchers describe the theoretical framework of PsyCap and explore connections to any kind of trauma in childhood among adult survivors. This presentation would focus on the highlighted results of the research study done among college students in the Mid-Western region of the United States. Additionally, the role of culture in experiencing and making meaning of trauma will be discussed to aid in better service to college-age clients. Finally, for enhancing knowledge and competence of mental health professionals, strategies and techniques that may be adapted from leadership and advocacy standpoint while working with adult survivors of trauma in colleges are presented. / Methods of Delivery: / The presentation targets both basic and advanced professionals who work with college students in clinical or academic settings. Practical and innovative tools of positive psychology would be shared through activities, which may be utilized with students or clients. Discussion prompts will be utilized to challenge participants to apply positive psychological interventions in their own work.  Towards the end of the session time will be allocated for questions. Additional resources and relevant information would be shared via handouts. / Connection to conference Theme: / In this presentation the role of cultures in perceiving, experiencing, and making meaning of trauma would be discussed. Additionally, as presenters would also take advantage of their various cultural and ethnic backgrounds by sharing various significant, sensitive, and crucial issues that a mental health professional may anticipate and be cautioned about while working with adult survivors of trauma. Leadership and advocacy tips would be shared. 1. To widen our existing knowledge on childhood trauma and its influence on adult psychological functioning through a relatively new lens of positive conceptual framework called Psychological Capital. 2. To enhance multicultural competence of dealing with diverse college student population on sensitive topics such as childhood trauma. Focus would be on the crucial component of skills and leadership development within these areas. 3. To explore practical and innovative positive psychological tools that mental health practitioners can use with childhood trauma survivors’ in college campuses. These tools would foster development of individual’s Psychological Capital. Historically, adult survivors of childhood trauma have been studied extensively but most often from a negative lens. Less is known about college students who have experienced childhood trauma in terms of psychological functioning and well-being as they encounter challenges in life along with peers who have not experienced similar traumatic experiences. This exploratory empirical study aims to widen our existing knowledge on childhood trauma, role of culture, and its influence on adult functioning through the lens of a positive construct- Psychological Capital (PsyCap) which includes hope, efficacy, resilience, and optimism. Practical and innovative PsyCap tools for practitioners to use with adult survivors of childhood trauma will be shared. Priscilla Selvaraj MSc, MBA Christine Bhat PhD                     Psycholological Capital Childhood Trauma College Students
176 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 411 A Family Affair: A Professional Development Module Focused on Collaboration Between Schools and Families School-family collaboration is an element of professional school counseling supported by the American School Counselor Association as a means of impacting student success. Professional school counselors provide services in multiple ways, including through the establishment of productive partnerships with parents and families. Training for professional school counselors includes several relevant topics for serving children in diverse elementary and secondary schools; however, this training typically does not include coursework concerning family development and processes. The professional development module at the center of this presentation sought to expand the knowledge base and skills of elementary and middle school counselors through an exploration of family development and processes with the goal being that counselors would be better able to serve their clientele. This education session will include a description of the content of the module and its applicability to school counseling as well as a discussion of the effectiveness of the module for the professional school counselors who participated in it. The goal of this session is to provide the attendees with practical ways that they can enrich the understanding that school counseling students and practicing school counselors have of the diverse families with which they collaborate in order to improve case conceptualization and school-family relationships. To discuss ways in which this module supports professional school counselors in their culturally informed collaboration with parents and families To discuss the merits, limitations, and effects of the module in terms of its relevance for professional school counselors To discuss further methods of preparing professional school counselors to build effective relationships between schools and the families they serve School-family collaboration is an element of professional school counseling supported by the American School Counselor Association as a means of impacting student success. A professional development module was offered to practicing school counselors that focused on family development and processes and sought to support school counselors in their efforts to collaborate with families. This session will explore the details of the module and discuss the evaluation of the module’s effectiveness in supporting school-family collaboration. J. Richelle Joe MSEd Pamela N. Harris MSEd Amy Williams MSEd               professional development collaboration school counseling
177 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 412 Teaching Counselors to Improve Multicultural Counseling Practice by Leveraging the Therapeutic Relationship Rationale: The therapeutic relationship can be used to join with clients of various multicultural backgrounds and promote outcome effectiveness.  The presenter assessed the extent to which therapeutic relationship predicted outcome effectiveness with culturally-diverse clients at a training clinic.  It was determined that 25% of the variance in outcome effectiveness can be predicted by the quality of the therapeutic relationship across the first three sessions.  Counselor educators and supervisors can teach counselors intentional techniques to foster the therapeutic relationship and support outcome effectiveness.   /  / Goals:  / To explore the importance of the therapeutic relationship in multicultural counseling / To teach concrete methods for fostering the therapeutic relationship / To present the current research findings and identify avenues for future research /  / Delivery Method: The importance of the therapeutic relationship in multicultural counseling will be explained, and concrete methods for teaching counselors to foster the therapeutic relationship will be provided.  Participants will role-play the various techniques, and an open discussion for questions and comments will be held. /  / Connection to Theme: Counselor educators and supervisors should understand the importance of the therapeutic relationship in multicultural counseling.  Counselors should be taught concrete ways to intentionally foster the therapeutic relationship in effective, multiculturally-competent counseling. Participants will be able to explain the importance of the therapeutic relationship in multicultural counseling Participants will be able to identify three ways to teach counselors concrete methods for fostering the therapeutic relationship Participants will understand the current research findings and explore avenues for future research The therapeutic relationship can be used to join with clients of various multicultural backgrounds and promote outcome effectiveness.  The presenter assessed the extent to which therapeutic relationship predicted outcome effectiveness with culturally-diverse clients at a training clinic, and the importance of the therapeutic relationship will be explained.  Concrete methods for teaching counselors to foster the therapeutic relationship will be provided, and participants will role-play the various techniques.  An open discussion for questions and comments will be held. Nicole Stargell Ph. D.                           therapeutic relationship outcome effectiveness multicultural
178 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 302 The Evolution of Learning:  Online Programs, Counselor Education, and the Therapeutic Relationship Proposal Description & Connection to Conference Theme: /  / Students are increasingly seeking out Counselor Education programs that are both effective and convenient. Advances in technology and shifts in the culture of education have given rise to online learning and the number of online Counseling programs is growing. Despite this growth, research on the effectiveness of online programs is still in its infancy.   /  / This presentation addresses new research exploring differences in the preparation of online and on-campus Counseling students. Recognizing the importance of the therapeutic relationship in counseling outcomes, the research examined online vs. on-campus students’ performance on the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Examination (CPCE) subscales, with a particular emphasis on the Helping Relationships subscale.   /  / The presentation will discuss the findings of this study while examining potential and emerging differences in the education of online and on-campus counseling students, and implications for the development of counselor education programs.  /  / Goals:   /  / 1. To explore differences in the performance of Counseling students based on program modality on the CPCE subscales / 2. To discuss future research needs and directions for online learning / 3. To discuss the challenges and opportunities that come with online programming, and to suggest implications for Counselor Education programs /  / Delivery Method:  50-minute Education Session with discussion and questions/answers / Participants will learn of existing differences in the academic preparation of online versus on-campus Counseling students, and between online and on-campus student performance on the CPCE subscales. Participants will learn three advantages and challenges that online and on-campus program modalities face, with discussion of the research supporting new techniques and platforms in Counselor preparation. Participants will learn three important directions for future research in establishing the comparative efficacy of online and on-campus Counselor Education program modalities in preparing Counselors for careers as mental health professionals. The ability to establish a strong client-counselor alliance is the foundation of successful therapeutic outcomes.  Are online and on-campus Counseling students equally prepared in this critical area?  This presentation discusses research comparing online and on-campus student performance on the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Exam subscales, with particular emphasis on the Helping Relationships subscale.  Implications for the field will be discussed. Gregory Elliott MA Chaya Abrams MA Adriana DeRaet MA Deanna McCulloch MA         Online learning CPCE Helping Relationships
179 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 303 Fostering Leadership and Reflection: Group Counseling Course Experiencial Activities Experiential activities with critical reflection have been established as a foundational element in promoting personal and professional transformative insight (Friere, 1970; Kolb, 1984). Creative experiential activities in the classroom can help students connect with each other as well as with their clients. This connection can provide new potentials for social justice action, cultural sensitivity, and leadership transformation by opening personal and professional perspectives not previously gained.  An overview of experiential learning in a group counseling class will be presented along with sample exercises with their CACREP accreditation standard for group counseling. Participants will gain a toolbox of experiential activities that address a variety of educational styles that make group counseling more meaningful, personal, effective and fun.  This interactive discussion will be based on the instructor’s delivery format of the lesson plans and student reflective perspectives of how they were changed and challenged by the exercises. Broaden pedagogical foundation for teaching group counseling Integrate cultural sensitivity and leadership perspectives into group counseling activities Implement multiple experiential learning activities into group course with CACREP standards Experiential activities with critical reflection have been established as a foundational element in promoting personal and professional transformative insight (Friere, 1970; Kolb, 1984). Creative experiential activities in the classroom can help students connect with each other as well as with their clients. This connection can provide new potentials for social justice action, cultural sensitivity, and leadership transformation by opening personal and professional perspectives.  An overview of experiential learning in a group counseling class is presented along with sample exercises with their CACREP accreditation standard for group counseling. A toolbox of experiential activities that address a variety of educational styles is provided Rebecca Tadlock-Marlo PhD                           Group Pedagogy Experiencial
180 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 304 Counselors Within the Chronic Care Model:  Supporting Weight Management With relevant training in behavioral, addiction, and body image disorders, coupled with an emphasis on wellness, mental health counselors are poised to play a more active role in assisting clients with weight loss and weight maintenance.  Like many other chronic health conditions, the treatment of obesity is not particularly suited to the standard health care system developed around the diagnosis and treatment of acute conditions and symptoms.  Instead, the treatment of obesity, with its multifactorial etiology, is better suited to a multidisciplinary, comprehensive, and collaborative approach, such as the Chronic Care Model (CCM).  This presentation will elaborate on the vital and essential role of mental health counselors within each of the six components of the CCM for weight management:  (a) health care organization, (b) delivery-system design, (c) clinical information systems, (d) decision support, (e) client self-management support, and (f) community resources.   /  / This interactive Power-Point presentation will include information on the:  (a) physical, psychological, sociocultural, and environmental factors contributing to weight gain, (b) role of counselors within the CCM in providing weight management support, and (c) implications for counselor education and public policy.  Within the six components of the CCM, counselors are able to provide integral support to clients and the team of health care professionals assisting clients with weight management. Recognize the physiological, psychological, and sociocultural factors that contribute to both obesity and common mental health disorders Provide more effective weight management support to clients Empathize more fully with clients who struggle to maintain a healthy weight With relevant training in behavioral, addiction, and body image disorders, coupled with an emphasis on wellness, counselors are poised to play a more active role in assisting clients with weight loss and weight management within an integrated care model such as the Chronic Care Model (CCM).  This presentation will include information on the:  (a) physical, psychological, sociocultural, and environmental factors contributing to weight gain, (b) role of counselors within the CCM in providing weight management support, and (c) implications for counselor education and public policy. Alison Sheesley M.S.                           integrated care wellness obesity
181 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 305 Is it Racist?  Addressing Racial Microaggressions in Counselor Education Racism is experienced regularly by individuals of Color in both personal and professional arenas. It can be overt or subtle, yet either form can profoundly impact persons’ emotional and physical wellness (Okazaki, 2009). Racial microaggressions are defined as: “Brief, commonplace, daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults toward people of color” (Sue et al., 2007, p. 271). Well-intentioned White counselors may fail to recognize their own microaggressive acts or comments borne from those normative beliefs. To engage in counseling with persons who have experienced racism, it is essential that White therapists themselves are comfortable with a topic often considered taboo, and that they understand the impact of race-based trauma on Individuals of Color (Braynt-Davis & Ocampo, 2005). In order to do so, it is essential to first understand racism in its various formations. Once there is a clear understanding of these types of racism that exist, and what both theory and empirical evidence say about them, counselors can learn how to recognize and best approach these situations that likely occur around them on a daily basis.  /  / This presentation strives to increase counselor educators understanding of ways to teach students to recognize, and intervene in, more subtle forms of racism.  This goal aligns closely with the conference theme of ‘Leadership for Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Practice’ as it provides skills in addressing a highly relevant topic in counselor education (e.g., issues of racial discrimination) / Attendees will gain personal knowledge through an activity meant to promote self-exploration, taken from a Whiteness course designed and instructed by the presenters. Attendees will gain knowledge and awareness of the many types of microaggressions that occur. Facilitators will provide concrete examples that can be immediately implemented in daily life. Attendees will be offered practice and modeling in ways to facilitate discussion of the topic of microaggressions. Hurtful words and actions can be enacted by well-intentioned and compassionate persons who are completely unaware of the harm inflicted. In a society where Whites can experience race and racism as frightening and taboo topics of discussion, how can we learn to recognize and address our own and/or others’ racial biases? How can we present the topic in a less threatening way?  Answers to such questions will emerge through engagement in an interactive activity regarding racial microaggresions—persons from all racial categories are invited to participate! Krista Malott PhD Tina Paone PhD Scott Schaefle PhD               Multicultural Counseling Diversity Racism
182 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 306 Compassion Fatigue and Vicarious Trauma In Counselor Educators Counselor educators function in the context of higher education where burnout is often high among faculty as a result of increasing scholarly requirements; large teaching loads with expectations for positive teaching evaluations and influence of university politics. In addition to university requirements, counselor educators have a unique role in the counseling profession – from educator, supervisor and mentor to evaluator of students and gatekeeper of the profession.  These roles require the counselor educator to develop quality student-faculty relationships to both educate and assess student-counselors.  Little is known about the impact student’s mental, physical or life tragedies have on the job satisfaction of counselor educators. This mixed methods sequential explanatory design identified the prevalence of compassion fatigue among counselor educators and what protects or increases the counselor educators’ likelihood of developing compassion fatigue. Results of study and implications for practice  will be explained.  / Delivery and Goals: Presenters will engage participants in conversation about experiences of vicarious trauma and ways to mitigate and prevent this phenomenon after a review of the data and results.  Participants will learn about vicarious trauma, counselor educators’ experiences with VT and how to potential mitigate and prevent it.  / The theme of the conference is ACES Leadership for Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Practice.  All educators could experience vicarious trauma and without understanding what that is, what it may look like for educators, and how to work with our students and families to prevent this, many of us could become impaired and not be able to engage in the practice of culturally relevant pedagogy and practice.  / Learn about the concept of Compassion Fatigue and Vicarious Trauma Learn about counselor educators' experiences with Vicarious Trauma after a nationwide survey How to mitigate and prevent vicarious trauma in self and peers Counselor educators function in the context of higher education where fatigue is often high among faculty. We have a unique role in the counseling profession – from educator, supervisor and mentor to evaluator of students and gatekeeper of the profession. This mixed methods sequential explanatory design identified the prevalence of compassion fatigue among counselor educators and what protects or increases the counselor educators’ likelihood of developing compassion fatigue. Results of study and implications for practice will be explained. Keely Hope PhD Rebecca Rudd PhD                     counselor educator vicarious trauma wellness
183 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 307 Creating a Culture of Trauma-Sensitive, Multi-culturally Competent Counselors: A Model for Clinical Supervision In work with individuals and families, mental health professionals are privy to disturbing accounts of violent crime, physical and sexual abuse, neglect and great personal loss.  The implications of trauma are devastating to the physical and psychological development of children and have long-term implications upon overall mental health.  In order to effectively treat traumatized individuals, a therapist must attain a thorough understanding of the impact of trauma upon the individual and the family system. This presentation will empower the clinical supervisor with practical trauma-informed principles to promote healing and resilience in traumatized individuals.  Models for culturally sensitive and strength-based clinical and peer supervision will be explored. The presenter will specifically address strategies to assist the supervisee in avoiding vicarious traumatization and re-traumatizing the client.  The presenter will also facilitate experiential activities to assist the clinical supervisor and supervisee in developing specific self-care plans to prevent compassion fatigue and subsequent burnout in their practice with traumatized individuals and families. The participant will attain knowledge of the impact of trauma upon individuals and family systems.  Principles of trauma-informed care will be addressed. The participant will be able to identify 5 components of a strength-based culturally sensitive model of supervision. Emphasis will be on empowering direct service providers to promote healing and resilience in traumatized individuals and families. The participant will be able to identify strategies for avoiding re-traumatization of the client.  The presentation will also equip clinical supervisors with the tools to prevent vicarious traumatization and compassion fatigue in work with traumatized individuals and families. This presentation will explore models for culturally sensitive and strength-based clinical and peer supervision. Strategies to assist the supervisee in avoiding vicarious traumatization and re-traumatizing the client will be addressed.  The presenter will also facilitate experiential activities to assist the clinical supervisor and supervisee in developing specific self-care plans to prevent compassion fatigue and subsequent burnout in their practice with traumatized individuals and families. / Josephine Olson MA                           Trauma-Informed Multi-cultural Supervision
184 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 308 Going Green: Supervising the First Year Counselor The purpose of this workshop to provide counselor educators and supervisors with significant information regarding challenging areas for first-year counselors, including cultural considerations of both the counselor and the client. Recent graduates that have obtained first-time professional positions can face concerns with accomplishing the developmental tasks of competence, creating professional identity, and self-efficacy regarding crisis intervention and clinical skills. Additionally, first-year counselors can struggle with finding balance between idealized career expectations and the realistic requirements of the job position. These challenges can lead to job dissatisfaction, early job turnover, and early burnout in their counseling careers. Supervision for the first-year counselor may include focusing on self-care, administrative responsibilities, treatment planning, documentation, and crisis intervention training rather than emphasizing on clinical review. Supervisors may also need to foster first-year counseling skills in the areas of collaboration, advocacy, consultation, and peer support. 1. Attendees will be able to articulate at least 5 challenges that first-year counselors encounter 2. Attendees will  be able identify and demonstrate at least 3 supervisory techniques to enhance the experience of supervision for the first-year counselor. Attendees will be able to identify at least 3 cultural considerations of supervision with inexperienced cunselors. While there is much attention given to the supervision of practicum and internship students, there is little time expended on discussing the particular challenges faced by beginning graduates.  Often faced with situations that have not been covered in graduate school and required to obtain around 100 hours of supervision for licensure, these individuals often cannot distinguish between good and poor supervisory experiences.  This interactive workshop will examine components that lead to a fulfilling supervisory experience for beginning counselors by keying in on the developmental tasks of the supervisee and examining techniques which support growth as a counselor. Diane Clark PhD Megan Boyd MS                     Supervisor First year counselor  
185 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 403 Culturally Relevant Pedagogy: Infusion of Military as a Culture Military culture contains its own artifacts (Fenell, 2008), language, and values (Monroe, 2012) that significantly impact military personnel and their families before, during, and after deployment. According to the Department of Defense Task Force on Mental Health (2007), over half of military personnel reported difficulties associated with stress, depression, relationships, and other psychosocial issues. With veterans’ needs continuing to diversify, counselors and counselor educators must provide culturally competent mental health services. However, the majority of counseling professionals report having a lack of skills and background necessary to work with this population (Capella University, 2008). The purpose of this presentation is to explore the intricacies of military identity using a multicultural lens. Participants learn about elements of military culture, but also teaching ideas for infusion of military culture using common evidence-based theories from counseling research. Additionally, we provide concrete strategies to incorporate the military population into multicultural curriculum. The presenters incorporate attention to CACREP standards and ACA (2014) ethical guidelines to promote holistic teaching pedagogy. Increase knowledge and awareness of the military population as a culture & apply multicultural competencies to the military population. Integrate strategies for teaching about military culture into the diversity curriculum using evidence-based counseling models. Discuss implications for the role of counselor educators, counseling students, and practitioners in providing culturally competent mental health services to the military population. The purpose of this presentation is to explore the intricacies of military identity using a multicultural lens. Participants learn about elements of military culture, but also teaching ideas for infusion of military culture using common evidence-based models. Additionally, we provide concrete strategies to incorporate the military population into multicultural curriculum. The presenters attend to CACREP standards and ACA ethical guidelines to promote holistic teaching pedagogy. Eric Price MA Cynthia M. Bevly MS Elizabeth Prosek Ph.D.               Counselor Education Military Muliticultural
186 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 406 Provider Competencies in Animal Assisted Therapy in Counseling: A Qualitative Study Rationale: / Animal Assisted Therapy in Counseling (AAT-C) is defined as the incorporation of specially trained and evaluated animals into the counseling process in ways that are beyond the scope of traditional counselor-client relationships (Chandler, 2012; Stewart, Chang & Rice, 2013). When implemented with the appropriate education and training, AAT-C has the potential to impact the therapeutic experience of a diverse range of clients across a wide variety of settings in a highly positive manner (Fine, 2004). Although AAT-C represents a specialty area within professional counseling that requires a specialized set of skills and competencies (Stewart, Chang & Rice, 2013) and numerous studies emphasize the importance of clearly defined AAT-C competencies, there is currently no definition of counseling-specific competencies to guide practitioners in this specialty area. The purpose of this qualitative study was to define the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are essential for professional counselors wishing to implement AAT-C.  / Goals: / The presenters aim to inform counselor educators, supervisors, and professional counselors about the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required of competent AAT-C practitioners so that they may be informed aides to students and supervisees interested in utilizing AAT-C.  / Delivery Method: / Key points will be outlined in a structured discussion. Attendees will be invited to engage in discussion and encouraged to ask questions throughout the education session.  / Connection to Theme: / AAT-C is applicable to a diverse range of populations and presenting concerns. Further, culturally relevant considerations emerged in this study as a critically important aspect of competence in AAT-C.  / 1. Define Animal Assisted Therapy in Counseling (AAT-C) and discuss the knowledge, skills, and attitudes appropriate to competency in AAT-C, including ethical and multicultural considerations. 2. Identify appropriate steps and resources towards training competent AAT-C practitioners. 3. Discuss the use of qualitative research designs in professional competency research. Animal Assisted Therapy in Counseling (AAT-C) represents a specialty area in professional counseling that requires a specialized set of skills and competencies. However, no current definition of counseling-specific competencies exists to guide practitioners in this specialty area. The purpose of this qualitative study was to define the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are required for professional counselors wishing to implement AAT-C. Leslie Stewart Ph.D. Catherine Chang Ph.D. Kristen Lister M.Coun. Jade Letourneau M.S. Heidi McKinley M.S.   Animal Assisted Therapy Professional Competency Qualitative Research
187 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 407 Rolling Out Our Yoga Mats in Counselor Education for Holistic Care: Integrating Yoga in Counseling Supervision and Training Yoga is a fundamentally ancient spiritual practice that was borne and cultivated in India for at least five thousand years. Practiced by millions of people internationally, yoga is gaining rapid popularity, suggesting that yoga transcends cultural, ethnic, racial, and religious boundaries. Despite the growing body of literature on the curative effects of yoga, there is a pronounced gap in understanding how yoga and counseling can complement each other to optimize the well being of counselors and clients within the context of counselor education research, theory, and clinical practice. Incorporating yoga into counselor education and supervision offers a holistic paradigm for culturally responsive pedagogy and practice. This seminar offers the dual perspective of counseling and anthropology, and addresses the compelling need for counselor educators and counselors to gain an in-depth understanding on yoga and its compatibility with counseling theory and practice. Drawing upon the eight limbs of yoga, participants will gain a deeper understanding of the underpinnings of yoga philosophy, the primary functions and benefits of yoga, and the myriad types of yoga commonly practiced in the United States. The presenters will share a proposed holistic paradigm of yoga with participants in considering how yoga principles can be incorporated into the theory and practice of counselor education training and supervision. This interactive and experiential seminar will also provide participants with an opportunity to engage in a critical discussion on the future of yoga in the counseling field, given the growing number of counselors who are trained yoga teachers. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of the underpinnings of yoga  philosophy, the primary functions and benefits of yoga, and the myriad types of yoga  commonly practiced in the United States. Participants will be able to make informed decisions for client referrals to  yoga based on clients’ specific needs and construct guiding questions to help facilitate clients’  yoga experience complementary to counseling. Participants will explore ways in which yoga principles can be incorporated  in the theory and practice of counselor education training and supervision. Practiced by millions of people internationally, yoga is gaining rapid popularity, suggesting that yoga transcends cultural, ethnic, racial, and religious boundaries. Despite the growing body of literature on the curative effects of yoga, there is a pronounced gap in understanding how yoga and counseling can complement each other in counselor education training and supervision. This interactive and experiential seminar offers the dual perspective of counseling and anthropology, and participants will be engaged in a critical discussion on the future of yoga and counseling. Jennifer Isabelle Ong M.S. Corinne Ong Doctoral                     yoga holistic cultural
188 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 408 The Dynamic Leadership in Counseling Scale – Self-Report (DLCS-SR): Implications for Research and Practice Leadership is essential for the continued success of the profession of counseling (Chang et al., 2012; Paradise, Ceballos, & Hall, 2010; Wolf, 2011), and scholars have highlighted the importance of researching and training counselors as leaders. However, counseling leadership research, training, and education is hindered by lack comprehensive leadership measurement. The purpose of this program is to introduce attendees to the Dynamic Leadership in Counseling Scale – Self-Report (DLCS-SR), an instrument that was developed out of the Dynamic Model of Counseling Leadership (McKibben, Umstead, & Borders, 2014). The DLCS-SR is a needed first step toward measuring counseling leadership, thus paving the way for rigorous research. Through a combination of didactic and discussion-based delivery, attendees will learn about the development of this measure and the implications for leadership research and training. The DLCS-SR is intimately tied to concepts of professional and client advocacy, social justice, and systemic leadership efforts, which ties in well with the conference theme of culturally relevant pedagogy and practice. Attendees will be able to: 1) identify steps taken in the development of the DLCS-SR 2) identify core concepts of counseling leadership as measured by the DLCS-SR 3) discuss implications of counseling leadership measurement on research and training Counseling leadership research and training is limited by lack of a valid and reliable leadership measure. This presentation details the development of a new counseling-specific leadership measure that was designed to address this need. The DLCS-SR was flexibly designed to be used as a research and feedback tool for counseling leaders. Results of an initial validation study will be reviewed, along with implications for research and training. William McKibben                             Leadership Measurement Research
189 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 409 Sexual Minority Mental Health Practitioners and Minority Stress: Implications in Counselor Burnout and Coping Minority stress theory states that tensions emerge when the values of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) persons are in a state of conflict with heteronormative culture (Meyer, 2003). As a result, LGBQ individuals are at an increased risk of psychological and physical health concerns, and susceptible to hardships in the world-of-work (Brewster et al., 2013). Minority stress could also possibly influence LGBQ identified counselors particularly in the area of burnout (Viehl & Dispenza, 2014). Program goals for this presentation include: (a) discussing the influence of minority stress and workplace contexts for counselors; (b) discussing the influence that minority stress has on correlates of counselor behavior; (c) explicating results from a recent quantitative study examining the influence that minority stress has on burnout and social support among LGBQ counselors. Content will be delivered via an abbreviated didactic portion, utilizing a PowerPoint, and will also integrate small open group discussions.  Presentation will conclude with a large open group discussion. The presentation relates to the theme of culturally relevant pedagogy in its examination of sexual and gender minority counselors and pedagogical implications for training and supervision Increase participant understanding of influences of minority stress and workplace contexts for counselors Increase participant knowledge of minority stress and correlates of counselor behavior Increase participant knowledge of correlates of burnout, social support, and minority stress among LGBQ counselors Minority stress postulates that tensions emerge when the values of LGBQ persons are in a state of conflict with the heteronormative culture (Meyer, 2003). As such, minority stress could influence LGBQ identified counselors, particularly in the area of burnout and support (Viehl & Dispenza, 2014). This presentation will discuss the influence that minority stress has on workplace contexts for counselors, and explore results from a recent quantitative study examining the influence of minority stress on LGBQ counselors. Cory Viehl M.S. Rafe McCullough M.A. Jonathan Standish B.S.               LGBTQ Minority Stress Burnout
190 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 402 Infusing Wellness into Counselor Supervision to prevent Burnout Burnout in the counseling profession is a serious risk as burnout can be a barrier to quality care for clients and a range of physical and mental health risks for counselors (Cummins, Massey & Jones, 2007; Myers & Sweeney, 2009; Tanrikulu, 2012). Burnout can be defined as “the sense of failure, the loss of energy in the working area, and insensitivity to the profession and to the people served… losing energy and objectivity in profession, forming indifference and listlessness in relationships among people and also in the profession, and emotional exhaustion emerging out of overloaded work” (Tanrikulu, 2012).  Burnout can be demonstrated through emotional exhaustion (which has also been called compassion fatigue), cynicism, and irritability. TWellness has also been defined as “a way of life oriented toward optimal health and well-being, in which body, mind, and spirit are integrated by the individual to live life more fully within the human and natural community” (Myers, Sweeney, & Witmer, 2000, p. 252). /  / Supervisors provide a safe space to work through difficult client dilemmas and have a unique opportunity to recognize early signs of vicarious trauma and burnout, as well as the ability to promote wellness practices with counselors as a priority to continue a healthy, thriving practice in any setting. Clinical supervision has been consistently shown to improve stress management for care providers, decrease burnout, and ensure proper case management (Koive, Saarinen & Hyrkas, 2011; Mackereth, Whilte, Cowthorn & Lynch, 2005).  /  / This educational and experiential session will review ways to identify early signs of counselor burnout, a wide lens of defining wellness practices and beliefs from a multicultural perspective, and offer opportunities to learn and practice ways of incorporating wellness into supervision. This session will include didactic portions utilizing handout and powerpoint, as well as opportunities for live practice in experiential portions. Participants will learn how to identify burnout risk factors through supervision. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of various wellness principals, values and practices from a multicultural perspective. Participants will learn and practice suggested techniques and practices to facilitate conversation about and promotion of wellness practices with supervisees. Counselors practice at the forefront of society with exposure to some of the most difficult human experiences through working with clients. Most, if not all, counselors have experienced some degree of vicarious trauma, which if left unattended to can lead to counselor professional and personal burnout as well as a potential risk to client care. This educational and experiential session will review ways to identify early signs of counselor burnout, a wide lens of defining wellness practices and beliefs from a multicultural perspective, and offer opportunities to learn and practice ways of incorporating wellness into supervision. Emily Teague-Palmieri MS, EdS Jack Culbreth PhD                     Supervision Multicultural Wellness Burnout/ Vicarious Trauma
199 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A Innovative Instruction in Teaching Cultural and Social Diversity A round table discussion will aid in understanding effective teaching methods for cultural and social diversity education underlining the need for leadership in cultural pedagogy and practice. In teaching graduate counseling students cultural and social diversity, are there adjunctive and complementary techniques that can be used to facilitate a deeper understanding of cultures? The use of service learning, volunteer projects, guest lectures, film, and cultural family genograms deepen awareness into the students own cultural upbringing but also in helping to understand others. In this diverse time of needing to be sensitive and culturally aware of others, as well as one’s own culture, it appears imperative to have more tools at ones disposal for aid in teaching cultural and social diversity course work effectively. Goals for this round table discussion will be: / 1. Increase awareness of cultural and social diversity educational standards / 2. Offer insights and creative techniques to help students understand cultural issues.  / 3. Provide a model for supervisors to help students and counselors in training to work effectively with diverse populations. / Learn educational standards for teaching cultural and social diversity Learn new and creative techniques in teaching students about cultural and social diversity Learn supervision model to help students work in cultural and socially diverse communities This round table discussion will aid in understanding effective and innovative methods in teaching cultural and social diversity.  Conversation will highlight adjunctive and complementary techniques that can be used to facilitate a deeper understanding of cultures. The use of service learning, volunteer projects, guest lectures, film, and cultural family genograms will be the focus of this interactive dialog. Attention will also be given to supervision models that may help in training student counselors in culturally and socially diverse settings. Katherine Jackson Ph.D.                           cultural and social diversity education innovation
208 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Contemporary Pornography and Adolescent Relationships Internet pornography has become more widely utilized than any previous traditional forms of erotic media (Chen, Leung, Chen, and Yang, 2013).  Adolescent use of sexual media has been associated with a wide array of concerns (Hald, Malamuth & Yuen, 2010; Malamuth, Hald, & Koss, 2012; Owens Behun, Manning, & Reid, 2012; Peter & Valkenburg, 2007; 2009). Consequently, marriage and family therapists and mental health counselors are working with clients with issues related to pornography use, and the majority of those clinicians are minimally prepared to do so (Ayres & Haddock, 2009).  Therefore, the first step in preparing counselors to work with clients with issues related to pornography use is to bring awareness of these problems to counselor educators so that they can better prepare future counselors to work with clients with these presenting problems. The presenter will facilitate a discussion revolving around a review recent literature regarding the counseling implications associated with adolescent pornography use. The theme of this conference is connecting to culturally relevant pedagogy and practice. Recent research identifies that the use of pornography prevalent and pervasive in today’s society with various impacts on individuals, couples and families. Therefore, an exploration of how adolescents use pornography and the impact it has on them intrapersonally and interpersonally is a contemporary issue with implications for counselors practicing in today’s technological world. Attendees will gain knowledge of the prevalence of Internet pornography use amongst adolescents and the problem behaviors and attitudes associated with Internet pornography use. Attendees will gain understanding of the progression and evolution of pornographic media over the past forty years. Attendees will gain recommendations for preparing counselors to work with adolescents or individuals who use Internet pornography This presentation is a critical analysis of the literature regarding the counseling implications associated with client pornography use. The presenter will facilitate a discussion around the roles and obligations of counselor educators necessary to prepare future counselors to work with adolescents impacted by their pornography use. Zachary Bloom MA NA                         Sexuality Adolescents Internet
191 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A The Lived Experiences of Men in a Master’s Level Counseling Program The field of counseling has become an increasingly female-concentrated profession. Men represent only 16% of students enrolled in accredited counseling master’s degree programs (CACREP, 2012). Men are, however, critically important to the field of counseling as they diversify the profession and play a key role in providing services to men seeking help with career and work-life balance (Michel, Hall, Hays, & Runyan, 2013; Willyard, 2011). While this gender imbalance is cause for concern, limited research has explored the experiences of men in counseling programs. Counselor educators and supervisors know little about how the broader social context influences male learning and experiences in a counseling program (Wester, 2002).Accordingly, the goals of this roundtable session are a) to provide participants with findings from a phenomenological study that explored the lived experiences of male students in a master’s counseling program and, b) to discuss culturally relevant pedagogy and practices in counselor education that facilitate the development of male students. The discussion will explore the role of gender socialization and identity in the experiences of male students enrolled in a counseling program, the future career plans of male counseling students, as well as recruitment and retention of male students in counselor education programs. The intent of this session, as it relates to the conference theme, is to inform pedagogy that is culturally sensitive to male student needs in counseling programs. /  / 1. Gain knowledge concerning the role of gender identity and intersecting cultural identities on the lived experiences of master’s level male counseling students and their future professional goals. 2. Develop an understanding of effective pedagogical strategies that address the culturally specific needs and challenges of male counseling students. 3. Increase awareness of culturally sensitive recruitment and retention strategies that increase male involvement in the clinical practice of counseling. Men represent only 16% of students enrolled in accredited counseling master’s degree programs (CACREP, 2012). Limited research has explored male experiences in an increasingly female-concentrated profession. Participants will discuss findings from a phenomenological study that explored the lived experiences of male students in a master’s counseling program, and effective pedagogical strategies for counselor educators and supervisors that address culturally specific needs of male students. Stephanie Crockett PhD Dena Elghoroury MA. LLPC, NCC Melanie Popiolek MA, LLPC, NCC Brian Wummel MA, LPC, NCC         Men Counselor education Gender
200 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B The Pedagogy of Case Conceptualization: A New Model Counselor Educators are always striving to facilitate their students’ understanding of the importance of effective case conceptualization in treatment. Effective case conceptualization entails thinking integratively, developing and testing hypotheses, and planning treatment based on those hypotheses. Because of the complexity of the process, effective methods of teaching case conceptualization are critical to student mastery of this important skill.  / The presenters have developed a new atheoretical case conceptualization model (T/C Model) as part of a textbook they have co-authored for Sage Publication’s series Counseling and Professional Identity. Although there is some research on models of case conceptualization, much of the literature is theory-specific and not widely applicable to the way in which counselors will eventually practice. Students often confuse theoretical orientation with case conceptualization, using a single theoretical lens to make sense of a client’s problem, thus narrowing their ability to develop a comprehensive understanding.  In contrast, the model presented here is atheoretical, allowing students to incorporate constructs from various theoretical paradigms.  / The T/C Model is comprehensive, but easy to use and to teach, with a visual diagram of the model provided which helps students to understand and apply the model to diverse clients. Counselor educators can help students apply the model to case examples as guided practice, deepening student’s understanding of the importance of context. Attendees will have a thorough understanding of the T/C Model and the opportunity to practice methods of teaching the model to students which will ensure their mastery of the case conceptualization process.  / 1. To understand an innovative new atheoretical case conceptualization model (T/C Model) 2. Acquire new methods of teaching case conceptualization using the T/C Model 3. Practice application of T/C Model to case examples as a method of guided practice for student learning Effective case conceptualization entails thinking integratively, developing and testing hypotheses, and employing evidence based interventions. Effective methods of teaching case conceptualization are critical to student mastery of this important skill. The presenters have developed a new atheoretical case conceptualization model (T/C Model) as part of a textbook they have co-authored for Sage Publication’s series Counseling and Professional Identity. Attendees will gain an understanding of the Model and have an opportunity to practice methods of teaching the model. Matthew Snyder Ph.D. Lynn Zubernis Ph.D.                     Case Conceptualization Pedagogy  
195 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A Teaching and Supervising the Second-Career Counselor Students often come to the counseling profession from another career. Many graduate programs target this demographic by offering classes geared to the working adult’s schedule, including online, weekend, and evening program formats. These efforts have led to an increase in “second career” counseling students, and this trend shows no sign of slowing. However, these students have distinct strengths and challenges which set them apart from traditional students. So, although their numbers are increasing, the programs which attract second career counseling students may not be fully equipped to address their training needs. As a result, programs which are geared toward traditionally-aged students can often marginalize older, nontraditional students. This roundtable session will discuss some of the traits of second career counselors, including risk and protective factors, and will offer developmental and constructivist models for training second career counselors as they embark on their counseling careers. Participants will be invited to discuss their experiences with teaching and supervising second career counseling students, with the intent of building a counselor education and supervision model that responds to the specific training needs of this nontraditional group of learners. Participants will learn about the distinct training needs of second career counseling students. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss their experiences teaching and supervising older nontraditional counseling students. Participants will be invited to provide input into a training model which will answer these students’ unique needs. “Second career” counselors – those who come to the counseling profession from another career – bring unique strengths and challenges. This roundtable session will discuss traits of second career counselors, and will offer ideas for training these students. Participants will discuss their experiences teaching and supervising second career counseling students, with the goal of building an education and supervision model that responds to the training needs of this nontraditional group of learners. Pamela Elmore MA                           nontraditional older  
192 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A Pedagogical Practices to Develop Counselor Personhood What is involved in the development of counselor personhood, and how do we encourage this critical area of development as counselor educators?  The presenters will discuss initial findings of their qualitative research study on pedagogical practices that promote the development of personhood for counselors in training. / Developing the personhood of the counselor refers to humanistically-oriented counselor education practices that "focus on the student's self-understanding and the use of self in the process of learning and potentiating positive development in others" (Hoshmond, 2004, p. 83). Carl Rogers (1992) argued that counselors should be truly themselves with clients – congruent, genuine, and integrated.  Doing this serves as a model for clients, and creates the opportunity for relational learning in the counseling relationship that clients can transfer to other relationships (Knight, 2012).  As such, counselor educators are constantly seeking new ways to assist counselors in training to connect with their genuine selves, trust their intuitive knowledge, and offer these important aspects to clients in an authentic encounter. / In this roundtable session, the presenters will share findings of their qualitative research on pedagogical strategies that promote counselor personhood. Delivery methods will include a brief didactic presentation on the study findings, followed by a discussion of pedagogical practices to promote counselor development of personhood. The presentation aligns with the conference theme by highlighting effective pedagogical strategies for counselor preparation. • Identify pedagogical interventions that promote counselor development of personhood in training programs and in clinical supervision • Recognize pedagogical techniques that are useful for developing counselors’ sense of personhood • Share and create strategies for assisting counselors in training to become more self-aware and utilize this knowledge in their counseling practical experiences (peer-to-peer sessions, practicum, and internship) Presenters will share findings of their qualitative research on pedagogical strategies that promote counselor personhood. Through knowledge of the key components that students report as vital to their development of personhood, counselor educators and supervisors may develop strategies to enhance those growth experiences. Participants will share and discuss pedagogical practices that support counselor development of personhood, successes, challenges, and areas that stimulate curiosity. Laura Boyd Farmer PhD Corrine Sackett PhD                     counselor personhood humanistic pedagogy use of self
193 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A Internship Gardening: Planting, Watering, and Pulling Weeds to Grow Interns and Internship Sites. Creating and maintaining transformative internship experiences is an ongoing challenge for counselor educators.  This 50-minute roundtable session will provide a forum to discuss strategies for developing new internship sites and creative ways for building and maintaining relationships with site supervisors.  The discussion will focus on effective problem-solving and conflict resolution with site supervisors, procedures for matching interns with sites, and issues related to preparing students to effectively manage the environmental variables of the internship site and expectations of their site supervisor.  Multicultural variables that influence the working alliance between interns and site supervisors will also be discussed. Counselor educators will learn strategies for finding, building, and maintaining internship sites. Counselor educators will have the opportunity to discuss strategies for preventing and managing conflict and preparing students to effectively manage the environmental variables of the internship site and expectations of the site supervisor. Counselor educators will identify and address multicultural variables that influence the working alliance between interns and site supervisors. A roundtable discussion of strategies for developing new internships and building strong relationships with site supervisors.  The dialogue will also focus on preventing and managing common internship problems while considering the multicultural variables that influence the working alliance between interns and site supervisors. Lori Copeland Ph.D. Gail Roaten Ph.D. Sherry Rosenblad Ph.D. John Eric Swenson Ph.D.         Internships Internship Supervision Multicultural Awareness
196 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A Making headways: Culturally Sensitive Practices with Refugees Refugees can enter into the United States Public School System with mental health concerns stemming from the acculturation process (Cumming and Visser, 2009; Fazel, Doll, & Stein, 2009).  Acculturation stress can come about when refugee children are attempting to balance both native and host cultural values (Cervantes, Padilla, Napper & Goldbach, 2013). . Culturally sensitive groups can offer a valuable means in assisting refugee children in their acculturation process (Olujic, Rano, & Badwan, 2012) and school counselors are in a unique position to facilitate these groups. Schools in the US offer a unique environment of continuous and consistent exposure to the mainstream culture (Chiumento et al.; Cumming & Visser). With this exposure comes, imposed acculturation and often acculturation stress (Phillimore, 2011). Authors in this presentation formulate the argument that culturally sensitive groups can provide an opportunity for refugees to explore their own their acculturation process, providing a safe place for exploration and normalization (Olujic et al.).  To facilitate successful culturally relevant groups, school counselors must utilize culturally relevant pedagogical practices, student’s natural strengths, and acculturation resources (Olujic et al.). / Program Goals will include the following:  / • To provide culturally relevant pedagogical practices for counselor educators,  / • Explore the role culturally sensitive practices when working with refugees,  / • Provide examples of current practices with refugees through cultural groups / • Explore the role of acculturation and culturally sensitive ways of promoting integration to their communities. /   This program will be delivered through a combination of active group participation, utilizing handouts and PowerPoint presentation. This program will address the role of culturally sensitive practices and how to transfer them into clinical practice. Counselors Educators will be able to utilize these strategies, to inform training and pedagogical approaches to counselors-in-training.  /  / References: /  / Cervantes, R. C., Padilla, A. M., Napper, L. E., & Goldbach, J. T. (2013). Acculturation-Related Stress and Mental Health Outcomes Among Three Generations of Hispanic Adolescents. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 35(4), 451-468. / Chiumento, A., Nelki, J., Dutton, C., & Hughes, G. (2011). School-based mental health service for refugee and asylum seeking children: Multi-agency working, lessons for good practice. Journal of Public Mental Health, 10(3), 164-177. / Cumming, S. and Visser, J. (2009). Using art with vulnerable children. Support for  Learning, 24 (1), 151–158.  / Fazel, M., Doll, H. & Stein, A.A. (2009). A school-based mental health intervention for refugee children: an exploratory study. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry,  14(2), 297-309.  / Gunilla, J.B., Christian, B., Gunilla S., & Gustafsson, P. A., (2013). Brief Family  Therapy for  Refugee Children. The Family Journal, 21(3), 272-278.  / Hurley, J. J., Saini, S., Warren, R. A., & Carberry, A. J., (2013). Use of the Pyramid Model for supporting preschool refugees, Early Child Development and Care, 183(1), 75-91.  / Olujic, M. B., Rano, R., & Badwan, O. H. (2012). RESPECT Guide for School Social Workers, Counselors, Psychologists, and Educators. Denver, Colorado: Jewish Family Service of Colorado. / Phillimore, J. (2011). Refugees, acculturation strategies, stress and integration. Journal of Social Policy, 40(1), 575-593. / UNHCR. (2011). Total population of concern to UNHCR. Retrieved from  http://www.unhcr.org/news/NEWS/467785bb4.html / U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). (2010, 15 June). 2009: Global levels and trends in industrialized counties: Refugees, asylum-seekers, returnees, internally displaced and stateless persons. Retrieved from http://www.unhcr.org/4c11f0be9.pdf   /  / Assist attendee’s in observing their own cognitions, viewpoints, considerations, and acculturative understandings towards working with refugees Acknowledge theories of multicultural counseling and identity development, discuss group, individual, and community strategies for working and advocating for refugee youth in the schools, Assist attendees in the identification of their role in developing cultural self-awareness, and examine ways in eliminating biases, prejudices, and processes of intentional and unintentional oppression and discrimination when working with refugees. At the conclusion of the Second World War close to 42 million refugees, almost half of whom identified as children, were displaced from their native homes (U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, 2010). They experienced extreme discrimination, maltreatment, and oppression because of their many cultural identifications and characteristics (UNHCR, 2011). As refugee children enter into the United States, they are required by law to attend public schools. Refugees often enter into these schools with multifaceted physical and psychological needs following traumatic experiences (Cumming and Visser, 2009; Fazel et al., 2009). With this in mind, conclusions made between these studies show the importance of utilizing school-based interventions due to the familiar and consistent environment it can provide (Chiumento et al., 2011; Cumming & Visser; Fazel et al.; Hurley et al., 2013). Schools can provide consistency, exposure to the mainstream culture, easy access to community resources, support, and a sense of safety to refugees within the shielding setting (Chiumento et al; Cumming & Visser). /  Immersion in safe school environments can greatly assist in the acculturation of refugee children (Chiumento et al.); school counselors can be instrumental in this process. The school environment, with its many student populations closely contained within the school boundaries on a daily basis, provides the perfect setting for school counselors to pursue this direction. School counselors are trained to work with culturally diverse populations; however, graduate level training traditionally has not focused on cross collaboration between these two fields. The complex challenges and needs of refugee children provide an optimal opportunity for school counselors to professionally collaborate. The varying expertise of school counselor can offer a diversified lense from which to conceptualize and provide culturally competent evidence based interventions for this population.  /   Cultural adjustment groups provide a beneficial opportunity for school counselors to collectively assist refugees entering the new school environment. These particular groups are designed with the purpose of exploring the acculturation process, while utilizing the advantages of group dynamics. These groups normally are comprised of 12 to 15 refugees, meet 8 to 12 weeks, and run for roughly 40 to 45 minutes (Olujic, Rano, & Badwan, 2012). According to Olujic et al., the intent of this type of group is to offer a safe and secure environment within the schools where refugees can explore feelings, trepidations, opinions, and reflections surrounding their own migration and acculturation experiences in order to combat personal feelings of seclusion. It is important to note that cultural adjustment groups are centered on broad premises of pre-and-post migration, acculturation, and relocation experiences (Olujic et al.). When composing these groups, it is important for school counselors to be aware of specific background particulars on each refugee, which include the following: language proficiency, amount of time spent in the United States, mental health concerns, academic concerns, and any behavioral problems within the school (Olujic et al.). Acculturation groups as an intervention are designed to meet the current mental health needs of refugees while serving as a preventative measure against potential future concerns these students may face.  /  / References: / Cervantes, R. C., Padilla, A. M., Napper, L. E., & Goldbach, J. T. (2013). Acculturation-Related Stress and Mental Health Outcomes Among Three Generations of Hispanic Adolescents. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 35(4), 451-468. / Chiumento, A., Nelki, J., Dutton, C., & Hughes, G. (2011). School-based mental health service for refugee and asylum seeking children: Multi-agency working, lessons for good practice. Journal of Public Mental Health, 10(3), 164-177. / Cumming, S. and Visser, J. (2009). Using art with vulnerable children. Support for  Learning, 24 (1), 151–158.  / Fazel, M., Doll, H. & Stein, A.A. (2009). A school-based mental health intervention for refugee children: an exploratory study. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry,  14(2), 297-309.  / Gunilla, J.B., Christian, B., Gunilla S., & Gustafsson, P. A., (2013). Brief Family  Therapy for  Refugee Children. The Family Journal, 21(3), 272-278.  / Hurley, J. J., Saini, S., Warren, R. A., & Carberry, A. J., (2013). Use of the Pyramid Model for supporting preschool refugees, Early Child Development and Care, 183(1), 75-91.  / Olujic, M. B., Rano, R., & Badwan, O. H. (2012). RESPECT Guide for School Social Workers, Counselors, Psychologists, and Educators. Denver, Colorado: Jewish Family Service of Colorado. / Phillimore, J. (2011). Refugees, acculturation strategies, stress and integration. Journal of Social Policy, 40(1), 575-593. / UNHCR. (2011). Total population of concern to UNHCR. Retrieved from  http://www.unhcr.org/news/NEWS/467785bb4.html / U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). (2010, 15 June). 2009: Global levels and trends in industrialized counties: Refugees, asylum-seekers, returnees, internally displaced and stateless persons. Retrieved from http://www.unhcr.org/4c11f0be9.pdf   / Thomas Killian M.Ed. Betty Cardona Ph.D.                     Acculturation Cultural Adjustment Refugees
201 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B The Last Chapter: a roundtable discussion examining barriers and best practices in facilitating multicultural awareness in CES programs. Standards exist for creating learning experiences in CES programs related to multicultural issues, and it is widely accepted that this is a pivotal growth area for students. However, this topic is often limited to one class or relegated to the last chapter of text. This is problematic as it proliferates a system of oppression in pedagogy – that multicultural issues are less important and thus not worthy of further exploration.  This minimizes the significance of this core competency and potentially limits student’s growth as social justice advocates. The presenters will specifically address intersectionality as related to how counselor educators and supervisors may approach it from a cultural sensitive framework. The delivery method for this discussion will be through visuals related to the information presented, thoughtfully facilitated discussion, and via handouts highlighting the issues presented. Goals of this roundtable are: 1.) Present literature supported information on the impact of this disparity, 2.) to give space for sharing of experiences, 3.) identifying barriers to change in our educational systems, 4.) highlighting of what works. name barriers to facilitation of multicultural awareness in CES programs identify best practices, helpful experiences as shared by attendees describe impact of limited multicultural awareness in students Standards exist for creating learning experiences in CES programs related to multicultural issues, and it is widely accepted that this is a pivotal growth area for students. However, this topic is often limited to one class or relegated to the last chapter of text. This is problematic as it proliferates a system of oppression in pedagogy – that multicultural issues are less important and thus not worthy of further exploration.  This minimizes the significance of this core competency and potentially limits student’s growth as social justice advocates. Connie Couch Master of Education Stephanie Pergantis Master of Science Betty Cardona PhD in CES               pedagogy multicultural counselor development
202 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Fostering counseling students' professional growth through experiential learning and community engagement The presenter will share outcomes from a pilot program where clinical mental health and school counseling students facilitated semester-long groups in a public school district. Additionally, the presenter also examines the critical issues in planning, implementing and advancing a partnership between a university and a school district while also seeking audience input. /  / In order to best meet the needs of an urban, culturally diverse community struggling with youth aggression, counselor educators and students partnered with school educators to deliver a 14-week intervention focused on emotional regulation, conflict resolution, and empathy building. The interactive presentation shares the results of a study that sought to uncover the essence of the student facilitators’ experiences planning and implementing these groups. Using Moustaka’s transcendental phenomenological model as a framework for data analysis, the results revealed students’ experiences and the impact they had on their cultural competence and identity as counselors. /  / Community engagement and cultural competence is integral to the role of the professional counselor. In addition to empowering individuals by identifying strengths and resources, and recognizing social, political, economic, and cultural factors that impact them on the microlevel, counselors are also obligated to work with and on behalf of clients and students at the community level (Toporek, Lewis, and Crethar, 2009). This project provided opportunities for students to model civic behaviors, foster inclusive attitudes, and develop counseling skills. By promoting early and constant opportunities for field experiences, counseling students’ skills and perspectives develop in a manner which sustains positive developmental trajectories and result in important community outcomes (Fisher et al., 2012).  / Explore critical issues in planning, implementing, and advancing a university and community partnership Understand how students’ civic learning outcomes, cultural competence, and social justice mindset can impact the effectiveness of a counseling intervention in an urban setting Recognize benefits and challenges associated with facilitating additional field experiences beyond practicum and internship This presentation explores outcomes of a pilot program stemming from a collaborative partnership between a counselor education program and a public school district. School and clinical mental health counseling students facilitated child and adolescent counseling groups that focused on emotional regulation, conflict resolution, and empathy building. Using a phenomenological approach, this intervention-based research project investigated the student facilitators’ experiences planning, implementing, and evaluating these groups. Marte Ostvik-de Wilde PhD                           Community Engagement Group Counseling Experiential Learning
203 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Teaching Self-Care Techniques to Counselors in Training through Mindfulness in Supervision The majority of counseling training programs emphasize the need for counselors in training to learn self-care strategies to prevent burnout; however, the demands of the curricula and training often leaves little room for actually teaching these strategies (Chambers, 2006). Although it is not frequently taught, both Baker (2003) and Weiss (2004) have found that when counseling students learn self-care techniques it can benefit them long term and positively affect their educational and training experiences.  This interactive presentation will guide counselor educators through a practical approach to teach and implement the self-care strategy of mindfulness through individual supervision.  /  / Presenters will share their own experience with teaching self-care to counseling practicum students through using mindfulness in individual supervision. Reflections and perceptions from the counseling trainees will also be shared regarding this implementation. Additionally, participants will have the opportunity to share their own approaches or ideas for teaching self-care to counselors in training through an interactive discussion. The program goals are for attendees to learn a practical approach to teaching self-care through mindfulness in supervision as well as have the opportunity to gather additional ideas from presentation participants.  /  / This presentation directly relates to the conference theme because by learning ways to teach self-care strategies to counselors in training, counselor educators can incorporate these ideas into their own teaching, supervision, and practice.  / Participants will understand the importance for counselor educators to teach self-care techniques to counselors in training. Participants will learn a practical approach to teach and implement the self-care strategy of mindfulness through individual supervision. Participants will gather additional ideas for how to implement the teaching of self-care from presentation participants. The majority of counseling training programs emphasize the need for counselors in training to learn self-care strategies; however, the demands of the curricula and training often leaves little room for teaching these strategies (Chambers, 2006). This interactive presentation will guide counselor educators through a practical approach to teach and implement the self-care strategy of mindfulness through individual supervision. Additionally, participants will have the opportunity to share their own approaches or ideas for teaching self-care to counselors in training. Anna Lora Taylor M.S. Emily Brown M.A. Evan Burns M.S.               self-care pedagogy supervision
cancelled? 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A The experience of Black and Latino males in alternative educational settings Previous studies have shown a disproportion in school discipline between Black and Latino male students when compared to white students (Walk & Losen, 2003). Factors such as race, socioeconomic status (SES), cultural mismatch, and racial stereotyping have been discussed as possible mechanisms related to this disproportion. Even when race is independent of SES Black males have a higher suspension rate than their counterparts. Black children are thought to exhibit behavioral styles that are incongruent from mainstream society that places them at a greater risk for getting in trouble in school settings. The idea that cultural mismatch play a role in this disproportion is also worth noting. Teachers are mostly white female. This cultural mismatch may lead students to being misunderstood due to an unfamiliarity with their culture. Many US states offer students an opportunity to participate in alternative educational settings when they have been expelled from “regular” school settings. The purpose of this presentation will be to discuss the benefits and/or consequences of Black and Latino males receiving their education in alternative settings. Educators of all kinds are invited to participate in this open dialogue. Case examples and an open discussion will be used to engage the audience on this topic. This presentation supports this year’s theme by discussing culturally relevant practices for working with an at risk population. • To understand our role as educators to teach culturally relevant practices to use when working with Black and Latino males who are at a greater risk for discipline in school settings. • To learn ways to promote advocacy on behalf of students who are often culturally misunderstood. • To learn innovative strategies for working with this at risk population. Previous studies have shown a disproportion in school discipline between Black and Latino male students when compared to white students. Factors such as race, socioeconomic status (SES), cultural mismatch, and racial stereotyping have been discussed as possible mechanisms related to this disproportion. The purpose of this presentation will be to discuss the benefits and/or consequences of Black and Latino males receiving their education in alternative setting after being expelled from traditional school settings. Mashone Parker-Wright PhD                           Education Black Latino
204 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Cultivating Presence: A Discussion of Mindfulness Practices in Counselor Education The intentional practice of mindfulness can decrease anxiety in the classroom, foster an atmosphere of respect, increase awareness of thoughts and feelings, improve the ability to be purposefully present, and enhance overall wellness (Napora, 2011; Hyland, 2009; Ritchart and Perkins, 2000; Slavik, 2014).  Integrating mindfulness practices into counselor education as a pedagogy practice can assist students with cultivating cognitive flexibility and promotes greater self-awareness, thus also teaching counseling students skills essential for working in the field of professional counseling (Bush, 2011; Grace 2011).   /  / In this interactive session, the presenters will discuss ways to integrate mindfulness practices into counselor education pedagogy. Delivery methods will include a brief didactic presentation followed by discussion about ideas and techniques for using mindfulness in counselor education courses and clinical experiences.  / Discuss literature that supports mindfulness practices in counselor education Describe benefits of integrating mindfulness practices for counselors-in-training. Identify ways to use mindfulness in counselor education courses Utilizing mindfulness practices is a growing interest among counselor educators.  Integrating mindfulness practices into counselor education as a pedagogy practice assists students in learning skills essential for working in the field of professional counseling. The presenters in this round table discussion will discuss literature that supports mindfulness practices in counselor education, describe benefits of mindfulness, and identify ways to use mindfulness in counselor education courses. Jenna Haynes Masters of Arts in Education Kevin Doyle Masters of Arts                     Mindfulness Counselor Wellness Mindful Pedagogy
205 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Implications for School Counselors: Working with Undocumented Students With recent discussions on immigration reform, working with undocumented students is a culturally relevant topic to counselor education and school counseling.  The recent approval of deferred action has led to an increased need for education on the impact it has on students and their families. School counselors should have a better understanding of the challenges undocumented students face, and the current opportunities being afforded to them. The presenter will define Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA). Counselors will learn approaches to identifying undocumented students.  Strategies will also be given on creating a safe place for the student and his or her family, as well as keeping the student motivated academically. Furthermore participants will leave with a better understanding of options that may or may not be available to undocumented students, (FAFSA, In-state vs. out of state tuition) and necessary resources to provide support. Lastly, we will discuss our role as advocates for undocumented students and how we can be more involved. Define Daca and DAPA Strategies for working with undocumented students Promoting Advocacy School counselors should have a better understanding of the challenges undocumented students face, and the current opportunities being afforded to them. The presenter will define Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA). Counselors will learn approaches to identifying undocumented students.  Strategies will also be given on creating a safe place for the student and his or her family, as well as keeping the student motivated academically. Furthermore participants will leave with a better understanding of options that may or may not be available to undocumented students, (FAFSA, In-state vs. out of state tuition) and necessary resources to provide support. Lastly, we will discuss our role as advocates for undocumented students and how we can be more involved. Shekila Melchior M.S. School Counseling                           Undocumented Students School counselors and advocacy  
206 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Culturally Competent On-line Counselor Supervision Counselor training and supervision is constantly growing in on-line environments domestically and internationally. Therefore, counseling students, supervisors, and instructors need to be attuned to current ethical standards and best practices specific to online supervision. Due to the progression in technology, clinical supervisors are now dealing with much broader cultural issues, such as geographical area, customs, and language.  Therefore, it is imperative to prepare counselor educators who have the competencies and dispositions to effectively supervise international students and students outside their local region or community in the on-line environment.  / This presentation will be illustrated with examples from clinical supervisors’ experiences who currently provide continuous clinical supervision in the United States and internationally via translators.  We will also be reviewing the growing body of literature that is being produced around online supervision.  Main points of the presentation will be illustrated through PowerPoint slides and interactive discussion.  This presentation directly relates to culturally relevant pedagogy and practice in on-line clinical supervision. / 1. Participants will learn main ethical standards and best practices for the on-line clinical supervision. 2. Participants will become aware of the barriers and strategies to address culturally-competent on-line supervision. 3. Participants will learn tips in being aware and respecting least acknowledged cultural competence factors (e.g., language barriers, cultural customs, time-management, etc.). This presentation will review current ethical standards and best practices for on-line clinical supervision. Focus will be given to the barriers within the culturally-competent interactions in the on-line environment and the strategies for addressing them.  Then, specific attention will be given to those factors that are least recognized in the main stream counselor education discussions.  Special consideration will be given to international interactions and work with translators. Christine Baker Masters Andreas Bienert Masters Olya Zaporozhets PhD Jacqueline Smith PhD         Supervision Online Cross-Cultural
207 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Evaluating Multicultural Awareness through Cultural Exposure: Tools for Effective Pedagogy Self-awareness, curiosity, a solid knowledge base, and openness to learning are among the defining characteristics of a capable counselor educator. Maintaining these qualities through cultural exposure and immersion are an important component of increasing multicultural competence. The purpose of this roundtable discussion is for participants to engage in thoughtful discussion on the process of developing cultural awareness. Reflecting on privilege and multicultural awareness will challenge participants to evaluate how these experiences have influenced their roles as counselor educators.  /  / Program goals: (1) consider areas of strength and needed improvement for increasing multicultural counseling competency for counselors-in-training and (2) discuss supportive approaches for encouraging self-exploration and openness for beginning and experienced counselor educators.  /  / Delivery method: During this roundtable discussion, the presenter will engage participants through dialogue and reflection about effective teaching practices for the process of developing and evaluating multicultural awareness. The presenter will encourage the creation of a safe space for participants to discuss, reflect, and collaborate openly. /  / This program connects with the conference theme through the exploration of effective, culturally relevant teaching and practice for increasing multicultural awareness for counselor educators and / counselors-in-training. Evaluate useful pedagogic tools for increasing multicultural competence among counselors-in-training. Explore areas of needed improvement for teaching counselors-in-training to increase cultural and self-awareness. Consider strategies to strengthen multicultural awareness practices for counselor educators. Culturally relevant teaching and practice is an exciting part of counselor education. Cultural exposure is one way to increase multicultural awareness and strengthen one’s counselor educator identity. During this session, the presenter will engage participants in thoughtful discussion on the process of developing cultural awareness. The individual experiences of the roundtable participants will be explored and specific strategies for using those experiences as pedagogic tools will be outlined. Emily Petkus M.A.                           Multicultural Awareness Development
198 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A Continuing conversations on race and power: Mentoring future counselor educators of Color in working with White students and supervisees As increased racial diversity in Counselor Education and Supervision programs shifts the landscape in higher education, increasing numbers of students of Color serve in positions of power with White counselors-in-training. This dynamic can present challenges and opportunities for growth with future counselor educators and counselors-in-training. Research (Chang & Hays, 2004; Leong & Wagner, 1994) has largely focused on the experiences of White counselor educators and supervisors with students of Color, and only minimally addressed the reverse and impact on professional development. This program will continue the conversation of race and power in counselor education, focusing on multicultural competency, racial identity development, and professional development. The program will integrate the lived experiences of a Latino Doctoral student and African-American Assistant Professor in exploring ways counselor educators can mentor and support future counselor educators of Color. This program will include discussion of racial identity, power dynamics in counselor education and supervision, mentoring and professional development.  / The program goals include identifying narrative themes in the lived experiences of doctoral students of Color, facilitating discussion of race and power, and providing strategies for counselor educators and doctoral students of Color to address these issues in supervision and the classroom.  / The delivery method will include discussion, classroom and supervision vignettes, and handouts.  / The program connects to the theme by incorporating pedagogical strategies and mentoring to address race and power in the professional development of counselor educators and counselors-in-training. Identify issues of race and power in CES Identify strategies to mentor and support CES students of Color Review racial identity and counselor development Using the lived experiences of a Latino Doctoral student and an African-American Assistant Professor, this program focuses on how counselor educators can mentor and support the professional identity development of future counselor educators of Color as they navigate issues of race and power. Program attendees will explore dynamics of race and power in counselor education and supervision, discuss racial identity, and identify strategies for mentoring and professional development for future counselor educators of Color and White counselors-in-training. Adrienne Erby PhD Julio Orozco MA                     student race power
194 1 12:00-12:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A Embedding and Activating a Multicultural Lens in Your Counseling Courses Multiculturalism is a cornerstone of the Counseling profession and there is growing urgency to increase students’ competencies in this area.  This suggests that counseling programs should showcase their endorsement of multiculturalism through curricula that rigorously promote this value. However, at the moment there is great inconsistency in how instructors embed and activate a multicultural lens in typical master-level courses.  The continuum is troubling. On the one hand, there are courses with a distinctive multicultural lens that advance appreciation for diverse worldviews, cultural-proficiency skills and social justice advocacy. Typically, Counseling programs require students to take only one such course. On the other end, in many other courses in which a multicultural lens is absent. In such courses, students, especially from non-majority backgrounds, can feel marginalized.  In the spirit of promoting leadership of culturally-relevant pedagogy and practice, our roundtable aims to help instructors to audit and transform their courses to showcase the emphasis on multiculturalism as a key professional competency and also a life skill in the global marketplace.  We include perspectives of faculty and students to explore: 1) a template for embedding and using a multicultural lens in any course; 2) a checklist to audit the level of multicultural content and processes in the course syllabus; 3) strategies to ensure that readings and other materials are culturally-informed and culturally-responsive; and 4) methods to redesign activities and assignments to heighten students’ application of multicultural competencies. We will provide practical examples and also discuss benefits and challenges in integrating these principles. Participants will learn how to audit courses for level multicultural content and processes Participants will learn strategies to ensure that readings and other materials and culturally-informed and culturally-responsive Participants will learn methods to redesign course activities and assignments to help students to apply multicultural skills Multiculturalism is a cornerstone of Counseling and there is urgency to increase students’ competencies in this area.  Counseling programs must endorse culturally-responsive  curricula and we hope to help instructors to embed and activate a multicultural lens in their courses. We provide a template for course design through a multicultural lens; a checklist to audit levels of multicultural content and process; strategies to include culturally-informed readings and other materials and methods to design assignments to prompt students’ application of multicultural competencies. Donna Baptiste Ed.D Paul Pagones M.Ed Shalini Lulla MBA Nona Wilson Ph.D         Culturally-Informed Courses Multiculturalism Curriculum
209 1.5 1:30- 2:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 301 Across Borders:  Challenges impacting Latino/a communities Issues regarding immigration and immigration policy have been debated for countless years.  Although, many arguments can be made regarding immigration policy, what cannot be argued is the need for mental health professionals to address the needs of the immigrant community.  According to Reitmanova and Gustafson (2009), “knowledge about visible minority immigrants’ mental health status and needs will inform policy decisions for building a culturally responsive system that effectively addresses determinants of immigrants’ well-being and reduces their vulnerability to mental illness” (p. 54). This symposia will revolve around the discussion of three different issues related to the Latina/o community:  the impact of border violence on immigrants currently living in the U.S., the effects of border violence on children, and the consequences of deportation on deportees and spouses left behind. Gain an understanding of the potential familial, marital, financial, and psycho-social consequences of deportation and border violence based on findings gathered from two separate qualitative studies. Learn about implications and recommendations for working with immigrants affected by border violence and deportations. Obtain knowledge regarding the impact of immigrant issues (deportations, border violence, adjustment, i.e.) on children. Issues regarding immigration and immigration policy have been debated for countless years.  Although, many arguments can be made regarding immigration policy, what cannot be argued is the need for mental health professionals to address the needs of the immigrant community. This symposia will revolve around the discussion of three different issues related to the Latina/o community:  the impact of border violence on immigrants currently living in the U.S., the effects of border violence on children, and the consequences of deportation on deportees and spouses left behind. Lopez-Salcido Anna Ph.D. Ivelisse Torres-Fernandez Ph.D. Ana Laura James M.A.               Immigration Deportation Border Violence
210 1.5 1:30- 2:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 301 Supervisors’ perceptions of their multicultural training needs for working with English language learning supervisees English language learners constitute the fastest growing segment of the population in the United States (Kanno & Cromley, 2013). In addition, international students are present in close to half of the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (Kok-Mun, 2006). Only a small number of these international students speak English as first language (Chin, 2002). Attending to linguistic differences within supervision may be helpful in responding to the English language learning supervisees’ needs (Bernard & Goodyear, 2013). While the literature has noted that linguistic differences can affect the process and outcome of supervision (Bernard & Goodyear, 2013; Moore, 2012; Nilsson, 2007), the literature has not yet adequately addressed the training of supervisors to successfully work with English language learning students in counselor education and supervision programs. The presentation is designed to present the results from a constructive grounded theory study exploring supervisors’ perceptions of their training needs for working with English language learning supervisees. The symposia will also feature discussion and sharing of insights, strategies, and skills for enhancing supervisors' effectiveness with English language learners. Participants will learn about supervisors’ training needs related to multicultural awareness, knowledge, and skills for effectively supervising English language learning supervisees. Participants will gain insights, strategies, and skills to enhance supervisors' effectiveness with English language learning supervisees. Participants will gain insights on content and process to be infused in supervisors' multicultural training regarding working with English language learning supervisees. In this interactive presentation, participants will learn the results from a constructivist grounded theory study exploring supervisors’ perceptions of their training needs with regards to the multicultural awareness, knowledge, and skills needed to effectively supervise English language learning supervisees as well as discussing strategies, skills, and interventions for enhancing the supervision of English language learning supervisees. Hsin-Ya Tang Ph.D. Tim Grothaus Ph.D.                     ELL Multicultural Supervision  
211 1.5 1:30- 2:50 Thursday, October 8, 2015 301 Cohesion through compassion: Using culturally responsive pedagogy to create welcoming and inclusive learning environments As more and more students from diverse backgrounds populate 21st century classrooms, and efforts mount to identify effective methods to teach these students, the need for pedagogical approaches that are culturally responsive intensifies. Today’s classrooms require educators to create a welcoming and inclusive classroom where students’ experiences, values, and beliefs are appreciated and understood (Gunzenhauser, 2006). Failure to create inclusive environments may cause students to be silent, unwilling to discuss the diversity issues, react emotionally and verbally, or attack other students.  To meet this challenge, educators must employ culturally responsive pedagogy (Freire, 1990; Hooks, 1994; Noddings, 1984) where students’ strengths are identified, nurtured, and utilized to promote cultural sensitivity and learning (Gollnick & Chinn, 2002). Cultural responsive pedagogy is grounded in constructivist views of learning (Gay, 2000; National Research Council, 2000).  Because students are often placed in triads and groups to practice newly acquired counseling skills, students often need to feel appreciated, valued, and supported to be receptive to feedback from peers. Thus, it is critical that educators create a classroom environment of trust and mutual respect so that student practice is not inhibited by fear and judgment. Through culturally responsive pedagogy, attendees will learn practical suggestions for how to apply culturally responsive strategies to promote mutual respect, trust, compassion, and cohesion among students with the aim of building relationships where students feel connected, valued, and appreciated in order to optimize their learning. By creating an inclusive community of learners, educators encourage interaction among students to enrich their educational experience, promote cross cultural understanding, value individual differences, foster mutual respect, develop compassion for others, promote personal growth and awareness, and build cohesion among the students to enhance their sense of community in the classroom. Participants will develop knowledge of culturally responsive pedagogy that promotes an inclusive, nonjudgmental approach to learning. Participants with learn five critical elements necessary for cultural proficiency. Participants will learn specific cultural responsive strategies that will engage students in building collaborative relationships in the classroom. Because students are often placed in triads and groups to practice newly acquired counseling skills, students often need to feel appreciated, valued, supported, and connected to be receptive to feedback from peers. Thus, this program will give attendees practical strategies on how to employ culturally responsive pedagogy to build relationships among students and to create a classroom environment of trust and mutual respect so that student practice is not inhibited by fear and judgment.  / Kimberly Mason Ph.D Jena Henson M.A.                     Culturally responsive pedagogy Cultural Sensitivity Inclusive classrooms
226 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 411 Inclusion of Technology in Supervision: Ethical Pitfalls and Best Practices As the demand for “bigger, faster, stronger, better” technology continues, it is imperative that clinical supervisors and supervisees alike understand appropriate technological options and usage available to improve supervisory practices. Participants will learn about the fast-paced trends of technology-based clinical supervision through a brief history, followed by identifying modern methods of technology that are suitable for supervision. A review of the relevant 2014 ACA Code of Ethics, and best-practices recommendations, will also be provided. Finally, several ethical dilemmas will be examined through discussion about what supervisors and supervisees need to know to stay current among the daily changes, yet ethically and legally sound to protect themselves, their clients, and the profession. Identify for clinical supervisors and supervisees the history of technology in clinical supervision, as well as identify current common technology-based outlets for clinical supervision. Provide application of technology and clinical supervision 2014 ACA Code of Ethics as means to eliminate pitfalls inherent in using technology in supervision. Provide practice in ways to include technology in supervisory meetings appropriately through case conceptualization. Join this dynamic, interactive presentation which will take you through the fast-paced trends of technology-based clinical supervision, learning new ways to incorporate into your own clinical supervision. You will then engage with the presenters and the 2014 ACA Code of Ethics to immediately practice implementation of new knowledge. Allison K. Arnekrans PhD Robin DuFresne MA Leslie Neyland MA Jared S. Rose MA         Technology Supervision Ethics
227 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 412 Educating School Counselors to be Leaders and Advocates for All Students School counselors have many tasks to perform and roles to fulfill in order to support all students.  The American School Counselors Association has designed a model and competencies to train school counselors as leaders and advocates.  However, counselor attitudes and beliefs regarding social justice can impact those skills and how those skills are delivered. Thus, as counselor educators, we are charged with helping to develop these skills and beliefs in order to benefit all students.  Counselors must also have support from their principals.  /  Although research has shown that principals have a positive image of school counselors they may not understand the changes in counselor education over the past decade. With counselor-principal collaboration, there is a better understanding of the role of the counselor and the unique tasks counselors can do to help students succeed.  /  The primary goal of this program is to assist counselor educators in teaching and enhancing leadership and advocacy skills to school counselors in training. Participants will gain insight from data focusing on developing a positive counselor-principal relationship, and learn strategies to promote leadership and advocacy skills in the field. / Through better preparation of counselors-in-training in leadership and advocacy skills, we will promote and encourage equity and social justice, both among our students and throughout our educational system.  / The presentation will consist of didactic presentation, significant attendee participation, and the sharing of pedagogical strategies. / identifying specific strategies to enhance the relationship between counselor and principal identifying strategies for developing comprehensive counseling programs learning strategies for enhancing the training of leadership and advocacy in counselor education programs This workshop for school counselors and counselor educators focuses on enhancing leadership and advocacy skills to support all students. Research from interviewing school principals regarding collaboration for school-wide, comprehensive counseling programs will be shared, and ideas for counselor educators to use to develop and promote advocacy skills and leadership roles in novice school counselors will be discussed. Karen Dickinson Ph.D.                           collaboration advocacy leadership
219 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 401 The Comprehensive Counseling Skills Rubric: Grounding an empirically validated outcome based assessment in strong pedagogy Counselor education and supervision programs accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) are required to evaluate student-learning outcomes. Counseling skills, techniques, phases of a counseling session, and sessions of the counseling relationship have proven to be essential areas of competency for counseling trainees (Cormier, Nurius, & Osborn, 2009; Ivey, Ivey, & Zalaquett, 2009; Young, 2012). In the past, the counseling literature has endorsed various empirically validated classification systems used to assess trainee skills and techniques, including counseling competencies (e.g., skills, dispositions, and behaviors) (Swank, Lambie, & Witta, 2012), attending and multicultural skills (Larson, Suzuki, Gillespie, Potenza, Bechtel, & Toulouse, 1992); counselor effectiveness (e.g., establishing a therapeutic relationship and deepening the session) (Erikson & McAuliffe, 2003); and cross cultural counseling competencies (e.g., cultural sensitivity and understand environmental/personal demands placed on client) (LaFromboise, Coleman, & Hernandez, 1991). Whereas a modest amount of empirical research has centered on the creation of scales that measure counselor competencies and multicultural counseling skills, no instruments assess counseling skills and techniques, phases of a counseling session, and sessions of the counseling relationship. Given the importance of these vital areas of proficiency, a Comprehensive Counseling Skills Rubric (CCSR) was created and validated. This program will review the CCSR, the initial psychometric support, and provide attendees with the skills and knowledge to assess counseling trainees with the CCSR. Attendees will review the Comprehensive Counseling Skills Rubric (e.g., the common core counseling skills, phases of a counseling session, and sessions within the counseling relationship). Attendees will review the initial psychometric support for the CCSR Attendees will utilize the Comprehensive Counseling Skills Rubric while watching a digitally recorded counseling session Counselor education programs accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and / Related Educational Programs (CACREP) are required to evaluate student learning outcomes. An aspect of this evaluation includes ensuring trainees can effectively utilize counseling skills, navigate the various phases of a counseling session, and understand the common sessions of the counseling relationship. Given the importance of these vital areas of proficiency, a Comprehensive Counseling Skills Rubric (CCSR) was validated in a complete and psychometrically sounds manner. This presentation offers attendees information regarding the psychometric properties of the CCSR and the knowledge, experience, and pedagogical framework to support the utilization of the CCSR within a CACREP counselor education curriculum.   / Stephen Flynn Ph.D.                           Skills Rubric Supervision
212 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 303 Online Counselor Training: The Balancing Act of Student Needs, Accreditation Requirements, and Institutional Procedures As society depends more and more on the internet for daily needs (i.e., newsfeed, shopping, access to information, etc…), there is also greater demand for virtual educational opportunities. Online counselor training is increasing in popularity due to its accessibility for students. The online counselor training program at Walden University (a suite of 5 programs; three of which are CACREP accredited) is in its 10th year of existence. In these ten years, we have learned how to deliver quality counselor education within the parameters of a virtual environment.  /  / Counselor training in the online world encompasses more than excellent pedagogical style and solid learning resources. In fact, the behind-the-scenes operational functioning of virtual learning environment has great responsibility for the product that is output. The operational team for the School of Counseling includes the Senior Director for Accreditation and Academic Operations, the Field Experience Director, the Assessment Director, the Residency Coordinator, Student Development Coordinator, the Academic Integrity Coordinator, and the Skills Coordinator.  This team works with Program Directors,  Program Coordinators, and core faculty to support program functioning. Because team members have also served as core faculty in the program, they are familiar with the needs of faculty and students, as well as the needs of the university.  /  / The goal of this educational session is to provide a discussion of how to respond to the current demand for online learning and prepare students for the field of counseling within the parameters of a dynamic virtual environment that promotes .rigorous student development and overall program effectiveness. / • Understand the unique pedagogical and administrative challenges and opportunities experienced by online counselor education specializations accredited by CACREP Identify strategies for adhering to CACREP standards in an virtual counselor training program • Distinguish between learning environment, professional counseling identity, professional practice, and program evaluation , needs for online and land-based counselor education institutions • Analyze innovative and resourceful  infrastructure for quality delivery of online CACREP specializations  that maximize  national and international student needs while responding to institutional and accreditation procedures Counselor training in the online world encompasses more than excellent pedagogical style and solid learning resources. The behind-the-scenes operational functioning of a virtual learning environment has great responsibility for the product it yields. The goal of this session is to provide a discussion of how to respond to the current demand for online learning and prepare students for the field of counseling within the parameters of a virtual environment. Presenters  will include key members of the operations team for a CACREP accredited online program in its 10th year of operation. Robyn Trippany Ed.D. Kelly Coker PhD Earl Grey PhD Kristi Cannon PhD Tiffany Rush-Wilson PhD Jason King, PhD. Coordinator, Student Development. Walden University / Lori Milo, PhD. Coordinator, Academic Integrity. Walden University Online Accreditation Operations
213 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 304 Upgrading Pedagogy! Incorporating Web 2.0 Tools into F2F and Online Courses to Facilitate Active Learning. BYOD. Today’s students are not only comfortable using technology; they are considered “digital natives.” From tablets and smart phones to social media sites and YouTube channels, the millennial generation is no stranger to the developing trends in technology.  / In response to changes in student culture, current educational practices now include the integration of technology in the academic classroom. Web 2.0 tools, can be utilized to create active learning environments wherein students are held more responsible for engaging and participating in their own learning process, thus creating higher level learning The question becomes how to integrate technology into counselor education classrooms while maintaining the unique humanistic quality of the counseling profession. This workshop teaches participants how to manage this task.  / This workshop is designed to address the conference theme “Culturally Relevant Pedagogy Practices.” Goals include introducing eight, free, Web 2.0 tools that can be utilized in F2F, online, or hybrid courses. Examples of how to use these tools to create active learning environments, flip the classroom, enriching discussions and modernizing traditional assignments will be shared. In addition, presenters will explain some pitfalls of using technology in the classroom including managing crashed sites, confronting student resistance, maintaining quality of work, changing grading rubrics, and overall course policies. Finally, presenters will share sample syllabi and assignments. / BYOD! Participants will learn by doing! Interactive links to Web 2.0 applications will be integrated into the presentation. Presenters will share samples of student work created utilizing the various web tools.  / Understand how Web 2.0 tools can be utilized to flip the classroom and create active learning environments, including how to modernize current assignments with Web 2.0 tools. Understand how Web 2.0 tools can be incorporated into F2F, online, or hybrid courses, including beginning the process of how technology can enhance in class and online teaching pedagogy. Learn how to update syllabi to include the use of technology as well as precautions when using technology. BYOD! Whether teaching online, F2F, or hybrid courses, Web 2.0 tools are a great way to engage students in higher levels of thinking. These tools not only engage today’s technology savvy student, they create active learning environments and the opportunity to flip classrooms to further engage students in the learning process. Come learn how to use Web 2.0 tools to modernize courses as well as assignments, how to update syllabi to reflect the use of technology, and about the precautions of using technology in the classroom. Participants will leave with a comprehensive list of free Web 2.0 tools and samples of syllabi and assignments! Kelly Kozlowski PhD Courtney Holmes PhD                     Technology Teaching Pedagogy
214 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 305 Multicultural Counselor Education:  Counseling Clients with Spiritually Transformative Experiences Counseling clients who present with spiritually transformative experiences can be a challenge for any counselor, especially a beginning counselor.  These extraordinary experiences, also called transpersonal experiences, involve transcendence of the usual personal limits of time, space, and/or identity, and they hold the potential for spiritual development and/or transformation.  Studies show clients often have negative experiences when disclosing their transpersonal experiences to mental health professionals.  Furthermore, although such experiences may be disparaged in some Western cultures, transpersonal experiences are valued in many non-Western cultures.  Counselors who dismiss or diagnose such experiences do so without empirical basis and risk being culturally insensitive and therapeutically harmful.  Additionally, the client loses a potentially important opportunity for growth. The presenters will discuss how to use Holden’s near-death experiences model for responding therapeutically when counseling clients present with a variety of transpersonal experiences.  The presenters will discuss the importance of including transpersonal training in counselor education and supervision to ensure counselors are able to meet the needs of clients with transpersonal experiences. They will offer materials and demonstrate how to include this training in a multicultural counseling or counseling supervision class. Define spiritually transformative experiences. Describe Holden’s training model. Explain how to implement Holden’s model in counselor education and supervision. Studies show clients often have negative experiences when disclosing their potentially spiritually transformative experiences (pSTEs) to mental health professionals. Counselors who dismiss or diagnose such experiences risk being culturally insensitive and therapeutically harmful. Presenters will discuss a method for training counselors to counsel clients with pSTEs, will provide materials, and will demonstrate how to include this instruction in a multicultural counseling or supervision class. Janice Miner Holden Ed.D. Sarah M. Blalock MEd.                     education spirituality multicultural
215 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 306 Developmental Infusion of Social Justice Constructs in Counselor Education: Shifting the Paradigm Social justice is a critical component within our field and has been called the “fifth force” in counseling and has been proclaimed a national imperative for counselor educators (Chang, Crethar, & Ratts, 2010; Ratts, 2009). The field has responded with greater infusion of social justice into counselor pedagogy and supervision (Brubaker, Puig, Reese, & Young, 2010; Glosoff & Durham, 2010). Through this research, innovative strategies have emerged that extend across the developmental trajectory for students. However, Ratts and Wood (2011) noted that “more action is needed for counselor educators to appropriately respond to the ‘fierce urgency of now’” (p.22). Engaging counselor educators programmatically and framing this learning process from a developmental perspective can provide structure to social justice action within counselor education. Established developmental models such as the Integrated Development Model (Stoltenburg, 2005) provide a heuristic to frame the progression of programmatic structure and teaching from admissions through graduation to foster student learning and greater involvement. Educators have been diligently completing research that has helped move counseling into a profession where social justice is a critical element in practice. Organizing these works under a developmental umbrella can provide a succinct and structured way to infuse social justice action in counselor education. Linking student development with social justice action Identifying programmatic strategies for infusing social justice Gain awareness of potential areas for future research Social justice continues to be a force in the counseling field and is critical for counselor education. The field has responded with greater infusion of social justice into counselor education programs. Through collective research, innovative strategies have emerged that extend across the development of students. Enhancing programmatic engagement and framing this learning process from a developmental perspective will continue to promote action in the area of social justice. Steve Moody Ph.D. Justin Lauka Ph.D.                     Social Justice Development Administration
Need # 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 307 Queering Research & Scholarship Research with lesbian, gay male, bisexual, transgender, queer, and other gender and sexuality diverse people requires specific knowledge, attitudes, self-awareness, and skills. Ethical guidelines, competency frameworks, and consensus in the literature base affirm the need for LGBTQ counseling competence, but these general guidelines may seem overwhelming or to abstract for counselor-scholars new to conceptualizing research with LGBTQ populations. Concrete operationalization of best practice guidelines, using applied examples and research products, will help counselor-scholars improve their competency level for research with gender and sexuality diverse populations. The specific goals of this education session will be to improve attendees’ skills for conducting research with LGBTQ populations. This will include being able to identify and apply best practice guidelines, engage consciousness-raising relative to gender and sexuality diverse issues, and use skills related to bracketing assumptions, languaging, recruiting participants, and interpreting results in light of potential heteronormative and cisgender bias will also be discussed. Lecture, group discussion, and activities will be used to facilitate session goals. The framework of LGBTQ counseling competence resonates with multicultural counseling competence, and the role that intersectionality plays in conceptualizing quality research with LGBTQ populations will be highlighted throughout the presentation. Participants will be able to identify and apply best practice guidelines for research with LGBTQ populations. Participants will be able to engage in consciousness-raising activities related to awareness of and attitudes towards LGBTQ issues in counseling. Participants will be able to identify and practice conrete skills related to competent research with LGBTQ populations, including bracketing, languaging, recruiting participatns, and accounting for bias in when interpreting results. Research with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and other gender and sexuality diverse people requires specific knowledge, attitudes, self-awareness, and skills. Concrete operationalization of best practice guidelines, using applied examples and research products, will help counselor-scholars improve their competency for research with LGBTQ populations. Lecture, group discussion, and activities will be used to foster attendees’ LGBTQ competence in the domain of research. Jeffry Moe Ph.D.                           LGBTQ Research Multicultural
216 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 308 Some Pretty Neat Approaches to Promoting Learning in a Psychodiagnosis Class Rationale: The recent introduction of the DSM-5 has provided a terrific opportunity for counselor educators to update psychodiagnosis coursework. Meaningful changes to this required  course can: (a) increase use of high impact learning practices, (b) support practical application of course material, (c) prepare students for success on the National Clinical Mental Health Counselors Examination (NCMHCE), and (d) reinvigorate instructor enthusiasm.  / Program Goals: This session will present strategies that we have found effective while updating our psychodiagnosis and intervention coursework including: using distance technology to complete foundational didactic activities and account for student preparation to: (a) create time for in class for practical application of content, (b) design our examinations to model the NMHCE so that students evaluation requires dynamic application of material, (c) increase use of, project-based learning, and (d) use concept mapping to promote integration of knowledge related to psychodiagnosis, neurobiology, psychopharmacology, counseling theories, counseling interventions, strengths assessment, and access to community resources.    / Delivery Method: Didactic material will be supported by demonstrations of technology, handouts providing procedural details, and application of information by attendees.  / Connection to Conference Theme: All content will emphasize cultural sensitivity associated with pluralistic views of pedagogy and student empowerment. / Increase use of technology for meeting student learning outcomes Promote use of instructional materials that integrate content across counseling courses Promote use of strategies that require students to demonstrate knowledge of their communities resources and social justice issues The recent introduction of the DSM-5 has provided a terrific opportunity for counselor educators to update psychodiagnosis coursework.  This program provides some of the strategies and materials that have been helpful for increasing use of high impact learning practices, supporting practical application of course material, preparing students for success on the National Clinical Mental Health Counselors Examination (NCMHCE), and (d) sustaining instructor enthusiasm. Stephen Lenz Ph.D., LPC NA                         Psychodiagnosis Pedagogy Instructional Technology
221 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 403 The Power of Metaphor: Creatively Using Metaphoric Stories to Facilitate Counselor Development There is both anecdotal and empirical evidence supporting the use of metaphor as an intervention with counseling clients (Duffy, 2010) and as a tool to facilitate development in counselors-in-training (Sommer, Ward & Scofield, 2010) and counselor-supervisors-in-training (Duffy & Guiffrida, 2014). Metaphor works by assisting individuals in making sense of novelty through comparison to their own unique prior knowledge / experience, and by promoting / facilitating critical self-reflection (Krippner, Bova, & Gray, 2007). Finding ways to integrate the interests, strengths, identity, and unique knowledge of the client, counselor-in-training, and/or counselor supervisee in the counseling or the learning process is a hallmark of constructive approaches. The ability for counselors, counselor supervisors, and counselor educators to creatively use metaphor and metaphoric stories to facilitate development and assist individuals navigating transitions within these contexts provides a strength-based approach that honors the uniqueness and meaning-making capabilities of each individual. /  / Using a combination of mini-lecture, small-group discussion, and metaphor-based activities developed by the presenters, participants will learn: (a) the rationale for using metaphor-based activities to promote learning and development (b) how to use metaphor-based activities in the classroom and during supervision, (c) about research that has examined the efficacy of the approach, and (d) structured metaphor-based activities that can be used to facilitate learning and development. Time will also be devoted to allow program participants to share their own unique experiences utilizing metaphor in the context of the counseling classroom and/or supervision.  / 1. Attendees will understand the rationale for using interventions employing metaphoric stories in counselor education, counselor supervision, and clinical supervisor training to facilitate critical reflection, meaning-making, and development 2. Attendees will be introduced to and understand how to use metaphoric stories to facilitate the development of counselors and clinical supervisors 3.     Attendees will be exposed to research conducted by the presenters that supports the use of metaphor in counselor education and counselor supervision. The presenters will overview the use of metaphor in counseling, counselor education, and counselor supervision and present two innovative activities employing metaphoric stories and creative writing that can be used for counselor-training purposes. Two recent qualitative studies conducted by the presenters examining the efficacy of the approach in the context of counselor training and counselor supervisor training will be discussed. Jason Duffy PhD Steve Kassirer Juris Doctorate                     Metaphor Constructivism Pedagogy
222 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 406 Integrative Reflective Model of Supervision: A Supervisor and Supervisee's Perspective Rationale: “Clinical supervision is the signature pedagogy of the mental health professions” (Bernard & Goodyear, 2009, p.1). Supervision serves as a method of instruction and evaluation of counselor-in-training skill development as well as oversees the welfare of the client. Certification and professional codes (Ethical Guidelines for Counseling Supervisors) exist to define the role of the supervisor and supervisee, as well as outline professional, legal, and ethical standards for supervisors (ACES, 1993).  Supervision is informed by ethical guidelines in addition to a model for clinical supervision. Many beginning supervisors, prior to a supervision course or workshop, tend to use their theoretical orientation or lens with which they utilized as a counselor (Bernard & Goodyear). As supervisors, structuring and informing one’s role as a supervisor with a particular model of supervision not only provides structure to the relationship and experience, but offers guidance and focus within the supervisory relationship.  / The presenter has been a Counselor Educator for 13 years and has served in the role of supervisor for 15 years. As a faculty member, I have supervised counselors-in-training using multiple supervision methods to include individual, triadic, and group supervision. In my experience with supervision, and over time, I have come to value the use of triadic supervision that is informed by the Reflective Model of Triadic Supervision (RMTS) (Kleist & Hill, 2004). However, the use of the RMTS has been solely focused on triadic supervision, not group supervision. Counseling programs that are accredited by CACREP are required to provide group supervision for the internship experience. In group supervision, I have found students to be somewhat engaged in the supervision process, but not responsible for their participation. For the student presenting his or her counseling tape, students sometimes responded defensively to the feedback from both the instructor and their peers. Although my supervision is informed and guided by the Discrimination Model (DM) (Bernard, 1979), I’ve felt as if student reflection was missing. As a result, I began the process of integrating two supervision models (RMTS and DM) into one integrative model which I call Integrative Reflective Model of Group Supervision (IRM) (author). / My rationale for presenting this model not only stems from the significance of having a model to use and inform supervision, but to add a reflective piece – that allows student reflection (RMTS) in learning – along with a structured model of supervision. In the DM, the students not presenting are given specific areas to focus feedback, much like a supervisor. By teaching the students the DM and having them attend to one of the three foci area (i.e., Intervention, Conceptualization, and Personalization) while listening to their peer’s tape, the students are actively involved and learning to function in a supervisory role (CACREP, 2009; CMHC standard A.5.). Simultaneously, students are learning models of clinical supervision, developing supervisory skills, and engaging in a valuable vicarious learning experience as a trainee.   /  / An overview of this model will be presented to participants to inform the discussion of the model from a supervisor's and a supervisee's perspective and experience. The supervisor and supervisee had worked together in group supervision for one year and will discuss their experiences of using this model for group supervision.  /  / The goal of this program includes the following: expose professionals to the IRM of group supervision; share multiple perspectives and experiences with the IRM of group supervision; generate further discussion of the model and it's application to participants' supervision practices. /  / The delivery method will be a combination of presentation of an overview of the IRM of group supervision, and an interactive discussion between the presenters and the participants.  /  / The conference theme calls for leadership within our field that enhances practice from a culturally diverse understanding. We believe that the presentation of the IRM of group supervision provides each member of group supervision a voice in the supervision process, thus inviting all voices and perspectives to the process.  / Teach participants the IRM of group supervision. Share multiple perspectives and experiences using the IRM of group supervision from a supervisor's and supervisee's perspective. Generate discussion of the application of the IRM of group supervision to participants supervision. This program will provide participants with an overview of the Integrative Reflective Model of Group Supervision. Each presenter, a supervisor and former supervisee, will share experiences of using the model for group supervision in practicum and internship over the course of one year. Participants are encouraged to discuss the application of the model to their supervision, as well as ask questions of the presenters to further understand their perspective from a supervisor and supervisee's experience. Tracy Stinchfield Ed.D. Ryan Bowers M.A.                     Integrative Reflective Model Group Supervision  
223 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 407 Exploring Student and Instructor Perceptions of Trust-Building in Higher Education Online Courses The purpose of our qualitative study was to explore both student and instructor perceptions of trust-building that may lead to an effective online environment that brings together students of diverse cultural backgrounds and closes the achievement gap (Blanchard, Welbourne, & Boughton, 2011). Distance education offers an array of educational opportunities for marginalized populations (Allen & Seaman, 2013). Trust, a feeling of comfortable safety and confidence (Latusek & Gerbasi, 2010), in online counselor education classrooms can build strong positive student relationships across cultures to enhance student engagement and optimize learning (Doll, Spies, & Champion, 2012).  /  / Individually interviewing five instructor-student dyads, three themes emerged related to culturally relevant practices for trust-building online: (a) exchange of information, (b) participation in group activities, and (c) instructor presence. The significant implication of this study is that counselor educators must move away from simply transferring traditional face-to-face activities to online delivery and find new ways to create an online environment that builds trust and enhances academic success for students across a variety of contexts and cultures. /  / Program goals are to: / • Disseminate our research findings regarding successful instructional strategies for counselor educators to build trust online  / • Highlight the best online practices to engage diverse students / • Encourage participants to share ideas regarding culturally relevant online instruction in counselor education /  / The proposed format will be an interactive education session to reflect upon research findings and best online practices. Handouts of resources will be distributed. / As a result of this program, attendees will • identify best practices for culturally relevant online pedagogy As a result of this program, attendees will • explore strategies that support counselor education students’ online success across settings and cultures As a result of this program, attendees will • understand the importance of culturally relevant pedagogy and practices online as a viable means of social justice outreach and student academic success The purpose of our qualitative study was to explore both online student and instructor perceptions of trust-building that may lead to an effective online environment for counselor education students. Trust facilitates strong positive student relationships and optimal learning. Rather than simply transferring traditional face-to-face activities to online delivery, findings identify culturally relevant practices to create an engaging online environment that fosters trust and academic success for all counselor education students across a variety of contexts and cultures. Mary Alice Bruce Ph.D. Suzanne Young Ph.D. Dana West M.S. Jacinta Nekesa M.S. April Megginson M.S. Julius Austin, M.S., University of Wyoming / Konja Klepper, Ph.D., Capella University online trust-building relationships
224 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 408 Using Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning in Counseling Education The education session will provide information on how to apply Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning when designing a Multiculturalism course. The rationale for this presentation begins with research that suggests ineffective teaching methods continue to be utilized. Therefore, the basic problem is that, although faculty members want their students to achieve higher kinds of learning, they continue to use ineffective teaching methods to promote such learning.  Universities nationwide have begun a schema shift to increase significant learning through the use of effective teaching methods. Parallel to the national effort to improve teaching, Fink sought a better way to provide significant learning experiences for students which lead to the development of a model called the Taxonomy of Significant Learning.  The taxonomy takes a learner-centered stance and is aligned with a Constructivist paradigm, favored by counseling educators and those using 21st Century teaching methods. Incorporating the taxonomy and developing a course that has interrelated learning goals, learning activities, and assessment gives the educator the ability to create an experience for the students that will evoke learning that is significant rather than simple, powerful rather than pedestrian. The program goals of the presentation are to meet the learning objectives by providing information on how to utilize Fink’s Taxonomy to redesign the Multiculturalism course as a significant learning experience.  The program delivery method will be isomorphic: the presenters will utilize experiential strategies to facilitate the learning of the taxa and how to apply them to course design. The presentation is connected to the conference theme by applying the taxonomy to a course on Multiculturalism, identifying powerful experiences that can be utilized to meet CACREP course objectives and promote significant learning for students. Participants will gain an understanding of Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning. Participants will learn how Fink’s Taxonomy can promote learning in a Counseling Multiculturalism course. Participants will develop the skills to apply Fink’s Taxonomy to their own courses to promote significant learning. The education session will provide information on Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning and how to apply the taxa for designing and teaching a Multiculturalism course.  Despite empirical evidence supporting experiential learning, antiquated and ineffective teaching methods are predominantly utilized to promote learning.  Fink’s Taxonomy seeks to promote not just learning, but significant learning using effective teaching methods. The taxonomy takes a learner-centered stance and is aligned with a Constructivist paradigm, favored by counseling educators and those using 21st Century teaching methods. Fink’s Taxonomy provides a framework that gives the educator the ability to create an experience for the students that will evoke learning that is significant and powerful. Traci Richards M.S.Ed Eric Brown Ed.S Kristy Carlisle M.A. Mike Kalkbrenner M.S.         Fink’s Taxonomy Significant Learning Course Design
217 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 309 Wellness Strategies toThrive during the Pre-tenure Experience Rationale: /  / The work to get a PhD in Counselor Education is arduous. Once the ink is dry on the diploma there are further hurdles to navigate through the pre-tenured experience.  Literature regarding the transition from doctoral studies to assistant professor speaks to surviving the pre-tenured experience and keeping sane (Dinkins, 2007; Felder, 1994; Felder & Brent, 2007; Hara, 2010). Advice such as “be quiet and don’t say a word” is written by well-meaning individuals (Dinkins, 2007); however, narrative discourses such as as these do not engage new faculty in a culture that embraces resilience and thriving. Given that counselor educators train students from a wellness based perspective, it is possible for this transitional experience to be more than merely survived.  /  / While it is true that the convergence of all the new roles that assistant professors are confronted with can be overwhelming (Niles, Akos, & Spencer, 2001), often suggested strategies for new professors are limited to the three main roles of research, teaching and service. In addition to the roles of research, teaching and service, there is the conflict of personal roles as well (friend, partner, parent, etc.) From a wellness based perspective, it seems important to exercise a holistic approach that incorporates the roles of the position with the needs of a person in order to thrive in academia.  / As newly tenured professors, the presenters will stimulate thoughts and ideas about how to not just survive the pre-tenure period but thrive utilizing a wellness based approach that focuses not only on the position, but the person. Counselor education is a field founded on principles of wellness and well-being; therefore, it only makes sense that perhaps reframing surviving as thriving is a discussion that would be very valuable to doctoral students, new assistant professors  and associate and full professor who may be mentoring new faculty.  /  / Goals:  / The presenters share personal experiences about their own tenure process with primary goals of this presentation being:  1.  to increase participants knowledge about the pre-tenure experience including expectations and fears, 2. To challenge the use of language such as survive and reframe the experience as thriving, 3. Increase participants awareness of own professional and personal needs as it relates to the pre-tenured experience , and 4. provide wellness strategies and ideas to navigate the pre-tenure process.  /  / Delivery Method: This presentation will incorporate thought provoking experiential activities to stimulate discussion about this topic.  /  / The conference theme-  “ACES Leadership for Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and Practice” – is a good fit for this presentation because to be culturally relevant in pedagogy and practice, educators must first become aware of what their own experiences are as educators. The transition from doctoral student to educator is a transition that is fraught with many fears and anxieties, yet what we know of counseling is that if we talk about and discuss fears and anxieties they do not seem as overwhelming.  Academia is a sub-culture that is often difficult to understand and navigate, this presentation hopes to begin a genuine and honest dialogue about this cultural experience with the hope of helping others thrive, rather than just survive the experience. / Increase knowledge regarding the pre-tenured experience Challenge the use of language that reinforces negative images of pre-tenure Increase awareness of personal and professional goals regarding pre-tenure The presenters maintain that new faculty should not settle for just surviving the pre-tenured experience. While literature about the pre-tenured process paints a rather dismal picture, the presenters will take the mystery out of the pre-tenure process and discuss their own successes and challenges navigating the experience.  Negative narrative discourse regarding the pre-tenured experience will be challenged using a variety of thought provoking and wellness based experiential activities. Rebecca Koltz PhD Melissa Odegard PhD Cristen Wathen PhD               Counselor Educators Pre-tenure Wellness
218 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 310 Working with School Counseling Site Supervisors and Diverse Supervisees: Best Practices for the University Supervisor Diversity and inclusion of multicularlism in the counseling profession is a growing imperative. There is a growing need for multicultural issues to be addressed as part of counselor training and supervision. Supervision has been identified as a significant component in the continuous development of professional counselors (Garret, et al., 2001). Researchers support that multicultural supervision is a significant predictor of supervisee’s multicultural self-efficacy (Garret, et al., 2001; Robertson, 2006; Sommer, et al., 2009). The ability of site supervisors to work with diverse supervisees will have an impact on the supervisees’ future counseling work. To facilitate this process for supervisees, supervisors must have an adequate level of cultural awareness, knowledge, and communication skills.  / It is important for university supervisors to continue to enhance the multicultural competence of school counseling site supervisors and teach implementation of best practices for site supervisors who are working with diverse supervisees. It is imperative that school counseling site supervisors’ current knowledge reflects the best practices for working with diverse supervisees, and that site supervisors continue to enhance their multicultural competence, as well as their own. It is critical that counselors and counselor educators obtain information from recent pedagogy and research about culturally competent supervisory practices and tools to enhance their own multicultural competence. This educational session will provide participants with a working knowledge of the best practices for working with diverse supervisees and multicultural supervision.  / Participants will obtain information from recent pedagogy and research about culturally competent supervisory practices Participants will learn best practices for working with diverse supervisees. Participants will receive tools to enhance their own multicultural competence Supervision is a critical practice in the development of professional counselors. University supervisors are in a critical position when working with site supervisors who supervise diverse supervisees. It is important for university supervisors to be aware of the best practices for working with diverse individuals in order to transcend awareness and information to site supervisors. It is also imperative that university supervisors continue to enhance their own multicultural competence. In this session participants will learn current best practices for working with diverse supervisees, receive tools for enhancing their own competence, and be made aware of strategies for aiding site supervisors who are working with diverse supervisees. Helena Rindone ABD, MA Lisa Wines PhD                     Supervision School Counseling Multiculturalism
225 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 409 Weightism: What it is, why it matters and steps we can take to influence change The percentage of the U.S. population described as overweight or obese has been climbing steadily and the majority of the population now has a BMI of ≥ 25.  Although more people are dealing with weight issues, the level of tolerance regarding size has not significantly improved.  As advocates for those who are marginalized, it is important for counseling professionals to understand the extent of anti-fat bias and engage in discussions regarding steps that can be taken to address the issue which impacts clients, students, supervisees, and  society as a whole.   /  This interactive session will introduce the attendees to the topic of weightism and the prevalence of this form of discrimination in the U.S., and its implication in a variety of settings including education, career/employment, and healthcare.   A review of the literature will demonstrate the likelihood that  our clients will be impacted by this form of bias, and that practitioners may also have an implicit bias when it comes to body size. The presenter will dialogue with the attendees as to the ways in which the topic can be broached with students and supervisees. The attendees will also engage in a discussion as to the placement of this topic in the counselor education curriculum.  The presenter will use PowerPoint to guide the discussion and will make a reference list available to the attendees. / Attendees will be able to explain the concept of weightism and its implications. Attendees will be able to articulate the benefits of introducing the topic of weight discrimination in counselor education programs and supervision Attendees will be able to provide their students and supervisees with resources that can be used as part of their self reflection process. More people are facing with weight issues than ever before, yet the level of tolerance regarding size has not significantly improved. As advocates for those who are marginalized, counseling professionals should understand the extent of anti-fat bias and  take steps to address the issue. This session will spotlight the topic of weightism, the prevalence of this form of discrimination, and the benefits of incorporating conversations on this topic in counselor education programs and supervision. Connie Ducaine MA                           weightism anti-fat bias weight discrimination
220 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 402 Cultural and Religious Considerations for Counseling Latter-Day Saint Clients This session outlines cultural and religious considerations for counseling members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (commonly referred to as Mormons). The LDS church is the fourth largest religious group in the United States, with over 6 million members. In addition, the  2012 Religious Congregations and Membership Survey (RCMS) reported that the LDS church is the fastest growing religious  group  in the United States.  /  / Despite these factors, there is a great deal of misinformation and mistrust regarding Mormonism. Many counselors have limited information regarding members of this faith, and the degree to which its tenants and culture may impact LDS clients. The goal of this session is provide counselors with an overview of key tenants and cultural factors that may be helpful in the treatment of LDS clients, as well as recommendations for treatment and support of these clients. AMCD's multicultural counseling competencies will be used as a framework for the session.  /  / The session will be delivered using powerpoint, group discussion, and stories illustrating key points of the session. Participants will be provided with a list of peer-reviewed articles and references that may be useful when working with LDS clients, as well as details on support systems that may be available to LDS clients. To provide counseling professionals with an understanding of cultural and religious factors that may impact the treatment of LDS clients. To provide counseling professionals an understanding of LDS attitudes toward mental health counseling. To provide counseling professionals with an understanding of support systems available to LDS clients. This session provides an overview of cultural and religious considerations when treating members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (commonly referred to as Mormons). Using the Multicultural Counseling Competencies as a framework, this session will orient participants to major belief systems and worldviews that may assist in the treatment of LDS clients. In addition, the session will outline LDS attitudes toward counseling, potential barriers to treatment, and support resources that may be helpful when working with members of this population. Jeffrey Parsons Ph.D. Tamera Fenton M.Ed.                     Multicultural Counseling Competencies Counseling Religious Clients Mormonism
228 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A Suicide and LGBTQ Youth, Is it Really a Problem? Researchers report that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth are more likely than their straight peers to attempt suicide (American Association of Suicidology, 2015). Studies have found that LGB students are more than three times likely to seriously contemplate suicide (AAS, 2015). Research has also indicated that LGB youth who experience family rejection are 8.4 times more likely to report having attempted suicide when compared with peers from families with little or no rejection (Family Acceptance Project, 2009). Practicing counselors, as well as counselor educators may not always understand the role they can play in helping LGBTQ youth overcome these stressors. Therefore, a paradigm shift is warranted within training programs, where counselor educators scaffold LGBTQ-inclusive pedagogy that focuses on preventing suicide, educating trainees on the role of family support and rejection, and the importance of advocacy within their communities to support LGBTQ youth. The goal of this presentation is to help counselor educators identify and understand the scope of suicidality with LGBTQ youth and how this can impact their teaching and supervision of counselors in training. Through lecture and discussion, this interactive presentation will provide counselor educators with LGBTQ-inclusive pedagogical strategies such as programs and social media resources from The Trevor Project, to help educate future counselors on how to properly assess and support suicidal clients. Given the recent and tragic suicide within the transgender community, the cultural competence focus within this presentation is timely and relevant to the 2015 ACES conference theme. Counselor educators will learn pedagogical examples on LGBTQ-competent suicidal prevention, which explore risk and protective factors (e.g., family acceptance, safe schools, culturally competent care) to decrease suicidal behavior Participants will discuss strategies in how to respond and support LGB youth in crisis situations Participants will also engage in dialogue in how to advocate and evaluate systemic laws and polices that work towards a decrease in suicide amongst LGBT youth. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth are more likely than their straight peers to attempt suicide (American Association of Suicidology, 2015). Counselor educators may not understand the role they can play in helping LGBTQ youth overcome these stressors. Therefore, a paradigm shift is warranted, where counselor educators scaffold LGBTQ-inclusive pedagogy that focuses on preventing suicide, understanding the role of family support and rejection, and the importance of advocacy. The goal of this presentation is to help counselor educators identify and understand the scope of suicidality with LGBTQ youth. Laura Gallo M.A., NCC Matthew Beck M.S. Ed, LCPC, NCC NA                   LGBTQ Suicide Risk Prevention
242 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Culturally Relevant International Counseling, Research, and Teaching: Counselor Educators Share Best Practices International outreach in counselor education has experienced steady development over the years (Gerstein, Heppner, Stockton, Leong, & ģgisdóttir, 2009).  Many counselor educators take advantage of global opportunities to expand their cultural consciousness and social justice advocacy worldwide (West-Olatunji, Goodman, Mehta, & Templeton, 2011). Culturally relevant counseling involves a respect for the cultural landscape and experiences of diverse individuals, families, and communities. One of the ways counselor educators can expand and promote the development of cultural competency is through international immersion experiences and collaborations. Thus, it is important for counselors to continue to promote an exploration and understanding of what culturally relevant practice means within a global context (Coker & Majuta, 2015). The goals of this interactive program are to: / • highlight the best practices of seasoned counselor educators who have been involved in research, teaching, counseling, and community outreach globally; / • explore the ways in which counselor education and supervision can be enhanced through international engagement; / • describe how counselor educators can use international engagement as a means to promote culturally relevant practices; and / • encourage international collaborations among counselor educators.  /  / The proposed format will be a roundtable discussion. Panelist will give a brief description of their international experiences and share best practices.  Audience members will be encouraged to ask questions, reflect on their own experiences, and engage in discussions.  Handouts highlighting best practices and resources will be distributed. / • learn best practices for international research, teaching, counseling, and service; • explore the ways in which counselor educators can use international engagement as a means to promote culturally relevant practices and • develop a deeper understanding and appreciation for the integration of international cultural immersion experiences to enhance the professional identity of counselors; and • understand the importance of international counseling as a viable means of social justice outreach. What critical issues are involved in conducting culturally relevant counseling, research, and service internationally? How might counselor educators use global understanding to expand cultural competencies and knowledge in counselor education?  This interactive program highlights the expertise of a panel of counselor educators who share best practices in international engagement and practice around the world.  /  / Angela Coker Ph.D. Mary Alice Bruce Ph.D. Charles Gressard Ph.D. Sachin Jain Ph.D. Uchenna Nwachuku Ph.D. Syntia Santos, Ph.D., NCC / Assistant Professor / East Carolina University / Ragsdale Hall 223B / Mail Stop 121 / Greenville, NC 27858 / (252) 737 1896 / santosfigueroas14@ecu.edu /  / Suneetha Manyam, Ph.D, LPC, NCC / Associate Professor of Counseling and Human Services / Penfield College / Mercer University, Atlanta. / Phone: 678 547 6032 / manyam_sb@mercer.edu /  / Kristi A. Lee, Ph.D., NCC / Assistant Professor of Community Counseling / Counseling and School Psychology / School of Education / Seattle University / 206.296.5751 / leekrist@seattleu.edu / Cultural Competence Internationalization Social Justice
243 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Assessing CACREP Clinical Mental Health Outcomes in a Diagnosis and Treatment Planning Course Rationale: CACREP requires CMHC students to know the diagnostic process and treatment of mental disorders. Students are also required to know how to write case conceptualizations and treatment plans. Moreover is the understanding that students apply multicultural competencies to CMHC as it relates to case conceptualization, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders. Therefore, counselor educators need to incorporate pedagogical techniques that are also culturally sensitive in order for students to best learn the importance of diagnosis, treatment planning, and case conceptualizations in a culturally sensitive manner. This roundtable will provide attendees with ideas for how to meet these SLOs, while also allowing them to brainstorm with other professionals on the topic.  / Goal: To offer counselor educators real-world examples of pedagogical techniques that meet CACREP SLOs regarding Diagnosis and Treatment planning. / Delivery: The presenter will engage attendees in conversation regarding CMHC SLOs, CACREP requirements, and effective and creative classroom activities. / Connection to Theme: Preparing developing counselors for real-world experiences through effective pedagogical techniques is invaluable for CMHC students. A central theme in CMHC is diagnosis, treatment planning, and the ability to write case conceptualizations while being culturally appropriate. Therefore, this roundtable will provide attendees with teaching techniques and activities that will help students to practice in a culturally relevant, ethical, and successful manner.  / Objectives:  / 1. Attendees will learn how to implement CACREP SLOs into a Diagnosis and Treatment Planning course. / 2. Attendees will gain awareness of creative and effective ways to teach content in a Diagnosis and Treatment Planning course. / 3. Attendees will understand the importance of culturally-sensitive pedagogical techniques within a Diagnosis and Treatment Planning course.  /       During this roundtable, we will discuss strategies to incorporate CACREP Clinical Mental Health Counseling (CMHC) student learning outcomes (SLOs) into a Diagnosis and Treatment Planning course.  / Specifically, we will review relevant CMHC diagnosis- related SLOs, consider creative ways to include these SLOs into readings and activities, and review approaches to evaluate student learning.  / The presenter will share examples of how they integrated diagnosis-related CACREP SLOs into course curriculum. / Renee Sherrell Ph. D.                           Diagnosis Pedagogy CACREP
244 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon B Addressing Race-Based Trauma in the Counselor Education Classroom Following cases like Treyvon Martin and Michael Smith Jr., many Americans are asking - what role does race play in the United States? This proposal was developed to initiate a dialogue in counselor education that explores the role of race-based trauma and the provision of counseling services. Research has consistently noted that racial (Nieghbors, Caldwell, Williams, Neese, Taylor, Bullard, Torres & Jackson, 2007) and gender (Vogel, Wester, Hammer & Downing-Matibag, 2013) disparities exist in the utilization and continuation of mental health services for African American men and women. According to Hammond (2010), African American men may underutilize health care services due to personal factors (age, identification with ultra-masculine behaviors), historical factors (how African Americans were treated during previous medical trials) and socio factors (institutional discrimination). In a study conducted by Williams and Williams-Morris (2000), researchers were able to thematically separate race based discrimination, as it relates to mental health into three categories: 1) institutional racism that leads to barriers in accessing and receiving treatment; 2) the experience of racial discrimination that impacts one’s identity and overall mental health; and 3) internationalization of these discriminatory messages that impairs one’s perception of self and the world. The result of these barriers is that many mental health issues experienced by people of color go untreated (Holden, et al, 2012).  Individuals, who have experienced racial discrimination, may report negative symptomology including depression (Karlsen & Nazroo, 2002), increased use of alcohol consumption, poor self-concept, health complications and decreased self-esteem (Verkuyten, 1998; Williams & Williams-Morris, 2000).  In addition, posttraumatic symptomology similar to that of individuals who are survivors of domestic violence and/or sexual assault may be experienced (Bryant-Davis & Ocampo, 2005). Despite these negative mental and physical health associations, individuals of color are less likely to access mental health services and are more likely to prematurely terminate the counseling relationship (Altice, Mostashari, & Friedland, 2001).   / It is imperative that counselor educators begin to address race-based trauma in the classroom to better prepare counselors-in-training. This presentation will provide educators with a toolkit to help them incorporate issues related to race-based trauma into the classroom. Pedagogy and evaluation methods will be included. 1) initiate a dialogue in the counseling community that centers on race based trauma, post traumatic growth and counselor education 2) discuss current research findings related to race based trauma and post traumatic growth; 3) demonstrate how counselors educators can incorporate post traumatic growth into their classrooms This presentation will examine race-based trauma and the pervasive impact it can have on people of color. Counselor educators are called to examine the impact of race-based trauma on client populations and incorporate pedagogy practices that address this issue in the United States. In consideration of Ferguson, Missouri and the Call to Action for all Americans, this presentation will focus on training counselors to address issues of race-based trauma in counseling and will help to prepare counselor educators to address these issues in the counseling classroom. Amanda Evans PhD                           race-based trauma    
229 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A Preparing counselors in training to support linguistically diverse students and families. Rationale:  / In order to take part in advocacy oriented school counseling with English Language Learners, counselors must communicate with their family members. Participants in this roundtable discussion will examine the voices of linguistically diverse parents shared in interviews. Additionally, presenters will facilitate a dialogue about how counselor training programs are preparing students work with English Language Learners and their families.   /  / Goals:  / Participants will examine the factors impacting linguistically diverse family experiences in schools. /  / Discuss pedagogical approaches to prepare counselors in training for linguistically diverse clientele. /  / Delivery Method: / Presenters will facilitate a scholarly discussion in three parts. First participants will examine and discuss quotes shared by linguistically diverse parents in a research study conducted by one of the presenters.  /  / Next the facilitators will share findings from the literature that examines counseling with linguistically diverse individuals.  /  / Finally, roundtable participants will share additional strategies and ideas to prepare counselors in training to support linguistically diverse families.  /  / Conference Theme Connection: / This roundtable session will integrate the focus of the conference by amplifying the voices of linguistically diverse families. The session will utilize the voices of linguistically diverse individuals, in order to generate ideas for culturally relevant pedagogy and practice. / Participants will understand how differences in language impact linguistically diverse families seeking support in schools. Participants will discuss activities that help counselors in training gain experiences with linguistically diverse families   In order to take part in advocacy oriented school counseling with English Language Learners, counselors must communicate with their family members. Participants in this roundtable discussion will examine the voices of linguistically diverse parents shared in interviews. Additionally, presenters will facilitate a dialogue about how counselor training programs are preparing students work with English Language Learners and their families. Malti Tuttle EdS Leonissa Johnson PhD                     Linguistically Diverse families Pedagogy Social Justice Advocacy
230 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A It’s Not All Stress and Struggle: Acculturation and Cross-cultural Counseling Recently, the number of international students in counselor education in the United States has increased (Ng, 2006; Ng and Smith, 2011), in part due to the globalization of counseling (Cameron, 2014; Kim-Appel & Appel, 2014). As counselor educators and supervisors working with international students, we witness acculturation challenges that can affect mental and physical health (Kim, 1995; Thomas & Althen, 1989; Ye, 2005). Acculturation is a process of behavioral and psychological change as a result of being exposed to another culture (Berry, 1997; Matsudaira, 2006). Acculturation challenges people to overcome language barriers (Greenland & Brown, 2005) and negotiate a wide variety of cultural differences in order to adapt to a host country.  / While acculturation stress is an important consideration when working with international clients and supervisees, recent research suggests cultural identity and lifespan development stage are influential.  In this roundtable discussion, presenters will share research results regarding acculturation among Japanese university students that indicates the importance of a holistic view in conceptualizing supervisees and clients living in a host culture. As a result of this discussion, participants will leave with concrete suggestions for implementation into counseling and supervision practice with international students. Understand the nature of acculturation and its influential factors, based on a brief review of recent research on Japanese international students in the United States. Learn a framework that emphasizes the importance of a holistic view for conceptualizing the experiences of international supervisees and clients living in the U.S. Apply concrete strategies for enhancing supervision practice with international supervisees and clients. Please join us for a discussion on a reconsideration of the acculturation process for international students, and implementation strategies for supervision and counseling practice. In a brief overview of qualitative research on the acculturation processes of Japanese students, he presenters will share findings and present a holistic framework for conceptualizing the experiences of international supervisees and clients in the U.S. Concrete supervision and counseling strategies, handouts included. Makoto Miyoshi MSEd Julia Champe Ph.D Vanessa Renshaw MSEd               Multiculturalism Counselor Education U.S.-Japan
231 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015 Salon A The Healing Circle: An American Indian Group Techinique The development and use of a culturally adapted technique has become more prominent over the past two decades.  This growing interest has been driven by the need to provide more culturally relevant counseling interventions to individuals from American Indian groups.  This session will provide participants with an overview and first-hand experience of the American Indian cultural practice that is grounded in history of many indigenous people.  The use of the Talking Circle is a way of confidential communication of emotional experiences within the safety of cultural tradition.  The goals are to examine and experience a cultural method of communication, increase nonjudgmental listening skills and awareness, facilitate professional self-awareness, and to train other professionals to understand and respect American Indian culture.  The technique emphasizes the use of American Indian cultural values such as: equality, partnership/interconnection, sharing, humility, respect for others and all living things, and spirituality. Participants will gain an understanding of American Indian culture Participants will understand differences between cultural communication styles of Western and traditional American Indians Participants will be exposed to actual application of the cultural method. Behavioral health problems such as depression, anxiety, addictions, suicide, and family disruption are recognized as problematic for American Indians.  The ability to provide access to adequate, culture-based interventions is especially challenging.  In Indian country, the most recognized approach to address these issues is the special attention to the use of culturally relevant pedagogy and practice.  This presentation reviews a traditional best practice of grip therapy common to Native populations. Avis Garcia M.S. Deborah McGriff PhD                     Group American Indian
237 1 1:30-2:20 Thursday, October 8, 2015